Penn announces new Wharton dean


Geoffrey Garrett is currently professor of business in the Australia School of Business.


whartondean

Former dean at the Australian School of Business at the University of New South Wales, Geoffrey Garrett, will become Wharton's new dean on July 1. 



This morning, Penn announced Geoffrey Garrett will be the new dean of the Wharton School, effective July 1.

Garrett, who is currently a dean and professor of business at the Australian School of Business at the University of New South Wales, was a former faculty member in Wharton’s management department from 1995-1997. He will replace Thomas Robertson, who has held the position since 2007.

Garrett, a former Fulbright Scholar, completed his masters and doctoral degrees in political science at Duke University after graduating with honors from the Australian National University. He has authored and co-edited three books and writ ten over 40 scholarly articles.

“[Geoff] has a deep understanding of Wharton’s distinctive mission and a compelling vision for the role of business schools in an era of rapid change and globalization,” President Amy Gutmann said.

"[He] has unique experience in international business and business education and is absolutely the right person to partner with Wharton faculty, students, staff and alumni to take the School to even greater heights.”

Prior to his arrival at the University of New South Wales, Garrett held many distinguished positions around the world. He served as dean of the Business School at the University of Sydney and as founding CEO of the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. Earlier, he served as president of the Pacific Council on International Policy in Los Angeles.

Garrett has also held numerous leadership roles and faculty positions at universities including the University of South California, Yale University, Oxford University and Stanford University.

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