dnc_past

The 2016 Democratic National Convention will take place during the summer.

Photo: Courtesy Of Creative Commons

Even though the 2016 Democratic National Convention will take place during the summer, democratic Penn students are determined to not let the timing of the event prevent them from being involved.

The Democratic National Committee announced on Feb. 12 that the convention to elect the next Democratic nominee for president will be held at Philadelphia’s Wells Fargo Center on July 25, 2016.

While some students have expressed disappointment that they will be home for the summer and miss the convention, others have expressed their desire to stay in Philadelphia over the summer of 2016 to work for the DNC.

“That’s something I’m definitely interested in," College sophomore and Penn Democrats Political Director Sam Iacobellis said. "We are going to be here. And because we are the largest student Democratic group in the city, I think the convention will reach out to us as well when the needs come to fruition for them.”

Penn Dems have already begun coordinating with the DNC about internships and volunteering surrounding the convention. Several members of Penn Dems attended the annual DNC winter meetings in Washington D.C., where they discussed ways to work together for the 2016 convention.

Iacobellis also added that fundraising and logistics are the two major needs as the convention approaches.

“As the campaign starts to mobilize and as the date of the convention gets closer, more people are going to be needed to have it function,” he said. “Internships are going to be abound, whether it is more part time and close to the convention or more long term. It's developing as the team is being constructed.”

At this point, the Democratic convention will most likely be nominating Hilary Clinton as the Democratic nominee for president.

Clinton is currently dominating other potential Democratic candidates in polls. According to the McClatchy-Marist poll conducted on March 4, Clinton leads other potential candidates with 57.4 percent of national support. Vice-President Joe Biden and Senator Elizabeth Warren trail far behind with 13 percent and 12 percent, respectively.

While Clinton might be the source of some Democrats’ excitement for 2016, much of the enthusiasm revolves around the prospect of Philadelphia being at the heart of the Democratic political world.

“We have a huge number of active members who have been following this for a year,” Iacobellis said. “And they are especially energized right now. A lot of excitement and pieces are starting to fall in place.”

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