Quick Takes | Higher education round-up: Nov. 30


A weekly roundup of news from around the Ivy League and the higher-education community




Brown University

Majority oppose affirmative action

More than 58 percent of Brown students oppose the school’s use of race-based affirmative action in the admissions process, according to a Brown Daily Herald poll.

The Herald reported Thursday that just 34.5 percent of students said they supported the policy.

In the midst of a pending decision in the Supreme Court’s affirmative action case, Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, Brown, along with all Ivy League institutions, signed an amicus curiae brief this summer in defense of its admissions practices.

Dartmouth College

Hanlon named president

Dartmouth College announced Thursday that it has selected Philip Hanlon, the provost of the University of Michigan, as its next president. Hanlon’s term will begin in July 2013.

Hanlon will succeed Jim Yong Kim, who resigned in April to take the helm at the World Bank.

Hanlon, a mathematician, graduated from Dartmouth in 1977 and earned a doctoral degree from the California Institute of Technology. Among other things, he told The New York Times that he hopes to also teach a freshman math class once he begins his presidency.

Harvard University

Kinky sex club to be approved

Harvard College Munch — an approximately 30-member group that meets to discuss issues related to kinky sex — will receive formal recognition by the school’s Committee on Student Life on Friday, The Harvard Crimson reported-.

Through its recognition, Munch will now receive several benefits, including being able to post flyers for events around campus.

In addition to its conversations about kinky sex, the organization also recently created a safety team — a group that direct students who have been abused to resources on campus.

Pennsylvania State University

Spanier gets $3.3 million

Penn State revealed Wednesday that Graham Spanier — who was ousted as the school’s president last year in the midst of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal — received a total compensation package of $3,255,762 in 2011.

Spanier was indicted earlier this month on charges of perjury, concealing information about child abuse, obstructing a criminal investigation and endangering the welfare of children.

More than $2.4 million of Spanier’s 2011 salary was owed to him contractually under the terms of his 2010 employment agreement.

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