Quick Takes | Higher education round-up: Oct. 12


A weekly roundup of news from around the Ivy League and the higher-education community




Princeton University

Students call for responsible investing

The Princeton Coalition for Endowment Responsibility is calling on the University to form a committee to ensure that it is ethically investing its more than $17 billion in endowment resources.

The move follows an Undergraduate Student Government resolution last year, which encouraged Princeton to invest its money in “socially responsible ways.”

Like other Ivy League schools, Princeton in the past has been tied with HEI Hotels and Resorts, which has long been accused of unjust labor practices. According to The Daily Princetonian, Princeton dropped its investments with HEI in March.

Harvard University

Hong Kong parents sue former lecturer

A former Harvard lecturer who currently works as a private college admissions consultant is being sued for more than $2 million, according to The Harvard Crimson.

Gerald and Lily Chow, residents of Hong Kong, are claiming that Mark Zimny had assured them that their two sons would gain admission to several elite colleges where they applied, including Harvard. The sons were both rejected from Harvard.

According to the lawsuit, the Chows paid more than $2 million in donations to elite schools, as well as for Zimny’s services.

Cornell University

Admin may add School of Public Policy

Provost Kent Fuchs told The Cornell Daily Sun earlier this week that the school’s administrations is strongly considering creating a School of Public Policy.

If created, the school could possibly become Cornell’s eighth college. It could also be integrated into the school’s already-existing College of Human Ecology.

“I think this is very viable,” Fuchs told the newspaper. “There are a lot of students, faculty and alumni who are keenly interested in having a public policy school.”

Columbia University

J-school dean to step down

After serving a decade as dean of the Columbia Journalism School, Dean Nicholas Lemann will be stepping down from his position at the end of the academic year, the Columbia Daily Spectator reported.

During his tenure, Lemann oversaw the school’s evolution as the world of media and journalism has been experiencing rapid change.

Among other things, Lemann also led the establishment of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism and oversaw the school’s first-ever capital campaign. In an interview with The Spectator, he called his choice to step down an “instinct decision.”

Yale University

Search committee lays out expectations

A Yale search committee that is in the beginning stages of looking for a replacement for President Richard Levin released a statement earlier this week laying out its vision for an “ideal candidate.”

Among other things, the committee said it is looking to hire “a scholar and educator” who is committed to administrative duties, the Yale Daily News reported.

Levin announced his intention to step down earlier this school year. He has served at the helm of Yale since 1993.

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