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Kuprevich may become UNM chief

(05/19/95 9:00am)

and Gregory Montanaro University Police Commissioner John Kuprevich is on the University of New Mexico's short list of candidates for the next commissioner of public safety, according to UNM Police Lieutenant Steve Lewis. "He was my top choice," Lewis said, adding that Kuprevich is one of four finalists for the position. "I thought he was outstanding." Kuprevich confirmed this week that he "applied to a number of opportunities," and he said that UNM is "a fine institution." He added that no decision had been made and that several qualified applicants were in the running. He also said that the job "happened to open at the right time." Kuprevich announced on April 13 that he would resign his position at the University on July 31. At the time, he said he had accomplished all he had wanted to do at the University, and was ready to pursue new challenges elsewhere. "[Kuprevich] had a lot of experience on college campuses and good credentials and a good understanding of the issues universities [face]," Lewis said. UNM has 42 officers and is currently looking to upgrade their security officers to police status. Lewis said the the job became available when the current police chief left to work for a municipal police department. He described the crime situation at UNM as mainly "property crime." One hundred bicycles were stolen last year, partially because of a lack of education in the community about properly locking unattended possessions. Lewis said there were also a lot of auto accidents, auto thefts and two murders in the past four years. Kuprevich was the University's first commissioner of public safety and oversaw the University Police department and the Victim Support and Special Services unit since assuming the post in December 1990. Since his resignation, Kuprevich has maintained that he will stay involved in campus law enforcement. University officials have said that a replacement will be found in time for Kuprevich's departure this summer. Under the direction of Executive Vice President John Fry -- who received Kuprevich's letter of resignation -- a national search was initiated to identify people interested in working at the University. Details of the search were not available. Before coming to the University, Kuprevich headed Brown University's police and security department for nine years. At Brown, Kuprevich was credited with expanding the university's police department and improving relations between Brown and the state and local police. He also helped create a volunteer program to help female crime victims. Kuprevich's career began as a Pennsylvania State University police officer. He then worked at Wayne State University in Detroit for 11 years.


U. involved in chemical tests on prisoners

(05/19/95 9:00am)

and Jeremy Kahn University researchers were deeply involved in the secret testing of chemical warfare agents on human subjects throughout the 1950s and 1960s, a growing mountain of documents declassified over the past 25 years reveals. Many of these experiments were conducted by University-affiliated researchers on inmates in a Philadelphia prison who did not have full knowledge of the long-term health effects from exposure to the chemicals -- some of which are now known carcinogens. And these tests -- many involving the application of "blistering agents" which created acute acnelike skin conditions -- were conducted at the same time University researchers were forging ahead in the development of skin care products such as the anti-acne, anti-wrinkle drug Retin-A. University Professor Led Human Chemical Experiments The inventor of Retin-A, Emeritus Professor of Dermatology Albert Kligman conducted more government-sponsored chemical warfare experiments on humans than any other University researcher, a review of government documents indicates. Working at the University from 1951 to 1972, Kligman conducted scores of experiments on inmates in Northeast Philadelphia's Holmesburg Prison. Many of these experiments were conducted under the auspices of Ivy Research Laboratories, one of four research groups he founded in the mid-1960s. The research groups obtained hundreds of thousands of dollars in government and pharmaceutical industry contracts to test various chemicals on human subjects. Kligman did not return repeated phone calls placed to his home and office over the course of the past three weeks. "I like to do ground-breaking research," he said in a 1989 interview. The Dioxin Experiments Kligman performed some of the first experiments on possible ill-effects from exposure to the chemical dioxin in 1964 while under contract from Dow Chemical and the U.S. Department of Defense. Dow was seeking to determine whether dioxin exposure might have been responsible for an outbreak of chloracne -- a severe, acnelike skin disease -- among workers at a plant in Michigan which used dioxin in the manufacture of a variety of herbicides. Although Kligman acknowledges testing dioxin on prisoners at Holmesburg during 1964, he claims the records of the experiments have been destroyed. But Vernon Rowe, a former Dow worker to whom Kligman reported in the 1960s, suggested in testimony before an Environmental Protection Agency hearing in January 1981 that Kligman had exceeded dosage guidelines -- by a factor of nearly 500 times -- set by Dow and the University. Rowe testified that Dow had authorized Kligman to apply a dose of 0.2 micrograms of dioxin to the backs of 60 Holmesburg prisoners and to gradually increase the dosage to 16 micrograms. Dow believed this exposure range approximated that sustained by its Michigan plant workers. The prisoners in Kligman's dioxin study all signed consent forms, but some were later to claim in lawsuits that they were told there would be no long-term negative health effects from the experiments. In addition, prisoners who participated in the Kligman experiments would receive credits redeemable for items at the prison commissary and were told that the prison would view their actions in a favorable light, perhaps counting toward good behavior if they came up for parole. Kligman was said to have initially followed Dow's exposure guidelines for the study, but with few results. "I am grieved so little has been learned," Rowe quoted Kligman as writing him. Later, Rowe claimed in his testimony, Kligman -- without authorization from anyone at Dow -- applied 7,500 micrograms of the chemical to the skin of 10 prisoners. He said this was 468 times beyond Dow's authorized maximum exposure level. Eight of the 10 prisoners who received this dose developed cases of chloracne which lasted for over seven months. "We followed the specific protocol set down by you," Kligman allegedly wrote in his report to Rowe. "Unfortunately, not a single subject developed acne nor was there any evidence of toxicity. This encouraged me to proceed more vigorously." Since the late 1970s, research has linked dioxin to cancer, fetal deaths and birth defects. It is also a major component in Agent Orange, the defoliant used extensively by the U.S. Army in Vietnam, which has allegedly caused cancer and skin diseases in thousands of veterans. Former Holmesburg inmate James Walker, of West Philadelphia, sued Kligman and the University in 1979 alleging that he had developed lupus, a rare skin disease, after having participated in Kligman's dioxin experiments. Two years later, five more former Holmesburg prisoners filed a $6 million suit against Kligman, the University, the state of Pennsylvania and the federal government, claiming they all had suffered from outbreaks of acute rashes since participating in the dioxin study. Both suits were later settled. Kligman Banned From Human Experiments In 1966, Kligman became the first researcher in the history of the Food and Drug Administration to be banned from testing drugs on human subjects. According to an August 1966 Time magazine article, the FDA had decided that Kligman's work was sloppy and that his notes were often inconsistent. Kligman attributed his poor record keeping to the fact that he often used prisoners to monitor the experiments as well as the subjects in them. The FDA later restored Kligman's right to experiment on humans. But the FDA ban did not stop Kligman from further experimentation on human subjects with chemical agents. At about the same time the FDA was deciding that Kligman's experiments were poorly conducted, the University signed a $386,486 contract to test chemical warfare agents for the U.S. Army, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. To this day, the contract is one of the largest ever awarded for the testing of chemical warfare agents on human subjects. More Prisoners as Subjects Under this contract and several others between the Army and the University, researchers began a barrage of tests -- many conducted simultaneously -- using Holmesburg inmates as human subjects. One such program, conducted by Kligman, sought "to learn how the skin protects itself against chronic assault from toxic chemicals, the so-called hardening process," according to Kligman's 1967 report to the scientists at the Army's Edgewood Arsenal Research Laboratories in Maryland. The Army believed the study could have both offensive and defensive military applications. Kligman and his assistants worked with a variety of blister-producing chemicals, applying to prisoner's foreheads and backs, at times even immersing a subject's limbs in caustic solutions, according to a declassified 1967 report obtained from the Department of Energy. "An inescapable conclusion from all our studies is that solid hardening is obtainable only if the skin passes through a very intense inflammatory phase with swelling, redness, scaling and crusting," Kligman wrote in the report. "Once hardened, the immersions may continue indefinitely without noticeable effect." Kligman suggested in his report to the Edgewood Arsenal that the Army might consider using turpentine as a skin hardener, except that almost half of the prisoners exposed to the chemical -- often used in paint thinners -- contracted allergies. "These reactions may be quite severe when an entire forearm is involved," he wrote. Kligman reported some success in hardening subjects' skin against such chemical warfare agents as sodium lauryl sulfate and chlorinated phenol, managing to "harden" 12 inmates to both toxins for an entire year. But Kligman wrote the Army in 1967 that he was having trouble hardening prisoner's to other substances. Experiments Hospitalize Inmates All three prisoners exposed to pure ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, a highly toxic gas, "exhibited psychotic reactions (hallucinations, disorientation, stupor) within two weeks and had to be hospitalized," Kligman reported to Edgewood. Kligman concluded that no skin hardening process could prevent the psychological effects a chemical agent might have and that "hardening is short-lived, and requires continuing exposures for its peak maintenance." Kligman also reported that the study had ended prematurely when inmates "complained bitterly." "After weeks of apparently peak inflammation, the skin exhibited no willingness to become hardened and the willingness of the subjects to go on diminished to zero," Kligman wrote in a letter to Army researchers at Edgewood. The names of the subjects in the declassified report are blacked out, ostensibly to protect their identities. But the lack of knowledge about the fate of the subjects in the experiments -- or even which subjects were involved in which tests -- makes tracking any long-term health effects from the studies difficult. Kligman and other University researchers performed no long-term follow-ups on the subjects. In 1967, Kligman was also conducting research at Holmesburg for the Army under the auspices of Ivy Research Laboratories. According to a 1975 report of the Inspector General of the Army, during the late 1960s and early 1970s, "Ivy Research [Laboratories] used at least 94 inmates to test choking agents, nerve agents, blister agents, vomiting agents, incapacitating agents, and toxins." The report also stated that Ivy Research was banned from Holmesburg Prison after its tests were blamed for causing a 1972 prison riot. There are even allegations that Ivy Research was conducting radiation experiments on inmates at the time of Kligman's skin hardening tests. Allegations of Human Radiation Experiments In 1990, Edward Farrington, a former Holmesburg prisoner, filed a $6 million law suit against the University and other defendants claiming that he developed leukemia as a result of University-conducted research at Holmesburg in 1967. In his handwritten suit, Farrington alleged that radioactive material was injected at seven points along his arms and back that were marked with permanent tattoos. He alleged University researchers checked these points with a Geiger counter for several weeks. Farrington claimed that workers from the University "enticed" him into participating in the radiation study by assuring him there would be no lasting effects. He alleged that officials from the University and the prison lied about the risks of the experiment. Farrington also wrote in the suit that he could not recall what department of the University oversaw the alleged experiment, and that he could not remember the names of any of the workers, except that one was called "McBride." University lawyers initially denied any knowledge of alleged radiation research and later stated in a court filing that an investigation at the University had failed to verify Farrington's account of a University-conducted radiation experiment. In 1992, the University paid Farrington an undisclosed sum "in order to avoid the costs of litigation and to buy peace," according to former Associate General Counsel Neil Hamburg. Hamburg said at the time that the University continued to deny Farrington's allegations and that no admission of guilt was made in the settlement. In court documents, the University acknowledged that a person named McBride worked for the University in 1967, while firmly denying he had any involvement in the kinds of experiments Farrington alleged the University performed. Solomon McBride, a former University professor, was medical administrator for Kligman's Ivy Research group in 1967, at the height of its Army-contracted chemical warfare experiments, according to the 1975 Army Inspector General's report. McBride left the University and founded McWill Research Laboratories in Atlanta in 1985. He did not return several phone calls placed to his home last week. Farrington, who has been in and out of prison for a variety of crimes over the past two decades, has moved out of the Philadelphia area and also could not be reached for comment. One month before Farrington settled his suit against the University, the University reached a compromise in a two-year court battle with Johnson & Johnson and Kligman over the rights to sell the popular acne medication Retin-A as an anti-wrinkle cream. Under contract with Johnson & Johnson, Kligman developed and patented Retina-A in 1967 -- at the height of his chemical warfare experimentation with the University and Ivy Research. It is still unclear what relation, if any, Kligman's research at Holmesburg had in the development of Retina-A or in the University's development of other skin care products.


A CLASS DIVIDED: Split by war, classmates unite for first time at 50th reunion

(05/19/95 9:00am)

Fifty years after graduating from the University, Lillian Brunner is preparing to meet many of her classmates for the first time this weekend. The reason for this delayed meeting is not that Brunner was shy when she attended the University or that she was a commuter student. Rather, in 1945, campus life, like all other aspects of society, had become encompassed by the magnitude of World War II. As Brunner and the Class of 1945 gather on campus to celebrate their 50th reunion, they will at last try to bring a sense of normalcy to a class that was anything but normal. "Our class was limited in many regards," Brunner said earlier this week. "There wasn't built into it the sense of unity that I'm sure classes today have." Class President Leon King said this feeling of cohesion was not important to students who wanted to complete college before heading out to war. Students attended classes year-round so they could graduate within three years. And the University held three graduation ceremonies in 1945 for students who had to leave campus to help with the war effort. For many in the Class of 1945, though, the somber realities of war did not wait until graduation. Three credits shy of graduation, Joseph Etris Jr. departed for the battleship North Carolina in the Pacific in July 1945. After serving as a junior turret officer on the main battery of the ship, he returned to campus to finish his requirements for graduation. Despite his actual graduation date -- September 1946 -- he considers himself a member of the Class of 1945. Unlike Etris, Selma Bernstein did not fight on the front lines in the war. But she, too, participated in the war effort. While on campus, Bernstein spent hours raising money to be donated to the government's "war chest." And in the evenings, she and her sorority sisters headed to Fort Dix to dance with soldiers preparing to leave for combat overseas. The war was more than a struggle against fascism and oppression for Bernstein. Hardly a day went by that she did not think about her two younger brothers who were stationed on the front lines -- in Africa and in the the Admiralty Islands in the Pacific. "I remember getting letters from them with all these black lines," she said. "We didn't know very much about what was going on -- they were all censored." Like Bernstein, Elaine Rothschild's involvement with the war was also intensely personal. As a volunteer with the Red Cross, Rothschild's job was to translate messages from French into English about the fate of servicemen in the war. Nineteen years old at the time, she had the unenviable task of telling family members that their loved ones died in battle. Even on campus, Rothschild could not escape the ugly reminders of the atrocities of war. "The campus was filled with servicemen coming and going, and it was very depressing," she said. "We would say goodbye to someone and find out six months later that the person was killed. "It was not any kind of campus life that you guys know about," she added. "We were really cheated out of college life in those days." To Etris, classmates who died were unfortunate, but expected, casualties of war. "War is war, and it's hell," he said. "It's real bullets and real lives. "You knew that somebody wasn't going to make it," he added. "You felt really terrible, but you accepted it." Not only did war cause changes to students' routines, but the University as a whole adapted as well. Since the size of the student body shrunk considerably during the war, many courses were consolidated and condensed as a result. And because junior faculty members were drafted, full professors were conscripted for classroom duty. The courses these professors taught were often geared toward topics of war. For instance, postwar planning, flight mapping and assault strategy were popular at the time. According to Howard Golden, another member of the class, the University was also forced to accommodate the onslaught of servicemen being sent to campus. "They took over the dormitories and they took over most of the fraternity houses," Golden said. "There were more of them than there were civilians." When World War II ended, members of the Class of 1945 were left planning for their futures and coping with their losses. During this painful process, classmates never really got to know each other. "I felt that we lost something," Bernstein said. "I don't think I have the long-lasting memories that someone who went to college 10 years later would have." And this lack of class cohesion has been a problem for the reunion planning committee, King admits. "I met more people planning for the 50th anniversary than I knew on campus," he said. "There was only one person on the committee that I knew in college and only a handful that I attended class with." But Golden does not hold any grudges against the University because of his experience. "It wasn't the fault of the University -- it was the war."


U. mourns death of slain graduate

(05/19/95 9:00am)

With hushed and saddened voices, friends of 1993 University graduate Kathleen Sullivan gathered earlier this month in Houston Hall to talk about the poverty crusader's contributions to society and her tragic death. Sullivan was killed on April 11 when a drunken driver hit her as she rode her bike along Larchwood Street, near 47th Street. Those in mourning spoke of Sullivan's tireless work in fighting poverty in Philadelphia and across the country. Her friends and co-workers also said Sullivan will be missed not only by her friends and family, but also by the many lives she touched in Philadelphia's impoverished neighborhoods. Sullivan, a leader of the Kite and Key Society and founder of the Penn Volunteer Network, was always involved in community service at the University, even after she graduated, founding the Active Community Coalition Efforts Sponsored by Students. College sophomore Erika Leslie, head of Penn Volunteer Network, said Sullivan was the inspiration for her own volunteer efforts. "Kathleen was my role model," Leslie said. "She spent hours tirelessly and selflessly aiding victims of poverty. "Kathleen dedicated her short life to the betterment of humanity," she added. "She was passionate about learning, studying and understanding the world around her, both locally and internationally, so as to change the world." College friend Heather Conahan said Sullivan influenced her and others at the University. "She was the most compassionate person I'll ever know," Conahan said. "She touched my life the way no one else has." A memorial fund in Sullivan's name has been set up to continue to support the work to which she dedicated her life. Contributions made to the fund will benefit the Annie Smart Foundation, which addresses the resource needs of organizations working to combat poverty.


IFC revokes Psi Upsilon recognition

(05/19/95 9:00am)

The InterFraternity Council withdrew its recognition of the Psi Upsilon fraternity last week, according to Greek Alumni Council Chairperson Andrea Dobin. She said the IFC received information that led them to "change their mind," adding that they were "well within their rights to do that." Dobin would not specify exactly what motivated the IFC to revoke their recognition of the fraternity, but added that in response to this decision, GAC also revoked its recommendation that Psi Upsilon be recognized. The IFC granted conditional recognition to the Psi Upsilon in March, reversing a previous decision made last year that denied reinstatement of the fraternity. GAC approved the provisional recognition bid of the fraternity one night later. At that point, Psi Upsilon only had to get the administration's approval in order to return to campus. The fraternity was kicked off campus in 1990 after fraternity brothers kidnapped William O'Flanagan -- a member of Delta Psi, a rival fraternity. The Psi Upsilon brothers abducted the College student from his apartment, handcuffed him to a pole and yelled racial slurs at him. At the time, the Judicial Inquiry Office released a report which stated that throughout the two-and-a-half hour episode, O'Flanagan was "in fear of imminent serious bodily injury, and at one point, death." As a result, Psi Upsilon's national organization agreed to pay $145,000 in compensation to the Delta Psi brother. All Psi Upsilon brothers were kicked out of the Castle, the fraternity's Locust Walk home. The space is currently being used for the Community Service Living Learning Program. Upon losing recognition, some members of Psi Upsilon formed an underground fraternity known as the "Owl Society" or "Castle." In the fall of 1993, the fraternity applied for re-recognition, expressing its desire to start another chapter on campus. In order for Psi Upsilon to be allowed back on campus, the IFC, GAC and the Fraternity and Sorority Advisory Board would all have had to approve the decision. The IFC and the GAC decided against the fraternity's appeal. At the time, the GAC expressed concern over the group's connections to the "Owl Society." The council emphasized that no member of the "Owl Society" would be allowed to become a Psi Upsilon brother when they supported the fraternity in March. But now that the IFC and the GAC have withdrawn their recommendations, Psi Upsilon will have to wait until next year to bring up their case again, Dobin said.


English department may reopen Camfield's case

(05/19/95 9:00am)

There may still be hope for English Professor Gregg Camfield. In March, Camfield was denied tenure by the School of Arts and Sciences Personnel Committee. While this decision means he has to leave the University by the end of next year, his department may be able to give him another chance. According to English Professor Robert Lucid, the tenured departmental faculty will vote early next fall on the question of Camfield's renomination for tenure. "The group has already authorized a committee to prepare the case for such a renomination," he said. "And over the summer a number of scholars from other institutions will be preparing analyses of Gregg's work." This action comes after the overwhelming support Camfield received from students and faculty as a result of the committee's decision to deny him tenure. The English Undergraduate Advisory Board took immediate action by drafting a petition and talking with SAS Dean Rosemary Stevens about problems with the University's tenure process. Many students who had taken courses with Camfield felt his teaching should have carried more weight in the decision. Camfield's evaluations in the Penn Course Review consistently averaged a 4.0. Lucid added that both student support and outside consultations will be reviewed by the faculty in the fall. It is not uncommon for professors to be renominated by their departments in their seventh year. But renominations are also not always successful. According to statistics provided by SAS Associate Dean Frank Warner, of the 101 assistant professors appointed in the years 1980 to 1987 who were not granted tenure in their sixth year, 46 percent were promoted in their seventh year. Undergraduate English Chairperson Al Filreis said he supports the proposal in this case. "The resubmission process is a difficult and often unsuccessful one," he said. "In this case I think it would be warranted." Filreis added that he thinks it is important to reevaluate Camfield's case. "Gregg Camfield's work as a scholar and teacher merit our closest and most intense evaluation and indeed reexamination," he said. "I'm for it."


Safety kiosk plans near completion

(05/19/95 9:00am)

Construction on security kiosks located around campus should be completed by 5 p.m. tomorrow, according to University Police Commissioner John Kuprevich. The kiosks will serve as the primary base of operation for security officers patrolling along recently designated Community Walks, he said. Walks are major arteries of campus that will receive special monitoring by Allied Security guards. In addition to manning the kiosks, officers will also be responsible for walking around their designated areas, Kuprevich said. He added that the Department of Public Safety will set up timetables for the officers, who will be required to spend between 15 and 20 minutes of every hour "in or around" the kiosk itself. "For those other 40 minutes or so, they will be walking their patrols along the Community Walk area," he said, adding that guards will normally be within sight of their kiosks. Emergency telephones are also being installed outside of the kiosks to ensure safety at times when the officers are not stationed inside them. "If someone comes to the kiosk and it happens to be at a time when a security officer is on a patrol round, they can hit a button and the security officer should return to that site within a matter of minutes," Kuprevich said. The Community Walks program is part of the University's new master security plan, which was unveiled by University President Judith Rodin in February. According to this plan, Community Walks will run through the center of campus and along other heavily travelled off-campus routes. The five kiosks and new blue-light phones are placed at strategic points along these Walks. Kuprevich said the program is a safety initiative incorporating different security elements that allow community members to improve their own personal safety. "Our model for years has been that safety is everyone's right and everyone's responsibility," he said. While it is the University's responsibility to supply safety initiatives, it is up to individuals to utilize them, Kuprevich added. "We wanted to have places north to south, east to west, where people could feel a consistent security presence where prevention is potentially higher if they chose to use those areas," he said. The first Community Walk starts at 33rd Street at Smith Walk, continues between Meyerson Hall and the Fisher Fine Arts Library and extends into College Green. A second walk begins at the corner of 34th and Locust streets, cuts west at 36th Street and continues west along Locust Walk until 40th Street. Another walk extends from 36th and Chestnut streets down to 36th Street Locust Walk, and a fourth leads towards 37th Street. The last walk route encompasses Hamilton Walk from 38th Street, and stretches east towards 36th Street from behind the Quadrangle. Kuprevich said these areas were designated for the Community Walk program because they attract the heaviest volume of traffic on campus. He added that the Department of Public Safety will maintain its current level of patrolling in the other areas of campus. Also part of the safety plan, the University has ordered 15 more blue-light phones to be placed around campus areas "close by or near walkways so that their accessibility is increased," he added. The phones should be installed within the next several weeks. "The idea is that if something happens and someone needs to get help they should be able to look around and somewhere within 360 degrees they should see a blue-light phone," Kuprevich said. In addition, he said this new system should allow for more consistent and efficient use of the University Police officers -- both on and off campus. And while the program will not further the jurisdiction of the University Police, it will increase officers' effectiveness, Kuprevich added. As soon as the kiosks are ready, there will be signs placed along the designated areas, identifying them as "Community Walks." The signs will also bear the national symbol for town watch operations -- a blue eye.


Activists claim victory after U. ends dog labs

(05/19/95 9:00am)

After placing advertisements in area newspapers and holding a demonstration near campus, the American Anti-Vivisection Society is now claiming "victory" in the University's decision to stop demonstrating the harmful effects of narcotics on dogs. But University officials said last month that the decision to stop the demonstrations was made long before the AAVS launched its campaign against Medical School Professor Norig Ellison's use of dogs in laboratory classes. It was not until May 1, however, that the official termination papers were signed. University spokesperson Barbara Beck said she does not understand how the AAVS can take credit for the filing of these papers since the University had decided to end the dog laboratories in the fall. "They didn't win any victory. That's ridiculous," Beck said. But AAVS Outreach Director Andy Breslin said that although he had heard that there was talk of ending the labs earlier this year, "there is this kind of talk every year." It was only following the reaction from the society's advertisement, which provided Ellison's office phone number for those who wanted to complain about the labs, that the University decided to terminate the labs in writing, he said. Breslin said the ad, which ran in The Daily Pennsylvanian and City Paper, prompted Philadelphians to inundate Ellison's office with angry phone calls. "I had heard rumors that people made [bomb] threats," he added. "We didn't ever encourage anyone to make threats." Still, Breslin said, "that's what pushed them over the hill to cancel it." Breslin said AAVS contacted the University many times to find out if an official termination was in the works, and every time "we were hung up on – certified letters were ignored." Beck, however, said publicly in April that Ellison no longer used dogs in his class. "The University is constantly in search of new and different technology so animals don't have to be used at all," she said. But Breslin did not acknowledge Beck's statement. "Prior to our campaign, they would not make any official statement. I think they are trying to make us look like we are protesting a non-event," Breslin said. "I think they would strongly like to give the impression that it wasn't our victory." Beck said she wonders how the AAVS could use the word "victory" when human lives are in question. "The victory we are really talking about here is when animals are sometimes used and it results in a medical treatment that saves someone's life," she said. "We're not talking about the AAVS 'victory.' We're talking about the victory of medical research."


Provost's council to release report on undergraduate education at U.

(05/19/95 9:00am)

When the Provost's Council on Undergraduate Education releases its report for faculty review this summer, the nebulous concept of creating a 21st century undergraduate experience on campus will begin crystallizing into a set of pilot programs and student-faculty committees. Provost Stanley Chodorow said last week that PCUE's deliberations during this semester took a dual approach, focusing on the characteristics and context of a "Penn education." The group examined a wide range of the activities available to undergraduates, including service learning, access to graduate and professional schools for independent study and research, and participation in international programs such as study abroad or other "out-of-culture" experiences. PCUE members also evaluated the undergraduate advising system, opportunities for improving the use of new technology and the future of on- and off-campus residential communities. Their suggestions focus on creating coherence among disparate parts of the undergraduate experience -- for example, service learning by working on an oral history project in one of Philadelphia's ethnic communities and maintaining fluency in a foreign language through interaction with these native speakers. Chodorow also said PCUE wants students to feel comfortable with emerging electronic technologies, since students "will play a direct role in helping us to determine how to use them." University President Judith Rodin said projects on the drawing board in this area include an improved electronic information system that would enable students to register and get their grades more easily. Chodorow also said he would like to draft an admissions application to be posted and submitted by prospective students via the World Wide Web. Also included in the PCUE recommendations is a proposal for "virtual colleges" -- four-year communities composed of 200–500 students drawn from both dormitories and off-campus locations, Chodorow said. He added that this proposal -- based roughly on a plan drafted by the Residential Faculty Council in February -- is intended to "provide students with a University community of a human scale," with opportunities for leadership, social activities and academic assistance, if needed. Rodin said she is pleased with PCUE's work, adding that the group has generated broad and interesting recommendations that will be offered to the full University community for comment and input in the fall. She also said she has been struck by how much undergraduates love the University -- that they approach her on Locust Walk to tell her how excited they are to be on campus, she said. Change resulting from PCUE's work must be structured so that it "amplifies and increases the positive parts of the experience," Rodin added. "I don't think Penn has changed very much from the time I was an undergraduate," she said. "[It is] a place that offers a diverse array of opportunities. For a student who's willing to work hard to negotiate Penn, it is extraordinary in its richness -- what we want to [do] is to make it a lot easier to negotiate the system." The Council of Undergraduate Deans, acting through student-faculty committees, will manage the process of implementing pilot programs derived from PCUE suggestions during the upcoming semester, Chodorow said. He added that PCUE was able to accomplish its goal of generating a report after just one semester of work because of the "efficient and effective" work of Kim Morrisson and Robert Lucid, co-directors of the 21st Century Project on the Undergraduate Experience. Chodorow also praised the group's "unruly" and forthright discussion -- which he said often included criticism directed at him -- as well as the reports generated by committees charged with studying the state of undergraduate education at the University in previous years.


Panel: Professor's past out of bounds

(05/19/95 9:00am)

The Faculty Senate Committee on Academic Freedom and Responsibility has concluded that administrators acted improperly last fall when they questioned Economics Professor David Cass about any past sexual relationships with graduate students in evaluating his fitness to serve as acting Economics graduate chairperson. In August 1994, despite support from Economics Department Chairperson Andrew Postlewaite, Cass was denied the position of acting economics graduate chairperson because of his ongoing relationship with Claudia Stachel, a former Economics graduate student. Stachel and Cass discussed the University's sexual harassment policy when they began dating in 1989, but decided that because their relationship was consensual and Stachel was not in Cass's class, the guidelines did not apply to them. Stachel received her doctorate from the University in August 1994, just weeks before Cass's proposed appointment was rejected. According to Cass, Vice Provost for Graduate Education Janice Madden was the first to raise concerns about his proposed appointment, when she told him about rumors that he "had a pattern of dating graduate students." Madden said last fall she felt Cass's appointment as graduate chairperson would have perpetuated hostility toward women in the Economics department, and that his relationship with Stachel -- and his views on the University's sexual harassment policy -- would have made it difficult for her and other administrators to work with him. In its report, dated May 3, the Senate Committee characterizes administrators' prying into Cass's personal life as "unwise and objectionable." However, the report recommends no sanctions because the Committee did not find evidence that Cass's academic freedom had been abridged. Cass characterized the report as "too subservient to the administration" because it does not offer any suggestions that would prevent what has happened to him from recurring. University Provost Stanley Chodorow said while he was "pleased" that the Committee found the administration acted within the bounds of its authority and responsibility, he was "not happy" with its conclusion that questions about Cass's past behavior were inappropriate. "In my view, the Committee's conclusion on that point rests on a misunderstanding of the events," he said. "We are talking about the administration's right to decide who should hold an administrative position." The Committee's report was to be published in this week's Almanac, but outgoing Committee Chairperson and Political Science Professor Jack Nagel said Madden and Chodorow asked him to delay publication so that they could meet with the Committee to discuss the group's findings. "The report is a final report, and we're just delaying publication as a courtesy," Nagel said last week. "It's not that we're contemplating changing it or rescinding it." However, he added that the Committee would consider adding "an addendum or a footnote" to the report as a result of conversations with administrators because of Almanac's "right-of-reply" rule. Cass said last week he will spend the 1995-96 academic year at the European Economic Community–funded European University Institute in Florence, Italy, working on research with graduate students. He added that he had hoped the events of last fall would have been resolved by now, but believes administrators are trying to deliberately postpone publication of the report to again avoid dealing with his demands of University President Judith Rodin. Reiterated in a May 8 letter from Cass to the University's Board of Trustees, these demands are: reprimanding all administrators involved in the denial of Cass's proposed appointment, including Chodorow and Madden; removing Madden from her post as Vice Provost for Graduate Education; and apologizing and compensating Cass and Stachel for damage to their "personal and professional" reputations. "I consider the PC climate here to be incredible," Cass said. "When I come into Penn now, unlike in previous years, my stomach turns. At this point, I have absolutely no intention of ever coming back to the University to teach or do research."


U. had millions in bankrupt charity's fund

(05/19/95 9:00am)

Officials downplay potential loss Lured by promises of doubling its money in just six months, the University invested more than $2 million over the last two years with the mysterious and controversial Foundation for New Era Philanthropy, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Monday. It is not clear how much of the University's money is currently invested with New Era -- which listed $551 million in liabilities and only $80 million in assets in federal bankruptcy court filings this week -- but sources indicate that it may be in excess of $1 million. New Era, which is based in Radnor, Pa., and has offices in London and Hong Kong, promoted itself as an innovative new charity capable of doubling nonprofit institutions' money by soliciting matching funds from a pool of anonymous wealthy donors who supposedly relied on the charity to find worthy causes. Along with the University, thousands of nonprofit organizations deposited their money with New Era, which said it would hold the funds for six months in brokerage accounts -- rather than in escrow -- and claimed to be investing it in certificates of deposit or treasury bills while finding matching donors. But according to New Era's attorneys, the charity's president, John Bennett Jr., admitted to his staff last weekend that the anonymous wealthy donors, which were supposed to act as the ostensible source of funds for the charity, do not really exist. The Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission are now investigating whether New Era is anything more than an elaborate pyramid scheme orchestrated by Bennett. Pyramid or "Ponzi" schemes promise victims huge returns on their investments and produce the illusion of financial success by paying off early investors with the money donated by later victims. The scheme eventually collapses when no more investors can be found. -- or the operator disappears with the pooled funds. The state froze New Era's assets on Tuesday and moved to freeze Bennett's bank accounts on Wednesday. A six-count complaint filed by the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office Tuesday in Commonwealth Court claims New Era "misled contributing donors with regard to the extent of donor participation and the nonprofit matches" and charges the charity with violating the state's Charity Act, Consumer Protection Law and Nonprofit Law. University spokesperson Barbara Beck said Tuesday that the University General Counsel's Office is providing authorities any information they need to investigate. Beck said the University invested in New Era on the advice of several individuals close to the institution and after hearing of the tremendous returns other nonprofits were reaping from the charity. "We were invited to participate by people close to the University who have a great deal of credibility and attested to the success they had had with New Era and had others attest to the soundness of this investment," Beck said. She added that the University was aware that New Era was "slightly unorthodox," but trusted advisors close to the University. "I think it's one of our jobs to be suspicious of everything," Beck said. According to an article in Tuesday's Wall Street Journal, Vivian Piasecki, a member of New Era's Board of Directors as well as the chairperson of the Nursing School's Board of Overseers and a University Trustee, confirmed that she helped convince the University to double some of its money with the charity. A source for The Daily Pennsylvanian said Piasecki first approached Nursing Dean Norma Lang about investing in New Era. Lang and Piasecki then convinced former University President Sheldon Hackney that the University should deposit money with the charity. Hackney approved an initial investment of $600,000, the source said. In April 1993, the University wrote a $600,000 check to New Era. Two months later, the University invested an additional $300,000. In both cases, the money was doubled within six months. New Era's 1993 federal tax return, the most recent available since the charity filed for an extension on its 1994 return, states that it paid the University more than $2.1 million during that year. The charity also gave a $50,000 grant to Lang's School of Nursing, $1,000 to the Wistar Institute and $90 to the University Museum. Neither Piasecki or Lang could be reached for comment. With a $1.4 billion endowment, the University's level of involvement in New Era is far less than many smaller nonprofits that invested large portions of their total assets in the charity, Beck said. "I don't want to minimize the seriousness of this at all," she said. "I don't know the situation at other institutions that have placed a great deal at risk, but the University's level of activity is pretty small." While University's investment relative to its total assets is not substantial, the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia had deposited $2.7 million with New Era -- one-tenth of its endowment. The Esperanza Health Center, a clinic in an impoverished Hispanic neighborhood in Philadelphia, had invested $100,000, and Spring Arbor College in Spring Arbor, Mich., had turned over $1 million of its $6 million endowment to New Era to be doubled within nine months. The small college also has several hundred thousand more dollars with New Era that the charity was supposed to double in six months. A lawsuit against New Era filed by Prudential Securities Inc. in federal court on May 11 and a front page article in Monday's Wall Street Journal detailing New Era's suspicious financial dealings were the first indications that the the money many nonprofits had invested in the charity might be at serious risk. "I don't think we knew about the level of seriousness until the Journal article was published," Beck said. Prudential's suit claims New Era had borrowed $44.9 million on margin and failed to repay it on demand. The collateral for the loan was the brokerage account into which the University and other nonprofits had placed the money. The status of this account is now in dispute, as the money was used to buy treasury bills that Prudential liquidated on May 12 when New Era refused to repay the loan. Neal Colton, one of New Era's attorneys, has asked the bankruptcy court to appoint the accounting firm of Coopers and Lybrand to audit the charity's records "on an expedited basis." Auditing the records may prove a difficult task, as many accounts describe New Era's bookkeeping as lax and potentially misleading. "By their own admission, [New Era staffers] acknowledge that their books and records are disorganized and may be inaccurate," the state Attorney General's complaint states. Colton has asked that the list of New Era creditors -- numbering about 300, including up to 150 wealthy philanthropists according to bankruptcy documents -- be kept under seal to avoid unnecessary embarrassment to any of the organizations or individuals. Many who had money with New Era were shocked to learn that they may have been involved with a Ponzi scheme. Some said they were still hoping that the pool of secret donors Bennett claimed supported the foundation would come forward to bail out the charity. Beck said that if the University was taken in by New Era's claims of lavish profits, it was in good company. According to New Era's 1993 tax return and the Pennsylvania Attorney General's complaint, among the more than 2,000 nonprofits that have invested in the matching funds program since its inception in 1989 are the Boy Scouts of America, the Environmental Defense Fund, Haverford College, One to One Partnership Inc., Planned Parenthood, the Philadelphia Orchestra, Stanford University Medical School, the United Way and Yale Law School. New Era also attracted money from scores of Christian churches and evangelical groups -- particularly during the early years of the program. Bennett, a former substance abuse counselor, was a well-known figure in religious and charitable circles, serving on the boards of several Christian organizations. And many are finding it hard to believe that he may have defrauded them. "I think he will have good answers," said wealthy mutual-fund trader John Templeton in an interview with The Wall Street Journal Monday. Templeton, who like Bennett is connected to conservative Christian groups, served as a trustee of New Era's London affiliate. His son, John Templeton Jr., a surgeon at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, also donated large sums of money to New Era. University officials believed John Templeton Jr. was one of the donors matching its investment when the University first deposited money with New Era, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday. But Templeton denied he was one of the anonymous philanthropists and said he only invested in New Era in order to double his own contributions to charities. Since last weekend, Bennett has severed all ties with New Era and is not being represented by the foundation's lawyers, according to New Era attorneys.


Runners race up staircase in HRE

(05/03/95 9:00am)

Sixteen determined runners assembled in the lobby of High Rise East at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, ready to begin a climb -- billed as "450 Steps to Glory" -- up the building's center stairwell to the Rooftop Lounge. Engineering junior Jean-Philippe Gouigoux, a French exchange student from Compiegne, organized this first annual International Program High Rise Stairwell Challenge. Before the race began, he warned participants to "please warm up, because it's very tiring." A runner himself, Gouigoux occasionally completes his daily track workout with a sprint up to his room on the 19th floor. John McDonald, director of the Living Learning International Program, began the race by announcing that the winners would hold the standing world record for this event. The race was run in a time trial format, with runners starting at one minute intervals from the outside door leading into the center staircase. Engineering junior John Blouin won the race with a time of one minute, 49 seconds. Blouin, a member of the track and cross country teams, said he ran up the stairs twice in preparation, but that it only tired him out "for a few minutes." College junior Ayako Tsuzuku brought up the rear with a final time of five minutes and 35 seconds. Tsuzuku, one of the two female participants, said she had "intended to walk up." Although McDonald cautioned that "after 14 floors you start breathing like you're 100 years old," all runners arrived at the top without injury. Of the 16 participants, five were members of the International Program. But McDonald stressed that the event had been open to the entire University community. Blouin and College junior Scarlett Goon, the men's and women's first-place runners, received gift certificates for dinner for two at the New Dehli restaurant. The second and third place runners received gift certificates to Boston Chicken and McDonald's respectively. The event was sponsored by Residential Living, which provided bagels and juice for the contestants. The race was beset by a few problems. McDonald had initially planned to begin the race in front of High Rise North but modified the plan due to the narrow staircases and the potential inconvenience to High Rise East residents. In addition, when McDonald arrived at the Rooftop Lounge at 9 a.m. he found eight people asleep there. The police removed them before the event began. McDonald said he hopes to repeat the event in the fall, with computerized score-keeping and more publicity. Gouigoux said he had tried to organize races in his university and city in France, but had found little support. "This is the result of a French idea, American organization, and international participation," he explained.


Students to party at Senior Week

(05/03/95 9:00am)

After finals, many students will head home for the summer to relax at the beach or start summer internships. But for seniors, the fun is starting at the University. Senior Week 1995 will actually last for approximately a week and a half, culminating with Commencement on May 22. "We've been working on it since the fall," said College senior Leigh Molinari, the Senior Class vice president. "We're very excited about the events." According to Molinari, the week begins May 12 with an event at Dave and Buster's, an entertainment complex on Delaware Avenue. That weekend also features a trip to Six Flags Great Adventure in New Jersey and a visit to the Philadelphia Zoo. On May 14, seniors will participate in the Walnut Street Walk. And on May 15, seniors are invited to a reception with University President Judith Rodin at her home in Eisenlohr Hall. "We're excited that President Rodin will continue to hold the reception at Eisenlohr," Senior Class President Loren Mendell said. May 16 will offer a Senior Week first -- tubing on the Delaware River. Buses will be provided for all seniors. And that night, Senior Performing Arts Night will be held. On May 17, seniors will head to Atlantic City for the entire day. No other events are scheduled for that day. May 18 will be the day for Penn JobLink at CPPS. Later, the Senior Formal will take place at the Bellevue Hotel at Broad and Walnut streets. Molinari expects 1,500 people to attend. She stressed that it is not necessary to bring a date. Ivy Day will be held May 20 at 4 p.m. in Irvine Auditorium. This year's keynote speaker will be Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman. Also on May 20, the movie The Graduate, which tells the story of an aimless, confused college graduate, will be shown at midnight. Seven happy hours and thematic senior screamers are also scheduled for Senior Week, according to Molinari. The screamers include a "Where Will You Be Next Year?" celebration, in which seniors attend parties at designated establishments depending on where he or she will live in the future. Seniors have already been notified of the week's events. "The mailings went out last week, and so far, everyone is happy," Mendell said. "Now, we're just hoping for good weather."


Student to party at Senior Week

(05/03/95 9:00am)

After finals, many students will head home for the summer to relax at the beach or start summer internships. But for seniors, the fun is starting at the University. Senior Week 1995 will actually last for approximately a week and a half, culminating with Commencement on May 22. "We've been working on it since the fall," said College senior Leigh Molinari, the Senior Class vice president. "We're very excited about the events." According to Molinari, the week begins May 12 with an event at Dave and Buster's, an entertainment complex on Delaware Avenue. That weekend also features a trip to Six Flags Great Adventure in New Jersey and a visit to the Philadelphia Zoo. On May 14, seniors will participate in the Walnut Street Walk. And on May 15, seniors are invited to a reception with University President Judith Rodin at her home in Eisenlohr Hall. "We're excited that President Rodin will continue to hold the reception at Eisenlohr," Senior Class President Loren Mendell said. May 16 will offer a Senior Week first -- tubing on the Delaware River. Buses will be provided for all seniors. And that night, Senior Performing Arts Night will be held. On May 17, seniors will head to Atlantic City for the entire day. No other events are scheduled for that day. May 18 will be the day for Penn JobLink at CPPS. Later, the Senior Formal will take place at the Bellevue Hotel at Broad and Walnut streets. Molinari expects 1,500 people to attend. She stressed that it is not necessary to bring a date. Ivy Day will be held May 20 at 4 p.m. in Irvine Auditorium. This year's keynote speaker will be Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman. Also on May 20, the movie The Graduate, which tells the story of an aimless, confused college graduate, will be shown at midnight. Seven happy hours and thematic senior screamers are also scheduled for Senior Week, according to Molinari. The screamers include a "Where Will You Be Next Year?" celebration, in which seniors attend parties at designated establishments depending on where he or she will live in the future. Seniors have already been notified of the week's events. "The mailings went out last week, and so far, everyone is happy," Mendell said. "Now, we're just hoping for good weather."


Committee to screen candidates for VPUL

(05/03/95 9:00am)

Serious efforts to select a permanent Vice Provost for University Life will begin this week when a faculty-student search committee appointed to screen prospective candidates has its first meeting. Valarie Swain-Cade McCoullum, who has served as acting VPUL for the past 18 months, said last week that she is a candidate for the permanent position. Characterizing her term to date as "the most invigorating [experience] of my entire professional life," McCoullum said that as VPUL, she has enjoyed working with diverse constituencies and that she would like to continue contributing to campus life. But last March, when then-interim Provost Martin Lazerson extended McCoullum's tenure as VPUL for the 1994-95 academic year, she told The Daily Pennsylvanian that her term would "definitely end on June 30, 1995." McCoullum was unavailable for comment regarding her decision to seek the VPUL position on a permanent basis. Associate VPUL Larry Moneta refused to comment when asked whether he is seeking the position of permanent VPUL. According to Executive Assistant to the Provost Linda Koons, Mathematics Professor Dennis DeTurck, Religious Studies Professor Ann Matter, Microbiology Professor Helen Davies and Operations and Information Management Professor James Laing will serve on the VPUL Search Committee. Medical student Erick Santos and Engineering doctoral student Charles Roe will also participate in the committee's deliberations, and Koons said she expects to receive the names of undergraduates who will serve on the committee from Nominations and Elections Committee Chairperson Rick Gresh, a College senior, this week. Provost Stanley Chodorow said he decided to search internally for a permanent VPUL because of his desire to have "someone in the job who knows Penn well and who is known." He added that he does not want an outsider to make the changes in the Division of University Life that have been recommended by the Coopers & Lybrand report on administrative restructuring and will be recommended in the forthcoming report of the Provost's Council on Undergraduate Education. "I want change to be natural -- an outgrowth of how we have provided student services and of how Penn as a whole does what it does," he said. Implementation of these recommendations is expected to alter the organization of the Division of University Life and the way it delivers services to students over the next few years. But Chodorow said it is impossible to speculate on precisely how the responsibilities of the VPUL will change. "[PCUE] is setting up a process for the development of some aspects of the existing experience and of some new things," he said. "The University Life division and the job of the VPUL will help shape and be shaped by those new and expanded elements of the experience." Chodorow said the goal of reorganizing the Division of University Life is to better integrate student services into the academic programs available on campus -- thereby improving all programs. A timetable for the search process has not yet been set, and Chodorow said the pace of the search committee's progress depends on how long it takes to review candidates' files and interview them.


Violence down at Relays this year

(05/03/95 9:00am)

The University saw a decrease in violent crimes stemming from post–Penn Relay celebrations compared to the previous year, as nearly 50 University Police officers patrolled on and around campus Saturday night and early Sunday morning. Last year's celebrations were marred by reports of gunshots, stabbings and even incidents of students being dragged from cars and severely beaten. This year saw no such violence, although University and Philadelphia Police officers still responded to four separate fights that broke out Saturday night. The first began at the intersection of 34th and Walnut streets when a bottle was thrown into a vehicle at about 6:30 p.m. University Police Sergeant Tom Rambo said University Police officers dispersed the combatants but made no arrests. A second fight -- with racial overtones -- broke out at 39th and Walnut streets when several white men started chanting "O.J." at a large group of black men at about 8:45 p.m. University Police Chief George Clisby, who was at the scene, said University Police broke up the fight and arrested one man for aggravated assault. A University Police officer was injured in the leg when she intervened in the melee and had to be taken to the Hospital of the University Pennsylvania, Clisby added. The officer was treated and released. In a third incident, 10 men began fighting in front of the Wawa Food Market at 38th and Spruce streets shortly after 11 p.m. The fight then spilled out into the street, prompting University Police to break up the brawl. No arrests were made. And nearly 30 minutes later University Police officers broke up the fourth fight at 38th and Chestnut streets. Again, no arrests were made. Prior to the Relays, University Police Commissioner John Kuprevich said that his department would be at "maximum" staffing levels during the track meet. He also said Philadelphia and University Police officers would be highly concentrated along Spruce Street between 34th and 38th streets and at 40th and Chestnut streets for the party sponsored by members of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity who live in the area. More than 1,000 people were at the Kappa Alpha Psi party, as some 25 police officers contained the crowd to the north sidewalk of Chestnut Street between 40th and 41st streets. University Police Sergeant Keith Christian said there were no incidents at the party, which continued past 4 a.m. Last year, partygoers blocked traffic for hours as the party spread into the streets. Police also said that last year there were a number of reports of gunshots and motorists being harassed at this corner.


Juniors romp through rite of passage at Hey Day

(05/03/95 9:00am)

" '96 is taking over, baby." Those were the words chanted by the Junior Class as they began the traditional Hey Day march that would take them from Hill Field to the Quadrangle to College Green and finally, to seniorhood. Clad in red T-shirts and armed with wooden canes, members of the Class of 1996 streamed out on to Locust Walk on a mission and nothing was going to get in the way. Their day had finally come. The annual Hey Day festivities officially started at noon Friday with a picnic at Hill Field, but the juniors were more interested in taking bites out of each other's styrofoam hats than anything that Dining Services could serve up. Laughing and dancing under the blazing sun, the class came together for the first time since Freshman Convocation in 1992. Squeals of joy rang out as students recognized old friends and classmates whom they had not seen in years. There was a lot of catching up to do. "It's a total freshman year reunion -- my whole freshman hall is here," College junior Jessica Basil said. "We're becoming friends with people we don't know, too." At 3 p.m. the mostly-inebriated crowd managed to arrange themselves into something that vaguely resembled a line at the gate of the field. A few who decided to break with tradition and don blue shirts and shower caps were noticeable drifting amid the overwhelming sea of red shirts and white hats. With Junior Class President Lenny Chang at the front of the line, the crowd began to proceed up Locust Walk, cheered on by the hundreds of spectators who had turned out to celebrate with them. The excitement was contagious. Even the slightly confused Penn Relay participants stopped stretching on College Green to join in the festivities. It took almost a half hour for the throng to make its way to the Quad, stopping frequently to dance with the Quaker band and bang their canes on everything and everyone in sight. The group then converged on the Junior Balcony. Several engaged in mock swordfighting on the way up the Quad steps, while the rest continued their celebration. "When I was a freshman, I knew what was going on, but I never imagined it would be this much fun," College junior Michael Katz said. "You don't get to wreak havoc on Penn like this everyday." By 4 p.m. the class made its way down Spruce Street, through Superblock, and across the bridge. They assembled on College Green, drinking out of mugs, cans, bottles -- and even fishbowls. A roar erupted from the crowd when President Judith Rodin appeared, wearing her own styrofoam hat. "It looks to me like the Class of '96 is ready," said Rodin, who had to wait a few minutes for the screams to die down before she could continue with her speech. "And so may I say to you, by the powers invested in me by the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania, I now declare you seniors!" The band immediately began a rousing rendition of the "Red and Blue" and the crowd jubilantly waved their canes to perform the Penn salute. Next up at the podium was Class of 1995 President Loren Mendell, who presented the ceremonial gavel to his successor, Chang, a Wharton junior. But before the ceremony was over, Mandell had a favor to ask. "I'm going to ask you to share your seniority with us, because none of us want to graduate," he said. "For the next three weeks, until May 22, there are going to be four thousand seniors." Chang's speech was also brief and his words were barely audible over the boisterous crowd. "Class of '96, we finally made it," he said. "We are finally seniors." After introducing next year's class board, Chang exited the podium, riding on the shoulders of his fellow classmates. The crowd took a while to disperse, as many remained on College Green long after the ceremony ended. "Hey Day is the point at which you realize how near the rest of your life is," College and Engineering junior Chip Keener said. "You have one more year left -- and then you enter the real world. "So, of course it's a reason to party," he added.


Topol sexual harassment suits settled

(05/03/95 9:00am)

Terms are confidential A settlement was reached last week in three sexual harassment suits filed by a former University student who was romantically involved with one of her professors. The student, Lisa Topol, accused former Assistant English Professor Malcolm Woodfield of harassment after their three-month affair ended in the spring of 1993. Terms of the settlement are confidential, according to University General Counsel Shelley Green. "The parties have agreed to resolve their differences," Green said. "This ends the process -- all of the litigation." Topol's attorney, Alice Ballard, confirmed that no further action is expected on any of her client's complaints. In March 1994, Topol filed suit against the University, charging that administrators had failed to resolve her harassment complaint in a timely manner. Proceedings in that case were expected to begin in federal district court last month. Topol also had suits pending against Woodfield in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court and against Bates College in Maine, where Woodfield taught for two years before coming to the University. She contended that Bates withheld information about Woodfield's conduct there -- including allegations of sexual harassment leveled by students there. Woodfield resigned in April 1994, after admitting that he had had sex with Topol while she was a student in his class, making their relationship in violation of the University's sexual harassment policy. In March of this year, U.S. District Court Judge Anita Brody ruled during the pre-trial discovery period that Topol would have to turn over as evidence the diary she kept during her involvement with Woodfield. The University believed the contents of Topol's diary would discredit her claims of harassment and prove that her relationship with Woodfield had been consensual. During the spring of 1993, Topol had shared some of the diary with then-Ombudsman Daniel Perlmutter and Assistant Ombudsman Gulbun O'Connor. Ballard contested the University's motion to gain access to the diary, claiming that since Topol had been advised to record her thoughts by Penn Women's Center personnel, the patient-psychotherapist privilege protected any information the book contained. But Ballard said earlier this week that the University did not get to view the diary after all. The Woodfield-Topol case, with its conflicting allegations of illicit sex and abuse of power, has become somewhat of a cause cZlebrZ in the media. It spawned a lengthy feature in Philadelphia magazine last fall and was one of the focal stories in a Time magazine piece about student-professor relationships last month. Additionally, as a result of fallout from the case, the University's Faculty Senate recently approved a draft policy forbidding all sexual relationships between students and faculty members.


Cancer Center granted $14.6 million

(05/03/95 9:00am)

The National Cancer Institute has granted the University Cancer Center $14.6 million to be spent over a period of five years. The Center, one of only 26 in the country, has been approved as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the NCI for more than 20 years. Cancer Center Director John Glick said in a statement that he is pleased at NCI's decision to acknowledge the Center. "I am delighted that the National Cancer Institute has reaffirmed its confidence in the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center," he stated. He added that he views the grant as an award for the continuing strength and development of new research. "We are one of the nation's leading Comprehensive Cancer Centers, and this award recognizes and confirms our excellence in innovative cancer research," he explained. The grant will be divided among 12 of the Center's research programs -- including those focusing on fundamental, clinical, cancer control and developing research. More specifically, it will provide for such areas as DNA sequencing, tumor cell biology, pediatric oncology and gene therapy. In addition, Glick said the grant provides for state-of-the-art technology needed for cancer research. Harriet Goodstein, director of finance and personnel, said the grant enables the Center to incorporate research with patient care. "It is a very important grant to support translational research which will take research from the laboratory to patient care," she said. Goodstein added that the grant is necessary for the continuation of cancer research. "It's the integral part of the Cancer Center's funding budget," she said. "It would be very difficult to do the type of research that is being done without this cancer research support grant." Not only does the grant give credit to the Center's research, it will also encourage more research, Glick said last night. "First, it is a critically important grant that provides a mark of distinction for our research accomplishments," he added. "Secondly, this grant really provides the glue that holds the Center together. We use these funds to provide research infrastructure and to facilitate cancer research throughout the campus." With the aid of an additional four-year planning grant, the development of a Breast Cancer Research Program -- emphasizing the genetic aspects of breast cancer research -- will be possible.


Remains of mutilated animal found in garbage near Hillel

(05/03/95 9:00am)

Several animal rights activists reported finding the severed head and skin of what appeared to be a sheep in a garbage facility behind the Hillel Foundation on Saturday afternoon. The animal's remains were wrapped in a bloodstained sheet, along with a notebook, two broken beer bottles, two blue candles and a white rose. On the blood-splattered notebook the following was written: The fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta, hereby, relinquish any liability for the undersigned on the night of April 28, 1995. Thirteen signatures were written underneath the message. Two of the signatures appeared to read Joseph Mauro and John Ward. The other eleven signatures were illegible. Ward, a Wharton freshman, said he had no knowledge of the dead animal or the note and refused further comment. Mauro, a College freshman, also said he had no knowledge of the remains or note, but he confirmed that he was a Fiji brother initiated on April 19. A person in the Fiji house who identified himself as the fraternity's president, but refused to give his name, said he had no knowledge of the remains and declined further comment. The dead animal was found 50 feet from the Fiji house at 3619 Locust Walk. University Police responded to the scene at about 3:07 p.m, at which time University Police Detective Supervisor Mike Carroll said he believed the animal was not freshly killed. He said the individuals responsible for the remains could be not be charged with the crime of cruelty to animals if the animal had been killed in a slaughterhouse or by a butcher. University Police Detective Laura Schmerfeld said the animal's severed head was professionally sawed in half, with equipment typically found in a slaughterhouse or butcher shop. The remains were transported to the Veterinary School of Medicine to determine when the animal was killed, Carroll said. He added that there is an ongoing University Police investigation into the incident. The animal remains were discovered by Philadelphia resident Melvin Belser. He said he originally thought the remains were a mop head, but on closer inspection he realized it was an animal's head and skin. Belser said he then told several animal rights activists in front of Van Pelt Library, who coincidentally were protesting the alleged use of dogs in medical training classes by the University. The activists then notified University Police. Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs Tricia Phaup refused to comment on the incident Sunday afternoon.