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Quakers run over Brown

(10/24/94 9:00am)

Football blanks Bears, 24-0 PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- If only the script had opened differently, said Brown coach Mark Whipple, his Bears may have upset the Penn football team. But the Quakers capitalized on their opportunities early and waltzed to a 24-0 victory Saturday at Brown Stadium. The Quakers (5-0, 3-0 Ivy League) keep pace with Cornell, which also improved to 3-0 in the league by coming from behind to beat Dartmouth, 17-14. The game could have been a scene from any of the Bears' Ivy League losses. Despite improvement, Brown (3-3, 0-3) does not have the talent yet to contend for an Ivy title. It also does not have the confidence to play with its opponents once it gets behind. "Our kids were ready to play, but we haven't played in many big games," Whipple said. "We built this thing up big. Their nervousness and inexperience showed." First-year coach Whipple, who served as an assistant to Penn coach Al Bagnoli at Union, has installed a "whip-lash" offense at Brown. It averaged 52.5 points per game last year at New Haven, where Whipple spent six seasons, but was little match for Penn. Dropped passes and mental errors plagued Brown again, just like two weeks ago when the Bears had a chance to take a 17-10 lead late in the third quarter against Princeton. In that situation, Trevor Yankoff dropped a pass in the end zone and Brown collapsed, falling 31-10. The Penn defense frustrated the Bears during the first few series, allowing only 45 total yards in the first half. The Quakers pitched their first shutout during their current 17-game winning streak, which ties them with idle Auburn for the longest in Division I. Penn has blanked the Bears in four of the last eight meetings. Penn sacked Brown quarterback Jason McCullough (9 for 28, 128 yards) three times. And when the Quakers weren't sacking McCullough, they were hurrying him. Brown has allowed 29 sacks this season. Late in the first quarter, senior Chris Johnson hit McCullough as the quarterback released a pass. The ball fluttered in the air and junior Dana Lyons came up with the interception. Three plays later, sophomore quarterback Mark DeRosa (14 for 23, 163 yards, 1 TD) lofted a 16-yard touchdown pass to junior Miles Macik, who reached around safety Karl Lozanne for the score. That staked the Quakers to a two-touchdown lead with 2 minutes, 14 seconds remaining in the first quarter, and tied Macik with Don Clune for the school record for touchdowns in a career with 17. It also destroyed any remaining confidence the Bears had. "We had to make a big play early in the game to maybe stun them a little bit, and then play good defense," Whipple said. "They took us out of it early with the two first touchdowns, and that's what good teams do." Penn started the scoring 3:58 into the game when senior Terrance Stokes took the last of three straight handoffs and punched the ball in the end zone. Stokes left the game just before halftime with a mild concussion, but said he could have played in the second half had the game been closer. The Quakers opened up a 21-0 lead when Stokes took a fourth-and-one handoff from the Brown 3 through the right side of the line and into the end zone 9:10 before intermission. Stokes touched the ball each time during the four-play drive, which was set up when sophomore Mark Fabish returned a punt 41 yards to the Brown 12. Senior Andy Glockner added a 39-yard field goal five seconds before halftime, which gave the Quakers the 24-0 final margin of victory. The Penn defense was on the field the majority of the second half, but Brown was unable to score. Senior Michael Juliano blocked a Bob Warden field-goal attempt in the third quarter that preserved the shutout. Juliano also blocked a critical extra point at Dartmouth to preserve a Penn victory in Week 2. Brown running back Marquis Jessie returned to the Bears lineup sooner than expected after missing two games following surgery for a mild hernia. Jessie rushed for 64 yards on 18 carries, and was contained well except for one 30-yard scamper after Brown's confidence was shaken. "They can make a big play out of any play they run," senior Pat Goodwillie said. "We were fortunate that they really didn't have a whole lot of big plays against us. That really was the story of the game for us."


Quakers run over Brown

(10/24/94 9:00am)

Football blanks Bears, 24-0 PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- If only the script had opened differently, said Brown coach Mark Whipple, his Bears may have upset the Penn football team. But the Quakers capitalized on their opportunities early and waltzed to a 24-0 victory Saturday at Brown Stadium. The Quakers (5-0, 3-0 Ivy League) keep pace with Cornell, which also improved to 3-0 in the league by coming from behind to beat Dartmouth, 17-14. The game could have been a scene from any of the Bears' Ivy League losses. Despite improvement, Brown (3-3, 0-3) does not have the talent yet to contend for an Ivy title. It also does not have the confidence to play with its opponents once it gets behind. "Our kids were ready to play, but we haven't played in many big games," Whipple said. "We built this thing up big. Their nervousness and inexperience showed." First-year coach Whipple, who served as an assistant to Penn coach Al Bagnoli at Union, has installed a "whip-lash" offense at Brown. It averaged 52.5 points per game last year at New Haven, where Whipple spent six seasons, but was little match for Penn. Dropped passes and mental errors plagued Brown again, just like two weeks ago when the Bears had a chance to take a 17-10 lead late in the third quarter against Princeton. In that situation, Trevor Yankoff dropped a pass in the end zone and Brown collapsed, falling 31-10. The Penn defense frustrated the Bears during the first few series, allowing only 45 total yards in the first half. The Quakers pitched their first shutout during their current 17-game winning streak, which ties them with idle Auburn for the longest in Division I. Penn has blanked the Bears in four of the last eight meetings. Penn sacked Brown quarterback Jason McCullough (9 for 28, 128 yards) three times. And when the Quakers weren't sacking McCullough, they were hurrying him. Brown has allowed 29 sacks this season. Late in the first quarter, senior Chris Johnson hit McCullough as the quarterback released a pass. The ball fluttered in the air and junior Dana Lyons came up with the interception. Three plays later, sophomore quarterback Mark DeRosa (14 for 23, 163 yards, 1 TD) lofted a 16-yard touchdown pass to junior Miles Macik, who reached around safety Karl Lozanne for the score. That staked the Quakers to a two-touchdown lead with 2 minutes, 14 seconds remaining in the first quarter, and tied Macik with Don Clune for the school record for touchdowns in a career with 17. It also destroyed any remaining confidence the Bears had. "We had to make a big play early in the game to maybe stun them a little bit, and then play good defense," Whipple said. "They took us out of it early with the two first touchdowns, and that's what good teams do." Penn started the scoring 3:58 into the game when senior Terrance Stokes took the last of three straight handoffs and punched the ball in the end zone. Stokes left the game just before halftime with a mild concussion, but said he could have played in the second half had the game been closer. The Quakers opened up a 21-0 lead when Stokes took a fourth-and-one handoff from the Brown 3 through the right side of the line and into the end zone 9:10 before intermission. Stokes touched the ball each time during the four-play drive, which was set up when sophomore Mark Fabish returned a punt 41 yards to the Brown 12. Senior Andy Glockner added a 39-yard field goal five seconds before halftime, which gave the Quakers the 24-0 final margin of victory. The Penn defense was on the field the majority of the second half, but Brown was unable to score. Senior Michael Juliano blocked a Bob Warden field-goal attempt in the third quarter that preserved the shutout. Juliano also blocked a critical extra point at Dartmouth to preserve a Penn victory in Week 2. Brown running back Marquis Jessie returned to the Bears lineup sooner than expected after missing two games following surgery for a mild hernia. Jessie rushed for 64 yards on 18 carries, and was contained well except for one 30-yard scamper after Brown's confidence was shaken. "They can make a big play out of any play they run," senior Pat Goodwillie said. "We were fortunate that they really didn't have a whole lot of big plays against us. That really was the story of the game for us."


A FRONT ROW VIEW: Quakers rely on their experience

(10/20/94 9:00am)

The Pennsylvania Quakers football team wins. It is that simple. After the dynasty in the 1980s, when the Quakers won five consecutive Ivy League titles, coach Al Bagnoli has brought back that winning attitude. Bagnoli's squads, which have only lost only three games during his two-plus years at the helm, believe they are invincible. They come out expecting to win every single contest. Why shouldn't they? They have not lost a game since 1992. So when the Quakers marched onto the turf of Franklin Field Saturday to face the traditionally hapless Columbia Lions, why should they have expected anything less than another victory? These are the same Lions, after all, who hold the Division I record for consecutive losses. "Winning is an attitude," Columbia safety Jim Hudnall said. "They have an attitude. You can see it when they walk on the field. They expect to win." But what transpired Saturday was nothing short of a miracle. The Lions came out fired and ready to knock off the defending league champions. The Quakers calmly went through the motions, with little, if any, emotion. The Lions ripped through the field on their first possession to take an early 3-0 lead. The Quakers calmly came back and tied the game. "We weren't really that concerned," senior running back Terrance Stokes said about the halftime attitude in the Penn locker room. "We weren't concerned about losing.?We figured things would eventually go our way." So the second half was not the same as the first half. The Quaker defense once again shut down the opposition. The defense, which starts eight seniors and three juniors, knows how to win games. Those 11 men realize when the offense has only put three points on the scoreboard by halftime, it is up to them to control the game. Just like in every other game, the defense once again saved the game. As the intensity picked up, the Quakers only allowed the Lions past midfield once in the second half. But even this outstanding performance was not enough to ignite the dormant Penn offense. However, the Quakers did get close enough to the Columbia end zone to connect on four field goals. Every time Penn faced a long third down, Mark DeRosa found the sure hands of all-American wide receiver Miles Macik. After one seemingly perfect third-down conversion, Columbia linebacker Jim Lill grabbed his helmet in disbelief. Then Bagnoli looked to his sure-footed kicker -- Andy Glockner. Once again, an experienced senior came through in the clutch. "They play with a tremendous amount of intensity," Holy Cross coach Peter Vaas said last week. "That comes from having been exposed to success in the past. When you have success, success breeds success." And when you lose, that losing attitude snowballs. So down by six midway through the fourth quarter, the Lions should have known what was coming -- another 'L.' But the Lions had a chance on a fourth-and-long situation. But then again, this is Columbia. "I think you have to learn to win in these types of games," Bagnoli said. "We've been through plenty of close games with 17-14 and 34-30 scores, and that's something that just evolves. I give the Columbia team credit, but it just takes a little time to be able to win in those tight situations." And that is what Saturday's game eventually came down to -- the Quakers know how to win, the Lions just do not. Joshua Friedman is a College senior from Beverly Hills, Calif., and sports editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian.


A FRONT ROW VIEW: The Madness began already

(10/20/94 9:00am)

Well, the line for Monday's basketball season-ticket sale has begun, and by the time you read this there will be Penn students lined up outside the Palestra. The funny thing is, even before you could have read this column, or the advertisement announcing the ticket sale on page B4, there were fans snatching the front-row seats. Upset that some students knew when tickets would go on sale weeks ago, even though the athletic department promised to give out tickets equitably? You should be. The athletic department tried to take into account students' concerns after fiascos in previous years. And for the most part it should be congratulated, because it did. However, on the most crucial point -- the timing of the announcement about how tickets would be distributed -- the athletic department dropped the ball. There would have been no use for inside information if the Penn ticket office said four weeks ago tickets would be sold Monday, Oct. 24. But a problem does arise when the athletic department announces it four days before tickets go on sale. Students will camp out four days for basketball season tickets, but not four weeks. Not at Penn. Not at Duke. The athletic department's reasoning is security. Truth be told, that is a valid concern. University officials worried they would be responsible for the safety of those students who chose to skip four weeks of class and their fall break to camp out for tickets. The athletic department should have splurged for an unemployed McGinn security guard for the four weeks. If it charged $90 for season tickets again this year instead of cutting the price $10, the athletic department could have financed the cost of the guard?and avoided what should again be outrage over the distribution of tickets. Give the athletic department an 'A' for effort. Fail them for execution. Penn fans are a dedicated bunch, and maybe a couple would have camped out a few weeks. But no one would have been the beneficiary of information had the announcement of how tickets would be distributed been made earlier. The truth is, the McGinn guard would have had no one to watch four weeks before tickets were to go on sale, and could have taken an extended nap. Hey, at least the best tickets are only $80 this season. Adam Rubin is a Wharton senior from Bellmore, N.Y., and sports editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian.


NICK MORRIS: The Dark Side

(10/11/94 9:00am)

You try to catch his attention after a long day of practice. You yell to him, "Nick," but there's no response. You try again, "Nick Morris," but still no acknowledgment. Then you hear someone behind you yell, "Hey Luke Skywalker," and he instantly turns around. During his two-year varsity football career at Penn, Nick Morris has played so many different roles, most of the time time he did not even know who he was. But now, the once highly recruited quarterback has settled into his starting strong safety position. The defense, which wears dark uniforms during practice, has brought Morris over to the Dark Side. "It's a lot nicer," he says of playing everyday. "It was fun, but it was a little bit of a struggle not knowing whether I was going to get into the game. Now that I have a position, I have the security to know that I'm going to play a full game." Even though Morris now has a permanent position, that still does not mean he is going to play every down. This fact has been made all too apparent as he has suffered through an injury-riddled career. After earning Freshman Most Valuable Player honors while playing quarterback, he hurt his ankle in the last game of the season, forcing him to forego trying out for the baseball team. Then he red-shirted his sophomore year after tearing the tendons in the middle finger of his throwing hand. And although he didn't feel comfortable throwing the ball last season because he could not put pressure on his finger, he still was the Quakers' returning passing leader this fall. But last year, when he did take the snaps, more often than not, he took off running with the pigskin. "I always liked to run," Morris says. "I just didn't have confidence in my throwing ability. But I had confidence in my legs and that I could hit somebody." His desire to hit convinced defensive coordinator Mike Toop to woo Morris to defense when starting free safety Sheldon Philip-Guide broke his arm last season. "Most people don't realize that we basically took an offensive player and taught him the free safety position," Toop says. "That's a tremendous feat, but he was able to do that." And as the season progressed, the move looked better every week. Morris is a devastating hitter. And although he had difficulty adjusting to his new position, he still made some of the biggest plays of the year. In the final game, with an undefeated season hanging in the balance and down by 14 points at halftime, Morris stepped into the spotlight. On a pass intended for Cornell wide receiver Erik Bjerke, Morris snagged the interception and ignited a previously dormant Penn offense. "Nick made a hell of a play on that ball," then-Penn quarterback Jim McGeehan said. "He stepped up and made the biggest play of the year." Morris then found a way to top that play. With the Big Red marching for the winning touchdown late in the contest, he dragged down Cornell tailback Pete Fitzpatrick two yards short of the first-down marker on a key third down. These are the types of hits Morris always seems to deliver -- just ask senior cornerback Jamie Daniels, who felt his wrath earlier this season. "I should have got it still. But Nick is a great hitter, and he proved it on that play," Daniels said after trying to hold onto an interception when he was leveled by Morris. "I just thought about going after the ball," Morris says now. "I didn't even realize what was going on. I just ran into him. One thing I want to do is be more physical." This craving to hit was one of the reasons Morris moved to the defensive side of the ball. As a quarterback, he got sick of being a target for offensive linemen. As a wide receiver, he grew tiresome of being the prize possession of defensive backs. But as the strong safety for the undefeated, defending Ivy League champion Pennsylvania Quakers, he now gets to deliver the hits. The crunches. The devastating blows. The crushes. This is the mind set of a defender. This is the thinking of someone who has switched to the Dark Side.


Princeton wins with maturity

(10/10/94 9:00am)

PRINCETON, N.J. -- Dave Oliveira heard the optimistic shouts from the Brown football locker room. It wasn't hard with the Princeton Tigers preparing in quiet, business-like fashion. Oliveira saved his noise for the field, recording 4.5 of the Tigers' school-record 11 sacks as Princeton took a close game and turned it into a 31-10 rout Saturday at Palmer Field. It was a game both teams needed to win in order to keep hopes of an Ivy championship alive. It was a game the Tigers (3-1, 1-1 Ivy League) knew how to win, and Brown (2-2, 0-2) did not. An interception by Ryan Moore at the Princeton one-yard line, followed by an 85-yard scamper by Marc Washington broke the 10-10 game open. It led to a C.J. Brucato five-yard touchdown run late in the third quarter which put the Tigers up 17-10. "We just lost our confidence at that point," Brown coach Mark Whipple said. "We just haven't won that many games at Brown lately to overcome a big play like that." As much as anything, the difference in the game was experience. Yes, Brown returned 22 of 24 starters this year, and the Tigers less than half that, but Princeton knows how to win. Say what you want about Keith Elias, but he left a legacy of hard work. "We had guys stepping into starting roles who are seniors and juniors," Princeton coach Steve Tosches said. "And yes, they're inexperienced on the field, but they've been a part of this program. And they saw how an Elias got himself ready to play." Whipple, who has clearly revitalized Brown, does not have a championship-caliber squad yet, and will have to play spoiler. On the field, Brown quarterback Jason McCullough had little time to pass as the Tigers applied constant pressure. Talented Bears tailback Marquis Jesse missed the game after having surgery earlier in the week for a hernia. Tosches knew the Brown offense, which relies heavily on the pass, would be even more reliant on the air game. Jesse may be out as much as three to four weeks, in which case he will miss the Oct. 22 game against Penn at Franklin Field. Trevor Yankoff, who was demoted to second-string quarterback, played his second game at wide receiver for the Bears. He dropped a sure touchdown pass in the end zone that would have given Brown a lead early in the third quarter. "We built this game up as a big game," Whipple said. "We didn't make any bones about it -- if we lost it, we didn't have any chance of winning an Ivy League championship.?We have a really young football team mentally, and it really came down to the mental-toughness part." In other games around the Ivy League: Dartmouth 27, Lafayette 15 -- Big Green quarterback Ren Riley broke his arm in three places after he was hit by Rawle Howard. Riley will have surgery later this week. Jerry Singleton and Jon Aljancic will compete in practice for the starting quarterback spot. The Big Green improved to 2-2, 0-1. Lafayette is 0-5. Cornell 18, Harvard 13 -- Cornell won its fourth straight game for its best start since 1971 by defeating Harvard in Boston. Chad Levitt rushed 30 times for 227 yards and gave the Big Red (4-0, 2-0) the lead with a one-yard TD run with 1:06 to play. Levitt is the first Cornell player since 1988 to rush for 200 yards. Harvard is 2-2, 1-1. Columbia 24, Fordham 13 -- Jamie Schwalbe completed 21 of 27 passes for 257 yards leading the Lions (2-1-1, 0-1) to the victory in Bronx, N.Y. It is Columbia's first winning record this late in the season since 1978. Fordham is 0-6. Lehigh 36, Yale 32 -- Engineers quarterback Bob Aylsworth passed for a Yale Bowl-record 454 yards and three touchdowns. Yale led 12-0, as Lehigh (3-1-1) turned over the ball on its first four possessions. Yale (3-1, 1-0) suffered its first loss of the season. Keith Price rushed for 101 yards for the Elis, his second straight 100-yard performance.


CRUSADER QB CONTROVERSY? Callahan finally given starting nod over Fitzpatrick

(10/06/94 9:00am)

Like a baseball closer, he waits until the late innings to come into the game. He follows the coach around sporting a clipboard and baseball cap. But unlike most backup quarterbacks, Rob Callahan has actually had an opportunity to play. Although he has not started one game for winless Holy Cross this season, Callahan has made an appearance in every contest. With the offense struggling, Crusader coach Peter Vaas has found himself looking over his shoulder and calling for No. 14 more than ever. And now, facing the Quakers Saturday, Callahan will finally get his chance to start. "It feels pretty good," he said. "This is when the work finally pays off. It's been a little frustrating, but you have to accept the decisions made by the coaches and take advantage of your opportunities when they come." This is how Callahan has been approaching his role throughout his career. As a freshman, his playing time was limited to the junior varsity squad. As a sophomore, he took only four snaps. But after starting quarterback Andy Fitzpatrick suffered a season-ending knee injury against Bucknell last year, Callahan led the previously 1-6 Crusaders to a 2-2 mark the rest of the season. But then in the spring, Fitzpatrick was handed his starting job again. At 6-foot-4, 215 pounds, Fitzpatrick appears to be the ideal size for quarterback. And during the 1993 campaign, he had completed 55.6 percent of his passes, including six touchdowns without an interception. However, in 1994, the offense has not been producing. Against Army, the Crusaders scored no points. Against Massachusetts, they produced three points. And against Yale, they were outscored by 25 points. After not landing the ball in the end zone during the first half last week against Harvard, Vaas called for Callahan. "The offense just wasn't moving the ball," Callahan said. "I'm glad the team responded to me when I came in. We were able to move the ball pretty well." Callahan orchestrated two second-half touchdowns against the Crimson. After that, Vaas gave Callahan the nod for this weekend's matchup. "It's just a change," Holy Cross quarterbacks coach Tom Caito said. "We need to get some spark into our offense. Callahan moved the ball against Harvard. He scored two touchdowns. He's doing a good job." But Callahan's success to date has led to a quarterback controversy in Worcester, Mass. Fitzgerald was the Patriot League Rookie of the Year in 1992; Callahan sat on the sidelines. Fitzgerald excelled last season; Callahan waited for his opportunity to shine. Now the roles are reversed. "I don't know if there is a controversy," Callahan said. "We just scored a couple touchdowns when I was in there. The team needs a couple changes, so the coaches are trying some different things. "We've stayed friendly. You can't let it bother you. We're both competitive, but we just don't let it get involved in our personal relationship." Saturday, Callahan will have to concentrate on the Quaker defense. He will have to watch for Michael Turner coming in from the outside. He will have to watch for Jamie Daniels covering the Crusader wide receivers. But Callahan's greatest threat may be waiting on the bench, sporting a baseball cap with clipboard in hand.


Swim teams lose another

(09/28/94 9:00am)

Junior Geoff Munger had the desire to spend hours racing in the pool, until the drive left him over the summer. Now he's leaving the men's swimming team. "This program just kind of killed it," he said. "It wouldn't have mattered who was coaching. The fun was out of it." Munger is the latest in a number of men and women swimmers who have quit the team over conflicts with coach Kathy Lawlor-Gilbert. The next wave of defectors will be known Friday, when the swimmers formally assemble for the first time this season. "I really don't know who's going to show up," said senior Jim McGinnis, who will return despite signing a petition last semester which called the program "primitive in theory." In the last two years, both the men's and women's teams have submitted petitions to the athletic department requesting Lawlor-Gilbert's resignation. In October 1993, six women swimmers quit, and last season the women forfeited the diving events. For Munger the problem began last season. "Things started going wrong where I just started seeing that she didn't offer any coaching," he said. His departure will be particularly painful for the men's squad. "I would define Munger as a swimmer," McGinnis said. "In the past he was one of the most 'rah-rah' guys. That really saddens me." Instead Munger will play water polo because his affection for the water, unlike the affection for his coach, has not dissipated. "I'm pretty terrible at it. I've got the swimming part of it down, but these guys who play it are pretty good," Munger said. "I identify myself as a swimmer," he added. "I introduce myself to people, 'Hi, I'm Geoff Munger. I'm a swimmer.' And just to be completely out of the water was such a huge change." Other swimmers are considering quitting the Penn team and joining club squads in Philadelphia. · When athletic director Steve Bilsky took office July 1, he inherited the problem which has had tremendous tensions for more than three years. He said he will stand by Lawlor-Gilbert for now and attempt to resolve the differences. "Kathy Gilbert is the coach and we're expecting a good season," Bilsky said. "We're trying to work with the swimmers and the coach to identify areas where we can all make the situation better. And I expect that everybody will give it their best effort. "As far as the situation that I inherited, there's nothing that I could have done about swimming back in March or April. All I can concentrate on is from July on, when I started working." Many feel that it is too late to salvage the messy situation, and that Lawlor-Gilbert is not qualified to be a Division I coach. Some swimmers have not contacted Lawlor-Gilbert since returning from summer vacation. "The apathy of the swim team has hit rock bottom," sophomore Ken Fletcher said. "There is no team unity. Some guys haven't even been around the pool yet." Geoff Munger decided not to stay away from the pool, only the swim team.


Defensive overwhelms Leopard attack

(09/19/94 9:00am)

Lafayette entered Franklin Field as the proud favorite to win the Patriot League title. With all-American Erik Marsh leading the offense, there was no doubt the Leopard offense would put points on the board. Doubt crept into the Lafayette locker room Saturday courtesy of last season's best defense in the Ivy League. The Leopard offense, which averaged 24.6 points per game a year ago, was unable to produce any offensive points the entire contest. The Quaker defense did something even last year's squad could not accomplish --Eshut an opponent out. "We play for a shut out every time we go out," senior co-captain Michael Turner said. "We still don't like to see that '7' on the board, but there are some things we can't control. I'm not worried though." Turner has no reason to be worried after Saturday's domination of the Leopards. Lafayette barely entered Penn's half of the field all day. Besides one drive, which ended with a Michael Juliano-Pat Goodwillie blocked field goal attempt, the Leopards did not traverse more than two yards into Quaker territory until only backups remained on the field. The Leopards had to know there would be problems early. In their very first possession, they traveled a net total of two yards. And when the final gun sounded, Lafayette had only averaged 2.5 yards per play. "The defense played hard," coach Al Bagnoli said. "We made them earn most of their yards." Lafayette's job was made even tougher thanks to the big-play Penn defense. After early adjustments, the Quakers shut down Marsh, who only had 25 second-half yards. That allowed the defensive line to explode on whichever quarterback the Leopards sent in. "If and when we get pressure, it's a cumulative threat," said Turner, who recorded two sacks. "When the quarterback's throwing off his heels, it makes it easier for the backs." And that is exactly what happened as Lafayette quarterback Joe Clair was running for his life all afternoon. While being pressured by Mike Silvey, Clair tossed one up. Unfortunately for the Leopards, Penn defensive back Jamie Daniels grabbed the pigskin and returned it 28 yards for a touchdown. "I hope they throw at me," Daniels said. "I know the defensive line can put pressure on them and make them throw a bad pass." And bad passes seemed to be in fashion for the Lafayette quarterbacks, who completed only 12 of 35 attempts. During Mike Talerico's stint taking snaps, he managed to throw one interception, throw at least 10 passes away under pressure and get acquainted with Franklin Field's Astroturf on three separate occasions. So obviously, Lafayette's all-time winningest coach, Bill Russo, turned to Clair. If it was possible, things got worse. Clair, under constant pressure from the Quakers' front five, overthrew wide receivers, skipped passes off the turf and tried to avoid Penn defensive linemen. And as bad as things got, they could have been even worse for the Leopards. Daniels dropped two possible interceptions, one when senior safety Nick Morris delivered one of his patented hits. Clair, who was under constant pressure but was never sacked, barely avoided a safety in the third quarter. Penn running back Terrance Stokes fumbled on the Lafayette four-yard line. And Lafayette even converted five third downs and two fourth downs. "We played fair," Daniels said. "We did not play exceptionally well. We played in spurts." But for one hot afternoon in September, those spurts were enough to overwhelm Lafayette. The high-powered Leopard offense, which led them to a second-place finish in the Patriot League and a 5-4-2 record last season, left Franklin Field dejected, having seen enough of the best defensive unit in the Ivy League.


Repeating Perfection

(09/16/94 9:00am)

Penn faces aPenn faces adifferent typePenn faces adifferent typeof battle in itsPenn faces adifferent typeof battle in itsquest to repeat In Hanover, leaves are beginning to turn brilliant colors, thoughts of another austere New Hampshire winter are resurfacing, and next Saturday is circled on calendars. Ivy League champion Pennsylvania will be paying a visit to Memorial Field, home of the Dartmouth College football team. There is a world of difference from one year ago, when the Big Green was three-time defending champion, and Penn was simply green with inexperience. After a perfect 10-0 season, the Quakers are now on top. Penn is the team with everything to lose. That will be a common theme as the Quakers make another milk run through the Ivy circuit. Rarely does a team, even with the most talent, complete its season without tripping up somewhere in the Ancient Eight. There has never been an Ivy team since league play began in 1956 which has gone through its schedule two straight years winning every game. The Quakers must pay visits to hostile Princeton and Brown in addition to Dartmouth. And Columbia, Yale and Harvard, with its new coach from Division I-A Cincinnati, are not certain victories for Penn, despite the Franklin Field venue. When the Quakers were making their meteoric rise to the top of the Ivy standings, there was always that goal they had not achieved. Always a target for which to strive. Always a desire to prove to others that Penn is a winner. Now, all that has happened. It becomes a defense rather than an assault, a totally different frame of mind. "Now, everybody's gunning for you," running back Terrance Stokes says. "Everybody wants to knock you off that pedestal, so you have to be focused every week. You have to work hard every day. I'm hoping the other players understand what it's going to take for us to even be able to compete with last year's team." Stokes is a senior and remembers all too well the struggles as other teams drove Penn to defeat, and Gary Steele from the head coaching position. The Quakers finished 2-8 just three years ago. Complacency should not be a problem. Penn has enough seniors who remember the downfall from the '80s dynasty, which won six championships. "Even though it's an issue and we have to keep our eye on it, it doesn't concern me as if this were the fifth or sixth year of being really successful," Penn coach Al Bagnoli says. "At that point no one has a memory of a bad season. While I'm concerned, at this point it's not something?we have to take care of." Bagnoli is impressed with the shape in which his players returned after the summer. Credit the first year of Ivy League spring practices for the mental readiness. Twelve refresher sessions in the spring do wonders for retention of plays and theory. Credit strength coach Rob Wagner and the determination of the players in the offseason for the physical side of the preparedness. What could have been a lax offseason filled with complacency instead became a challenge to get better and assure future success. "We as a team have a challenge to keep the same desire, the same focus and not to relax," says Michael "Pup" Turner, a senior defensive end whose biggest assets may be heart and hustle. "We have to remember that the 1994 team hasn't played a game." Much of the squad remains intact, particularly on the offensive side, where seven starters return. Conspicuously absent, though, is Penn all-time passing leader Jim McGeehan, who may soon begin a professional career in Europe. In steps Mark DeRosa, a 6-foot-1, 164-pound sophomore from Carlstadt, N.J. DeRosa admits nervousness, but should feel comfortable throwing to high school teammate Mark Fabish, who will see action opposite All-America receiver Miles Macik. Senior Leo Congeni is likely to get the start at flanker, Brian Higgins at up back and all-everything Stokes at running back. The veteran offensive line, anchored by first team all-Ivy center Pete Giannakoulis, figures to provide ample protection for DeRosa. McGeehan will be watching DeRosa from the upper deck, and plans to call the QB before the game to offer his insight. "I'm going to tell him to relax, not to let the pressure get to him, and let his natural ability take over," McGeehan says. "He shouldn't think too much out there. Mark will be a phenomenal quarterback." The defense will attempt to keep other opponents off the scoreboard, particularly early in the season. DeRosa would then be able to become comfortable passing without comeback pressure. Gone are three staples on the defensive side -- Dave Betten, Jim Magallanes and Andy Berlin. Betten was the most consistent performer on the defensive line while serving as co-captain. Berlin was second on the team in tackles, and allowed the Quakers to play a versatile defense due to his ability to excel both at pass and run coverages. Magallanes was a veteran leader of the defensive backfield, always delivering the big hit. Senior Pat Goodwillie returns, and will be a major contributor in a defense designed to direct opposing running backs to the linebackers. He was the only non-senior on the first team all-Ivy squad in 1993. Kevin DeLuca gets the nod at the other middle linebacker, with Joey Allen waiting in the wings. "If you ever get the consummate linebacker, those are the kids you never have to take out of the game," Bagnoli says. "You don't have to take them out on third and 10 and substitute them for a coverage kid. You don't have to take them out on goal line and substitute them for a run kid. Those kids are hard to find." The Ivy League football coaches poll named Penn its unanimous choice to repeat as Ivy League champion. It was the first time in the poll's history a team has been unanimously selected. That's little consolation to Bagnoli and his players. "We're starting over," Turner says. "We haven't proven a thing."


BUILDING BLOCKS: Offensive Line

(09/14/94 9:00am)

Offensive linemen lead the way for high-profile players They're not your typical football players. They don't receive glory or accolades. You probably wouldn't even recognize one if you passed him on Locust Walk. They don't get their names in the paper very often, and you probably wouldn't even know their names if they did. They're offensive linemen --Ethe most vital asset to this year's Quaker offense. "The kids on the offensive line are different kids," offensive coordinator Chuck Priore said. "They don't get their names in the paper?.It's too bad?but who cares if the newspapers respect you." In fact, when a Philadelphia paper recently came to talk to the Penn captains, the reporters jumped to interview defensive end Mike Turner and running back Terrance Stokes. But the reporters all but ignored starting all-everything center Pete Giannakoulis. "Lineman is a forgotten position," Stokes said. "Everyone tends to overlook the linemen. I try, on each occasion I can, to congratulate them for a job well done." This season, with an inexperienced quarterback leading the Quakers, Stokes expects to have even more opportunities to thank his line for clearing his path to the promised land. But with new quarterback Mark DeRosa coming in, the pressure is on the offensive line to protect him. "Last year, we were very inexperienced," Priore said. "I think the kids did a good job, but I don't think by any means they were a dominant offensive line. We just did what we needed to do. I think this year we should take a little pressure off the other positions." And the men responsible for relieving the pressure begin right in the middle with Giannakoulis. The senior co-captain is a two-year starter who was named first team all-Ivy last season. In games which he has started, the Quakers have amassed an awesome 17-2 record. "He's our best football player up front," Priore said. "He's got to be one of the top lineman in the league. When you start in the middle and have a good center, I think it helps you on both sides." "It's his fourth year with the program," Stokes said of Giannakoulis. "Each year, he's gotten better. He's been a steady performer for us. It's only right that he be named a captain." Flanking Giannakoulis' sides will be junior Rick Knox, who started seven games last season, and senior Mike Teller. These two well-seasoned veterans will be backed up by three big sophomores -- Sears Wright (6-foot-6, 350 pounds), Matt Julien (6-4, 285) and Mark Fleischhauer (6-0, 232). On the ends, the Quakers return both starting tackles. Juniors Scott Freeman and Bill Glascott expect to continue exactly where they left off last season --Eclearing the way for Stokes' wide sweeps and protecting the quarterback's blind side. If either of these two goes down with an injury, senior Kevin Lozinak is a capable backup with some playing experience. The five starting linemen last season cleared the way for the Penn offense to overwhelm the Ivy League. The Quakers only averaged 408 yards of total offense per contest last season. The line only gave Jim McGeehan enough time to become the most efficient quarterback in the league. These five in the middle of every play made the offense run smoothly, and seemingly effortlessly. "Last year, I think they really performed well," Stokes said. "A lot of our success has to be attributed to them. There's no way I would have run for 1,200 yards and there's no way Jimmy would have the career year he had without those guys. They are definitely an important factor in this offense." And come Saturday, although the public address announcer may not call out their names after every play, they're the ones fighting in the trenches. They're the ones covered in mud. Watch Terrance Stokes, he'll congratulate the right people for his success. After yet another one of his successful running plays, he'll go over and thank an offensive lineman for a great block. And that's all they ask for -- respect.


A FRONT ROW VIEW: Sweet to repeat!

(03/03/94 10:00am)

Tigers can't go through Moore The box score does not tell the whole story. Yes, without Matt Maloney's 24 points (on 7-of-14 shooting), four assists, four steals and only one turnover on the evening, the 25th-ranked Quakers would probably not have clinched their second-straight Ivy League championship and the ensuing berth in the NCAA Tournament last night at the Palestra. Yes, without Princeton turning the ball over a mind-boggling 21 times -- each one creating a separate ulcer in Pete Carril's stomach -- the game may have turned out differently. But what is not noticed on a quick glance of the stats is the play of Penn center Eric Moore. Without Moore turning in probably his finest performance of the year, the Quakers may have vanished from the Top 25 quicker than you can say "Gillooly." And the story of Moore's contribution goes far beyond his statistical line of nine points and nine rebounds. A Senior Night start for Andy Baratta relegated Moore, who came into last night's game averaging only 6.5 points and 4.0 rebounds per Ivy contest, to the bench at the beginning of the game for the first time this season. It also meant Baratta had the task of guarding suddenly-rejuvenated Tiger center Rick Hielscher. Hielscher, who was embarrassed with a second-half benching after scoring a grand total of zero points the last time these two teams met, got out of the gate quickly, taking advantage of Baratta's decreased mobility due to his knee injury. He scored five of Princeton's first seven points as the Tigers stayed close. Enter Moore. Hielscher was able to score when he backed into the paint with relative ease, taking advantage of his quickness to move toward the basket. Against Baratta and later Tim Krug, Hielscher was also able to gain incredible position inside the paint, making a basket almost automatic when he received the ball in the post. But when the 6-foot-7, 230-pound Moore entered the game, the lanky Hielscher suddenly found himself being pushed to the outside, where his effectiveness is limited at best. He turned the ball over twice and had one shot blocked while only making one basket in Moore's 11 minutes of floor time in the first half. This trend continued in the second half. While Hielscher made two shots in the first six minutes after intermission, he was getting punished physically inside. Moore clearly had the strength advantage, and the finesse of Hielscher could not match Moore's power. Hielscher started to drift farther outside the paint, making it more difficult for him to shoot, and easier for one of his passes to be picked off. He was getting worn down. But Hielscher got a break when Moore left the game with 12:47 to go. With Tim Krug now guarding him, it was Hielscher's turn to shine. Krug's block of an attempted dunk by Hielscher last year at the Palestra was probably the most memorable play of last season. However, Hielscher was the one who made Krug look bad last night. He easily established inside position during each possession, as Krug was unable to get a body on him and did not receive weak-side help on defense. In five minutes, Hielscher scored eight easy points to bring the Tigers within one point with 8:43 to go. Enter Moore. Now Hielscher does not show much emotion on the court, but you know when Moore lumbered back into the game, the Tiger center was thinking about the pounding he was about to take. And with the game on the line, Hielscher -- the Tigers' only offensive weapon on the night -- did not score again thanks to some defense that was otherwise unnoticed in the box score. Game over. Ivy Champs. All in all, Hielscher scored 15 points in the 12 minutes Moore was not guarding him, and only six points in the 28 minutes when Moore was on him defensively. But Moore's contribution was not limited to the Tigers' end of the floor. While his 4-for-13 performance from the field may not exactly conjure up images of Michael Jordan, Moore was at his best offensively during what was probably the most crucial minute of the game. With seven minutes to go and the Quakers up 41-40, the tension was mounting as every one of the 8,711 fans in attendance had hoped for Penn to have a comfortable lead by that point. Maloney found Moore in the right corner. Moore drove the baseline for a layup and was blocked by Hielscher. Moore pulled down the rebound, but the ball was then knocked in the air. He grabbed it again amidst a sea of black jerseys, using brute strength to fend off any Tiger hoping to get a piece of the rock. After what seemed like hours, Chris Mooney was finally whistled for the foul. Penn ball. A minute later, Maloney found Moore open just left of the key behind the three-point arc. Catching Hielscher sleeping on defense, Moore launched a three. Swish. Penn 44, Princeton 40. It was at about that point that the 8,711 people at the Palestra decided to scream at the top of their lungs for the remainder of the game. It is also at about that point that the Tigers decided to pack it up and head home -- five minutes early. They had enough. Game over. Ivy Champs. Thanks to an unlikely hero. Dan Feldman is a College senior from Dallas, Texas, and former Sports Editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian.


DPOSTM to become easy-listening center

(01/21/94 10:00am)

The Daily Pennsylvanian's Only Staff That Matters, (Sports, that is) may rock and roll no more. Because DPOSTM's new regime of Adam Rubin and Josh Friedman resembles the Princeton offense in the fact that they are really BORING. Not to mention that easy listening music may be greeting DPOSTM writers when they next enter the Pink Palace. · He used to be called Interruptus but now he's Alabama Slamma. Seems as if during one of Adam's first DP stories as a precocious freshman he called a men's tennis player for an interview. Apparently, his timing was off as the Quaker star was in the middle of serving one up (if you know what we mean) to his girlfriend, the hardest and best-placed serve of his life -- an ace if you will. Rumor has it this may be the closest Adam has come to serving it up since he arrived at college. Just ask his friend Marc, who recounts a story of Adam's prowess or lack thereof on the court in high school. It just so happened that Adam arranged a Battle of the Sexes with a female classmate in the spirit of the world famous Bobby Riggs/Billie Jean King match. History indeed repeated itself as Adam lost the match, his pride, his remaining shred of manhood and a considerable amount of money in a 6-3 romp by his female opponent. "He said he was going to kill her and he didn't," says Marc, his best friend since third grade. "I knew he was going to lose." There must have been a little more than money and pride on the line as Adam wound up taking his opponent and conqueror to the Senior Prom. As per his character, we figure the whole night was a double fault. Speaking of faults, Marc points to Adam's driving as a major one. "He hasn't improved since the day he got his license. It's like you're taking your life in your hands. I'm sure he's fine when he's driving straight." Ari, who has witnessed Adam's transformation from Interruptus to Alabama Slamma, confirms the driving prowess of his fellow intern at the Birmingham News. Besides getting a speeding ticket while driving down to Alabama in September, Adam managed to lock his keys inside his car, (while it was still running) while covering a Friday night high school football game. "He was a little nervous for a while," relates Ari. Perhaps that nervousness led him to the most grievous sportswriting transgression -- misquoting. Apparently Adam had trouble deciphering the Southern drawl of Samford football coach Chan Gailey. Adam printed what he thought he heard -- which led to a retraction from the newspaper and a memo from the Managing Editor. The upsetting memo circulated throughout the office and remained on the Sports Desk as a constant reminder of Adam's faux pas. "That weighed on Adam a little bit," Ari said. Weighing on Adam's friends is his taste in music. "When I think of his type of music, Barry Manilow comes to mind," says Marc. "The best music [that he likes] is soundtracks and it basically goes down from there." God help him. · Taste in music is also a problem for his co-editor Josh. Josh, also known as Sleeper for his interest in a particular Penn vs. Yale football game two years ago, is apparently a diehard Neil Diamond fan. Not only that but he absolutely loves Star 104.5's "Between The Sheets" romantic pop show. According to some of his (former) friends, this may be as close as Josh gets to romance. As the story goes, Josh came back from Winter Break freshman year with stories of various escapades involving scantily clad women covered with foam and bubbles in the most romantic of all cruise boat settings -- the hot tub. Seems as if Don Juan of the Love Boat -- which, of course, he tabbed himself -- sowed his wild oats on a Carribean cruise. The problem is, not one of his friends believed him. "We never had any proof except his word," a slightly inebriated former friend Mark Rosenbaum recalls. "The only way I would accept the validity of the story was if he could prove his worth at Penn and so far he hasn't?There's not a chance this guy claimed an entire ship of women, let alone one." Josh seemed to think that he could claim a shipful of women due to his prowess in the gym. Roommate Tal explains Sleeper's habits when hitting the weights. "He makes a horrifying face when he lifts weights," Tal observed. "It's grunting followed by air conditioning. His head sinks back, he snarls, his mouth shifts to one corner of his face. "He exhales so hard, that if you stand next to him you can feel the breeze. People have been known to laugh and point." So you can see why Josh must have scored big time on his cruise. Speaking of scoring, Sleeper believes that he can do it a lot -- on the basketball court. His hoops skills are legendary -- to himself, that is. Seems as if one time at Gimbel Gym, Josh took offense to an opposing player questioning his greatness. This led to a little trash-talking from Air Sleeper. "That would shut him up," he thought. Next thing he knew, the guy, who was twice his age, twice his weight and twice his size had him in a choke hold -- apparently not too amused with Josh's musings. Sleeper was not heard from again on the fateful afternoon. · So there you have it. The tale of the new leaders of the sports writing machine that is DPOSTM. Best of luck to Sleeper and Interruptus on repeating the success of the Undefeated Editors.


GUEST COLUMN: "Abortion: A Third Movement?"

(04/22/92 9:00am)

"I don't look at the fetus as a life. [A woman] should have every right to have an abortion as quickly as she would have a cancer removed." · To me, this quote by a College junior in a DP issue earlier this month was the last straw. I can no longer passively go along with the pro-choice side in the polarized debate over abortion. Make no mistake -- I have always and will always support the right to a legal abortion. But I refuse to be represented by people who see abortion as equivalent to tooth extractions, or even "tumor"-removing surgery. Abortion is not a legitimate form of contraception. Conception has already taken place. So what if an eight-week old fetus is not viable outside the womb in 1992? Fifty years ago, an eight-month old fetus was not viable outside the womb. Today it is. And fifty years from now, doctors will probably be able to develop babies-to-be in incubators starting only hours after fertilization. The point? I know this statement is anathema to pro-choicers, but . . . abortion kills babies. It destroys human lives, not just a disposable mass of tissue. This is not a "Hands Off My Body" issue. How can I say that pro-lifers are essentially correct and still support legal abortion? Because I believe there are certain situations where sacrifices -- even as costly as taking a baby's life -- are warranted. And because I also believe that the prospective mother is in the best position to make that decision -- not elderly, check-bouncing Congressmen, not Bible-quoting religionists. What if a teenage girl must decide between completing her pregnancy, dropping out of school and becoming helplessly welfare-dependent on one hand; or getting a safe, legal abortion, staying in school, getting a job and eventually settling down with the right man, on the other hand? It's up to her to think the issue through for herself and not be spoon-fed advice from anyone unless she asks for it. If her final conclusion is that having a baby would ruin not only her life, but the baby's along with it, then she is justified in getting an abortion. That doesn't mean a back-alley, dirty coat-hanger butcher job. It means a professional, safe procedure legal in all 50 states. In this case . . . abortion saves lives. And I support it wholeheartedly -- as long as all considerations are taken into account by the mother. I can't stand the thought of women making such a difficult decision without considering the life of the fetus -- it is a life. Abortion should never be seen as an alternative option to true birth control methods such as condoms and the pill. Nevertheless, nearly half of all women in abortion clinics are return customers. Yet, accidents happen. Even worse, there are many women who have little educational or economic means to prevent unwanted pregnancies. That's why people who want to protect the baby's life should never be allowed to impose their values on others. The goal of those who are morally offended by abortion -- including many like myself who side with pro-choicers anyway -- should not be the reversal of Roe v. Wade. The goal should be a massive education effort focusing on safe sex and contraception, instead of an idealistic "no premarital sex," "every sperm is sacred" approach. If religionists can make the small sacrifice of supporting condom distribution to teenagers, and sexually active couples can make the small sacrifice of using condoms, then fewer people would be forced to make the huge sacrifice of abortion -- which is morally wrong, but all too often tragically necessary. Even though this third movement -- both pro-choice and anti-abortion -- could cause a damaging rift with many current members of the pro-choice movement, I believe a consensus would eventually be reached. Only then will all sides of the abortion debate -- as well as the voiceless babies -- be somewhat appeased.


College editors like Ga. ruling

(03/02/92 10:00am)

Editors at college newspapers across the country said last night they are pleased with a Georgia court ruling allowing college newspapers access to student organizations' judicial records. Editors at both private and public schools said their school administrations frequently cite the Family Educational Records Privacy Act of 1974 to deny them access to files concerning disciplinary action taken against organizations. "We were waiting for this decision," Rutgers University The Daily Targum Editor-in-Chief Rebecca Quick said last night. "We are looking into the case." The Red and the Black, the independent student newspaper of the University of Georgia, won a partial victory last month in its lawsuit aimed at gaining access to the school's Organization Court -- the body which investigates student groups, specifically fraternities and sororities. Fulton County Superior Court Judge Frank Hull ruled the FERPA, which the University says is the backbone of its general records policy, does not apply to disciplinary records, Red and Black Editor-in-Chief Lance Helms said last month. Hull ruled that FERPA, which is commonly referred to as the Buckley Amendment, only applies to academic performance records, Helms said. Under the ruling Red and Black reporters will have access to all judicial records concerning organizations in both past and future cases, but are not allowed to attend the meetings. Helms added the paper will appeal the decision to the state supreme court to gain access to meetings. "It is implicit in the term educational institution that a university will educate its students about what constitutes appropriate and acceptable behavior," the College junior said last night. "Only through opening judicial records will this crucial aspect of education be successfully fulfilled." Currently, the University's judicial records are confidential and can not be viewed by reporters or anyone else not directly involved in the case. Indiana Daily Student Managing Editor Bruce Gray said his paper does not have access to judicial proceedings concerning organizations. He noted that Indiana University claims the records are condsidered an interdepartmental investigation which is protected by state law. "But there is an arrangement [under which] they will tell us what's going on," Gray said last night. "And they have been pretty good." Gray added that his independent newspaper, however, may use this case to demand more information through the Freedom of Information Act. Daniel Restrepo, editor-in-chief of The Cavalier Daily, the University of Virginia's independent newspaper, said his paper has "had trouble in the past" gaining access to the records. But UVA students will vote today on a school-wide referendum to open all of the judicial records that are "nonpersonally identifiable," Restrepo said. Restrepo said the referendum may open up judicial files at UVA, but noted that Cavalier Daily will still look into the Georgia decision and see how it applies to their state school. (CUT LINE) Please see EDITORS, page 5 EDITORS, from page 1


Bill would open crime blotters to public

(10/08/91 9:00am)

A bill requiring campus police departments to release a complete daily crime blotter will be introduced to the state senate by the end of next week, the bill's sponsor said yesterday. The bill would strictly prohibit screening the names of students charged with committing a crime against another student -- a practice the bill's advocates say is commonplace at colleges and universities across the state. If passed, the bill would also require the University to change the way it handles inquiries about campus crime. Currently, students cannot see daily crime reports and names of students charged with crimes on campus. In addition, University Police do not release full descriptions of suspects in answering questions about crimes. Many schools, including the University, justify withholding crime reports, claiming either that disclosure violates federal laws or that, because they are not public institutions, the reports are not public records. State Sen. Richard Tilghman (R-Bryn Mawr) said yesterday the bill will be introduced in the next ten days, adding the bill would have been introduced sooner had the capital's computer systems not been shut down for a few weeks. He said the bill is not "terribly radical" and that its "time has come." "I can't imagine a great groundswell of opinion against it," the state senator said. But he would not predict whether the bill would become law. It is not known yet whether or not the University will lobby against the bill. Assistant Vice President for Commonwealth Relations James Shada, one of the University's lobbyists in Harrisburg, was not available for comment yesterday. The Massachusetts bill was written and spearheaded by Harvard Crimson editor Joshua Gerstein, and Spiegel said yesterday that after learning of Gerstein's success, he decided to push for a similar law in Pennsylvania. "Several student newspapers around the state, including ours, have had problems getting information on crime to students because campus police claim their records are not public," Spiegel said. "A situation in which the police control what information goes out to the students is very dangerous." He added that Security On Campus -- which was founded by Constance and Howard Clery in 1986 after their daughter Jeanne was brutally raped and murdered in her dormitory as an undergraduate at Lehigh University -- convinced Tilghman to sponsor the bill. Howard Clery, who serves as president of Security On Campus, said he is pleased Tilghman is introducing the bill, adding he is certain it will pass because of the success the Massachusetts bill had. "[In Massachusetts] lobbyists tried to fight it, but they were . . . hounded by the student press and the Boston press," said Clery, whose group lobbies for free access to crime reports nationwide. Once introduced, the bill would be sent to a committee -- either the Judicial Committee or the Education Committee, Tilghman said, by the president pro tempore of the state Senate. The committee would then study the legislation, suggest modifications and then vote on whether or not to send the vote to the entire state Senate floor. Tilghman added he does not yet have a sponsor for the bill in the state House of Representatives and said he did not know when the bill would be introduced to the House.


Grad students to put out monthly newspaper

(09/26/91 9:00am)

Graduate student leaders will have their voices heard in a new forum when The Graduate Perspective newspaper appears in each graduate student's mailbox sometime in the next week. Printed in tabloid form, the first issue of Perspective will include articles on such topics as Clarence Thomas's nomination to the Supreme Court, health insurance, and Escort Service, as well as calendar and notices sections and student government pages. The monthly publication will be funded for the school year with $9000 from the Graduate and Professional Student Assembly, but GAPSA leaders and the members of the editorial board insist that the newspaper will be editorially independent. "They should be able to do and say what they want," said GAPSA Chairperson Michael Goldstein at last week's GAPSA meeting. "It's going to be as open and uncensored as we can make it," said GAPSA's Vice Chairperson for Communication Bernadette Barker-Plummer, the paper's editorial board coordinator -- the newspaper's version of an editor-in-chief. In the past, GAPSA and other groups such as the Graduate Student Associations Council produced monthly newsletters containing issues important to their organizations. The GAPSA newsletter, though, has been incorporated into Perspective, while GSAC will continue to print a newsletter. The newspaper aims to provide a "forum to reach a broad number of graduate students and get them involved," said GSAC President Anne Cubilie, another member of the editorial board. "We don't think of it as . . . competition to the DP," Barker-Plummer said. "We think of it as complementary." "[It focuses] on issues that are interesting and critical to graduate students that aren't as important to undergraduates," she added. "It's obviously different from the DP," added Cubilie. "It is not a newspaper on that level." The acting editorial board is made up of those who worked on this issue of the paper, but the group said that there are openings for any students who are interested in donating their time.


U. prof, AHA pres. sets his agenda

(09/25/91 9:00am)

Medical School Professor Edward Cooper, the new president-elect of American Heart Association, is looking to lower the high incidence of heart disease and stroke in blacks. According to Cooper, blacks are three to five times more likely to suffer heart failure than whites. In addition, stroke deaths are almost twice as common in blacks. "We want to narrow these gaps," he said. "This will require much better access to care and education." Last year, the AHA spent $71 million supporting nationwide research. The organization also sponsors school-site programs like "Tobacco-free 2000," work-site programs like "Heart at Work," and programs for physicians like "Heart Rx." Cooper added that it is important that more minorities become doctors, noting that minority doctors are more likely to practice in minority areas. It wasn't until 1964 that Cooper became the first black attending physician at HUP. "We have only one quarter of the doctors we need in minority areas," he said. The AHA, along with the American Cancer Association, is one of the two largest voluntary health organizations in the nation. The AHA has 3.2 million volunteers who are members of 2200 divisions. Cooper will serve for a year as president-elect before assuming the position of president in June 1992. Cooper is no stranger to the the AHA, having been involved for over 25 years in such capacities as Chairman of the Stroke Council and as a member of the groups' National Board of Elections. Cooper is recognized as an expert in the field of stroke prevention, having been called on to testify before Congress as recently as this past spring. Cooper spoke to the Appropriations Committee about the need for more money to be allocated for cardiology research. Heart disease is the number one cause of death in the U.S. "Heart disease and stroke kill almost as many people as all other things combined, yet we don't get nearly that proportion of money for research," Cooper said. Cooper said that the reason for this lack of appropriate funding is due to "a lack of understanding." He cited a recent Minnesota study which found that only five percent of people surveyed could name the three major risk factors for heart attack: cigarettes, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure. Cooper said the main theme of his new administration will be prevention. "We have to prevent children from having high blood pressure in the first place," he said, pointing to causes ranging from improper diet to watching too much television. Cooper praised William Kelley, executive director of the Medical Center, for his emphasis on research in molecular biology. "Here at Penn we're in the right position to find out who is at the highest risk for stroke and heart disease," he said. Although Cooper is kept busy by meetings and interviews such as a recent two hour call-in show on WHAT, he said he also enjoys spending time with medical students. "The part I most enjoy is when a student spends the day with me watching me as I work," he said with a smile.


Campus editors discuss effects of Gulf war

(01/29/91 10:00am)

While the University echoed with shouts of protest the night the U.S. and allied forces began their bombing of Iraq, across town at Temple University, quiet reigned. And according to editors from five Delaware Valley college newspapers who met yesterday at Drexel University, reactions varied throughout the region. After weeks of protest during the nearly month-long faculty strike last fall, few students can muster enthusiasm to rally again, editors from The Temple News said yesterday. "Temple is a really tired campus right about now," Jen Watson, the paper's news editor said. Editors of The Review at the University of Delaware reported wide-raging reaction, rather similar to the atmosphere at the University. Review Editor Darin Powell said that an organization called Citizens Against War formed during the fall and two protests drew about 250 students. Editors from St. Joseph's University said that students have become more active at a campus they described as usually conservative. Prayer vigils and debates on the editorial page of their newspaper, The Hawk, have been the primary activities on campus. Drexel newspaper editors said virtually the only protests visible on their campus were borrowed, as they watched University students heading from campus to Center City on the night the war began. But Triangle editors, who sponsored the meeting, said there was a candlelight vigil and the administration will maintain a burning candle in the campus's main building. Editors from all of the newspapers said that agreeing on a editorial stance for or against the war was difficult, if not impossible. Most said that they have not taken a stand for or against the war. The editor of The Temple News, Erin Friar, said she and her staff hesitate to take a firm editorial stand because of the historic value of the period. "It's kind of intimidating. We're dealing with history," Friar said. "Years from now, people may look back at the issues and say 'they were wrong, or boy, they were right.' "


Forum looks at extracurriculars

(11/14/90 10:00am)

As part of the University's continuing 250th anniversary Future Forum series, a five-speaker panel addressed the extracurricular college experience to a five-person audience at the Annenberg School yesterday afternoon. During the 90-minute discussion, panelists discussed the growing need for more extracurricular activities saying that the University must continue to provide a structure for new programs. Panelist Gillian Johnson said that extracurricular activities "create energy." The College senior added that the University must encourage enthusiasm among its undergraduates through its extracurricular activities and maintain a variety of activities. Answering criticisms about how activities may divert a student's attention from academics, Johnson, who works on the Social Planning and Events Committee, said "No one can tell me that all those things got in the way of my academics." Another panelist, graduate student Eric Borguet, echoed the need for extracurricular activities, adding that there must be a greater emphasis made at the graduate level. "People's extracurricular needs do not disappear once they go to grad school," he said. "They are just put on the back burner. I hope these people will come out and show their concern about things other than their studies." Citing the low number of activities at the graduate level, he said he hopes that the University will lead graduate schools to develop "people as people rather than super-specialized technicians in some field." While the students on the panel told of a need for more extracurricular activities, Assistant Education Professor John Puckett urged that more academically-based public service programs be developed. He attributed it to "enlightened self-interest if not moral responsibility" on the part of the University. Puckett said students are "woefully lacking" in a sense of moral commitment and community. He said there are many advantages and reciprocal benefits of community-based public help including what he called "learning by serving." Dana Carver, the project coordinator of the 250th office, said she was disappointed with the turnout at the discussion. "The first two [forums] were better attended," Carver said. "What bothers me is that unless it's a party, the students don't come out. They are so willing to scream, but not to support."