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This story was last updated at 3:43 p.m. on March 22. Please check back for new updates.

Philadelphia mayor issues stay-at-home order to slow spread of coronavirus

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney announced on Sunday a stay-at-home order for the city of Philadelphia effective Monday at 8 a.m., NBC10 Philadelphia reported.

Philadelphia Managing Director Brian Abernathy said the order prohibits gatherings outside a household unless related to essential business, according to NBC10 Philadelphia. CBS Philly reported that walk-in takeout orders at businesses and food trucks are also prohibited.

Kenney said too many people were not taking previous guidelines set forth to enforce social distancing seriously, NBC10 Philadelphia reported.

On Sunday CBS Philly reported 11 new COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia, brining the city's total number of cases to 96. 

Provost clarifies University is not ordering students who live off-campus to leave

Provost Wendell Pritchett wrote in an email to Penn undergraduate students Wednesday morning that the University regrets any confusion about students being forced out of their private residences. Penn strongly encourage students who live off-campus to return home or to practice social distancing if students decide to stay, Pritchett wrote.

In a March 15 email sent to Penn parents, Pritchett previously announced that Penn was looking to move students living off campus away from their residences. 

"We instructed all residents of University housing to leave by Tuesday March 17 and expect off-campus students to vacate their residences by the same time," Pritchett wrote in the March 15 email. "We have communicated Penn’s position to local landlords and asked them to work with their tenants to support this public health necessity."

But both Campus Apartments and The Radian, two of the largest off-campus landlords, said they haven't heard from the University about moving their tenants out. The Radian also asserted that Penn has no right to tell their tenants to leave and expressed surprise at the University's announcement. 

Penn will open drive-through coronavirus testing

A drive-through coronavirus testing site for people sent by their doctor will open on Monday, according to CBS Philly.

Judith O'Donnell, a Penn Medicine professor specializing in infectious diseases at Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, told The Washington Post that the drive-through will help Penn Med decide which patients to test.

University suspends non-essential on-campus research activities

Provost Wendell Pritchett wrote in an email to all graduate school professors on Sunday evening that researchers must discontinue all non-essential on-campus research activities by March 17 to prevent the spread of coronavirus. Staff, students, and postdocs, however, will continue to receive funding.

According to the email, labs will only permit essential personnel to perform critical procedures or processes that require regular attention beginning March 18.

Research efforts to combat coronavirus will continue, Pritchett wrote.

Penn emails parents saying the University expects off-campus students to leave their homes

In an email to Penn parents on Sunday afternoon, Provost Wendell Pritchett announced that Penn was looking to move off-campus residents away from their residences. 

"We instructed all residents of University housing to leave by Tuesday March 17 and expect off-campus students to vacate their residences by the same time," Pritchett wrote. "We have communicated Penn’s position to local landlords and asked them to work with their tenants to support this public health necessity."

But Campus Apartments, one of the largest off-campus landlords, said they haven't heard from the University about moving their tenants out. David Adelman, chief executive officer of Campus Apartments, wrote in an email to The Daily Pennsylvanian that the company has "received no communication from the University."

"The Provost’s letter indicates that students must move out of their university college house or fraternity and sororities by Tuesday, March 17 at 8 p.m.," Adelman wrote. "This does not include non-university properties such as buildings owned or managed by Campus Apartments and other landlords in University City."

Penn alerts students that any on- or off-campus group gatherings will be shut down by Penn Police

The University emailed the Penn community on March 14 reminding students to practice social distancing as a part of the school's efforts to combat the coronavirus.

Signed by Provost Wendell Pritchett and Vice Provost for University Life Valerie Swain-Cade McCollum, the email mandated student groups cease all on- and off-campus group activities such as parties and other events. Students found to be congregating on or off campus will have their events shut down by the Penn Police. 

According to the email, students who violate the University's social distancing directive may face consequences such as referrals to the Office of Student Conduct.  

Residential Services can no longer process requests to remain on campus in 24 hour period

According to the Penn Residential Services website, students who have submitted an application to remain on campus should no longer expect a response within 24 hours due to the number and complexity of requests that have been received.

Residential Services previously sent an email on Thursday morning to on-campus residents that students who are unable to travel home for personal reasons or because they live in an area that is affected by travel restrictions may fill out an application to remain on campus. Students would receive a response within 24 hours, the email read.

The application must be completed by 12 p.m. on March 13, according to the March 12 email.

All clinical sites for Nursing students are canceled for two weeks until further notice

Clinical sites, which include Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, are currently restricting Nursing students from clinical experience for a minimum of two weeks.

Penn Medicine Nurse Practitioner and Penn Nursing lecturer Christine Reger sent an email to students in NURS 390, "Leadership in the Complex Healthcare System," a course offering clinical experience to seniors, on Friday afternoon. Reger notified students that administrators are working to find ways for students to make up the clinical hours that are state-mandated for graduation.

Pediatric Nursing assistant professor Sharon Y. Irving wrote in an email to students enrolled in NURS 225, "Pediatric Nursing", offered to juniors, on Friday morning that the clinical component of the class has been canceled for the semester. Didactic and simulation components will be delivered through remote learning, she wrote.

Provost Wendell Pritchett and President Amy Gutmann previously wrote in an email to the Penn community on March 11 that Medical, Dental, Veterinary, and some Nursing students would continue their clinical rotations.

Office of Student Affairs cancels all student-organized events

The OSA announced in an email on Friday afternoon to leaders of student groups that all student-organized events have been canceled for the remainder of the semester.

OSA Executive Director Katie Bonner and Associate Director Rodney Robinson wrote that all social events sanctioned by student groups will be prohibited. They wrote that the Office of Alcohol and Other Drugs will not be registering social events for the rest of the semester. Student groups who host social events will be referred to the Office of Student Conduct.

Bonner and Robinson urged student groups to cancel in-person meetings. They wrote that groups who need to meet should do so virtually.

College of Arts and Sciences announces changes to academic schedule

Dean of First-Year Students and Director of Academic Advising Janet Tighe sent an email on Friday afternoon to all College students announcing changes to the academic schedule.

The last day to change a grade type has been extended from March 20 to March 27. The advance registration period for fall 2020 has also been moved to Mar. 30 through Apr. 12. The advance registration period was initially from March 23 to April 5. The last day to withdraw from a course has been moved from March 30 to Apr. 13.

The College Office will move to remote appointments on March 16 and will not be open for in-person meetings, Tighe wrote.

Penn Dental Medicine suspends all student-delivered patient care

Penn Dental announced in an email sent to third and fourth-year dental students that Penn Dental will not be opened to any students beginning on Monday.

Provost Wendell Pritchett and President Amy Gutmann previously wrote in an email to the Penn community on March 11 that Medical, Dental, Veterinary, and some Nursing students would continue their clinical rotations.

Penn recommends employees work remotely

In an email to University faculty and staff on Friday, Penn urged remote work beginning March 16 until at least March 31.

Penn encouraged supervisors and senior leaders to begin planning to support off-campus work. Employees whose jobs do not allow them to work remotely should coordinate off-site duties with their supervisor, according to the email.

The email read that no paid employee will be relegated to unpaid status.

Penn Medicine bans most hospital visitors due to coronavirus

Penn Med issued a strict visitation policy Friday morning at all Penn Med hospitals and outpatient facilities to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

For inpatient visits, visitations will be granted under special circumstances, including to visit a patient nearing the end of life, a child in an intensive care nursery, a partner in labor, and a patient discharging from the hospital.

For outpatient appointments, one visitor will be allowed to accompany a patient for an ambulatory visit or if the patient undergoes a same-day surgery. A child under the age of 12 years will not be permitted to visit outpatient facilities.

If a visitor is allowed by exception, Penn Med will conduct health screening procedures.

Penn extends mandatory move-out by two days

President Amy Gutmann and Provost Wendell Pritchett announced in an email to the Penn community on Thursday evening that students who are already on campus will now be expected to move out of their on-campus residences by March 17 at 8 p.m.

Gutmann and Pritchett originally announced in an email on Wednesday that students living on campus must move out by March 15 at 8 p.m.

Penn identifies students and faculty who may have been exposed to coronavirus

Student Health Service emailed over 100 Penn students, faculty, and staff Thursday afternoon alerting them that they may have been exposed to an individual with coronavirus.

In an interview with The Daily Pennsylvanian, Penn's Director of Campus Health Ashlee Halbritter said out of the over 100 cases of potential exposure Penn identified, none of the cases were high risk.

Out of the over 100 cases, Halbritter said more than three-quarters were low-risk cases and the rest were medium-risk cases. A high-risk case is when someone who was exposed to another person with coronavirus reveals symptoms of coronavirus, Halbritter said.

Medium-risk cases include instances where someone could have shared a meal with an individual with coronavirus or where someone studied with an individual with coronavirus in close quarters, Halbritter said. Low-risk cases could include individuals spending time in the same room with someone who has coronavirus for around 10 minutes, but never within six feet of the individual.

Penn Summer Abroad canceled for summer 2020

All Penn Summer Abroad programs for summer 2020 have been canceled due to travel restrictions and health concerns associated with the coronavirus pandemic. 

Penn Summer Abroad sent an email to students planning to study abroad this summer on Thursday afternoon informing them of the cancelation. The email read that students who submitted a $500 deposit will be refunded in full.

All Penn students currently studying abroad in Europe, the United Kingdom, and Ireland are being encouraged to return home as soon as possible. 

In a Thursday evening email to Penn students abroad, Provost Wendell Pritchett announced the recommendation and wrote that it was linked to the United States' government travel restrictions on non-U.S. citizens traveling from Europe. Pritchett wrote that Penn would provide financial assistance with flight costs.

Students on campus must move out this week and students off-campus not permitted to return

On-campus residents who left Penn for spring break are being urged not to return to school to retrieve their belongings, and students who remained on campus must move out of their dorms by March 15 at 8 p.m.

Penn Residential Services sent an email to on-campus residents on Thursday morning outlining new housing policies to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Residential Services, the Division of Public Safety, and the College Houses will secure the belongings of students living in the College Houses, Sansom Place, and University-recognized Greek houses who left campus for spring break. The University will contact students when they deem it is safe for students to retrieve their belongings, according to the email.

Residential Services wrote that there are no options to retrieve important items including laptops, course materials, and personal effects. If a student believes they have an emergency situation, they can email living@upenn.edu to attempt to retrieve their item.

For students who are still on campus, Residential Services staff will assist with move out by providing carts, assisting with check out, and answering questions.

Students who are unable to travel home for personal reasons or because they live in an area that is affected by travel restrictions may fill out an application to remain on campus. The application must be completed by 12 p.m. on March 13. Students will receive a response within 24 hours, the email read.

Residential Services wrote that the University will issue a partial refund or credit for future housing or dining plans for students living on campus and students on a meal plan. An application process will be announced later in the semester, Residential Services wrote.

Students expressed frustrations with the University's lack of clarity and short notice for moving out after Penn announced on Wednesday afternoon that all classes would move online for the spring semester to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Wharton senior Rosie Nguyen described the four-day notice as "ridiculous," particularly for first-generation, low-income students, international students, and students who live far from Penn.

Wharton first-year Jianan Zhang said she plans to fly back to Philadelphia tomorrow to bring her belongings home to Miami but is unsure how she will find storage on such short notice for the items she cannot bring on the plane.

Penn will continue paying work-study students

Work-study students can submit their regularly scheduled hours for payment each week for the rest of the spring semester, according to an email from Student Registration and Financial Services to The Daily Pennsylvanian. 

SRFS wrote that work-study students are not required to work remotely in order to receive payment. 

Global travel bans and the uncertain fate of Penn's classes and dormitory availabilities have left first-generation, low-income students unsure of where they will live and how they will pay for housing and meals. 

College first-year Jesse Soto, who identifies as an FGLI student, said the University must consider how remote instruction affects low-income students who may rely on Penn for meals, housing, and internet access.

“For me, one of my biggest fears is food insecurity. I know that without the dining plan, I would not be getting two to three meals a day,” Soto said. 

He said although he qualified to receive a laptop from the University and has internet access at home, he knows other students who do not have equal tools at home. 

"[Online learning] bars so many students from continuing their education and, quite frankly, that’s not what we came to these institutions for," Soto said.

International students from countries not designated Level 3 by CDC are required to return home

Director of International Student and Scholar Services Rodolfo Altamirano sent an email to all international students Wednesday afternoon instructing all students from a country not designated Level 3 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to return home. Students from China, Iran, Italy, or South Korea may return home but are not expected to do so.

Altamirano wrote that students' visas will not be terminated early if they leave the United States now. For students remaining at Penn or in the United States, U.S. government guidance will allow students to continue their study online, the email read.

International students who anticipate difficulties in completing courses online from their home country due to insufficient connectivity or other technological challenges should contact their ISSS assigned advisor, Altamirano wrote.

All classes will move online beginning March 23

Penn will extend spring break for one week and move all classes online beginning March 23 to the end of the spring semester, in an effort to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

Provost Wendell Pritchett and President Amy Gutmann sent an email to the Penn community on Wednesday, instructing students who are off campus for spring break not to return. The email instructed students on campus to move out by March 15, adding that University staff will be available to help departing students. 

Coronavirus patient in critical condition at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 

A patient who has tested positive for coronavirus is being treated at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. The individual is in critical condition and is a Montgomery County, Pa. resident, health officials announced on Monday.

Later Monday afternoon, CBS Philadelphia reported that the patient at HUP is a Children's Hospital of Philadelphia cardiologist. The doctor works at the King of Prussia Specialty Care and Surgery Center, CBS Philadelphia reported.

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