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Credit: Joy Lee

Jan. 20 2018 marks exactly a year since President Donald Trump was inaugurated, beginning one of the most turbulent, controversial administrations in U.S. history. It also marks a full year since Penn has had a graduate in the country's top office; a full year since "the Wharton School of Finance" and the Penn brand in general has inevitably been pulled into a national discussion surrounding Trump and his credibility as a leader. 

As a means of taking stock of this momentous year, publications across The Daily Pennsylvanian Inc. put together a range of stories that explore the impact of the Trump presidency on his alma mater. 



From the Women's March to fallout from various iterations of the travel ban, the 45th President has incited a series of dramatic protests on campus and in the city. Here's a look back at 13 of the most dramatic moments from his first year. 

Credit: Julio Sosa

Even while he was campaigning, student activists at Penn were responding to Trump in more ways than one. College senior Isabel Kim, who was part of the team behind the anti–Trump “Pussy Grabs Back” apparel series that debuted during the final two months of Trump’s campaign, talks to 34th Street Magazine about her next project around Trump's administration

Inside the classroom, students and faculty have also searched for ways to analyse and grapple with the implications of Trump's presidency. Changes include: an increased interest in political science courses, a renewed "urgency" in classes on media and a range of new challenges around the issue of free speech. Politics reporter Lucy Curtis reports here

One quick fact: According to data from the site Factbase, Trump has never publicly mentioned Fordham, the university he attended for two years before transferring to Penn, since 1980.

This collection only includes some of many stories that The Daily Pennsylvanian has written about Trump and his connections to Penn. Here is a guide to all of our stories from 2017, which include an investigation into his academic performance at Penn as well as his ambiguous financial contributions to the University. 

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