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COLUMN: Penn knew what was coming, but it didn't help

(02/21/96 10:00am)

Temple's legendary matchup zone was certainly nothing new to the Quakers, but as usual they couldn't solve it John Chaney is not one for surprises. The legendary Temple coach would probably even give you his playbook if you asked nicely. Chaney doesn't win with trick plays or anything that can remotely be described as flashy. His strategy is as predictable as the loosened tie and the angry scowl. Chaney dares opponents to beat his Owls at the basics. Try to beat the Temple match-up zone. Try to speed up the pace of the game. Try, just try, to score 70 points. Last night was no different than the past 14 Penn-Temple matchups. Quakers coach Fran Dunphy knew exactly what Chaney was going to chalk up, as did 7,364 fans who filled the Palestra bleachers. But it didn't matter. The Owls held the Quakers to just 18 first-half points and only 42 for the game. And Chaney didn't even have to turn to page two of his playbook. The Temple defense was at its best in the first half yesterday -- and that's pretty good considering the Owls have already knocked off then-No. 1 Kansas and then-No. 2 Villanova earlier in the season. Temple guards Levan Alston, Huey Futch and Lynard Steward somehow managed to rotate around to double-up the Quakers perimeter players before the pass even got to the open man. Going down low to Tim Krug or Paul Romanczuk was equally impossible. The Owls zone shut off every passing lane to the low post, forcing Penn to fire up 20 first-half treys. All of the Quakers' usual scoring avenues were shut off. Even swingman Ira Bowman was held in check. Temple never allowed Bowman to penetrate to the hoop. Penn's leading scorer was held to just four points -- all within the last minute and a half of the game when the outcome was already decided. Penn managed just 10 shots inside the three-point arc during the first 20 minutes of action. A Donald Moxley finger roll and two Krug layups were the only two-pointers scored by the Quakers in the half. No surprises. Just basic Chaney. But there was one change to script. Temple has dominated Penn in the past with strong guard play. From Mark Macon to Eddie Jones and Aaron McKie to Rick Brunson last year, the Owls always seemed to have an outside player who could take over a game if need be. But the star of yesterday's game was 6-foot-10 center Marc Jackson, who bullied Krug and Romanczuk in the paint for much of the first half. Jackson scored 10 points before intermission -- all within five feet of the basket. With his Quakers down by 14 points, Dunphy made some long overdue adjustments at the break. In the second half, Jackson had two, sometimes three, Penn bodies draped over his 275-pound body every time the ball was lobbed down low. Penn held Jackson to just two field goals in the second half. With Jackson tangled up and outside shots not falling, the Owls merely treaded water for the rest of the game, holding off a late Penn run to win, 53-42. Shooting 36.2 percent from the floor would kill most teams, but Temple only needed 43 points for the victory. "I've been here four years," Owls forward Derrick Battie said. "And all four years, I've heard Coach say, 'You guys just can't shoot.' Even when Aaron and Eddie were here, I used to hear him say, 'You guys just can't shoot.' I've been hearing that for four years." And after we're all long graduated, John Chaney will still be stomping on the sidelines, complaining about his team's performance. The tie will be down to his navel, the sweat drenched through his white shirt. John Chaney will probably never change -- and neither will his playbook.


Dedication not Frustration

(01/24/96 10:00am)

In three-and-a-half seasons, Alison Zegar has seen many of her friends leave the swim team and has not won an Ivy League meet since her freshman year, but still she swims Alison Zegar first jumped into the water at a neighbor's house when she was four years old. Following the example of her two older sisters who also swam, she stroked her way through middle school and high school swimming on the local YMCA team -- a team which won the YMCA nationals her sophomore year. "One of my greatest moments in swimming was at Y nationals when the 800 free relay placed first," Zegar said. "It was my first year being in this meet, and I was the youngest person on the relay. It was between me and another girl to race and the coach put me in it. And then we ended up winning the relay." "My freshman year, we won our first meet against Cornell," Zegar said. "It was very exciting, and it kind of stands out." Since then, it has only been close calls. One of those near misses came earlier this season at Sheerr Pool when the Quakers barely lost to Columbia, 151-149, December 9. "One of the hardest moments I've had is the Columbia meet," Zegar said. "It came down to me in the last relay. It is really hard to accept my leg was the difference between winning and losing, and I didn't come through." "She's a real example of toughness, grit, never say die, go after it and see what happens," Penn coach Kathy Lawlor-Gilbert said. "Against Dartmouth, a girl moved up on her and turned at the 400 wall at the exact same time she did. It would have been easy for a senior, who has done so much for the squad over the years, to say 'Oh well, let her go, I'm trying, but I'll get second.' She just doesn't do that." One particularly difficult part of Zegar's career at Penn has been the program's struggle as many of her teammates have left the team since Zegar first joined the Quakers in 1992. "It's really hard because you look around and you remember the people who were on your team then and how good they were and how much fun they were, and then they're not there," Zegar said. "It really takes a lot away from a sport. But I just wasn't ready to quit. I definitely wasn't ready to quit after freshman year. "Then going back and swimming in the summers, when you have the time to take a break from everything else and just get back into swimming, it's a great feeling. I would get up at 6 in the morning, when I didn't have to, to swim. So I knew I loved it, and I just wasn't ready to stop yet. Some people were ready. Or they felt they would be happier not swimming than swimming. I would be happier swimming." Natural ability has been something Zegar has shown since her collegiate career began. She was named Outstanding Freshman in 1992 and garnered Most Valuable Swimmer honors as both a sophomore and a junior. But as a two-time team captain, Zegar has contributed more to the team than just fast times. "Whenever there was a meet on the line or we needed extra points, she would not only do it herself, but she would try to encourage the rest of the group to get going," Lawlor-Gilbert said. "I think Alison is a natural leader. She is in tune with her teammates, so she can lead by action, as well as by words." Zegar primarily races the 500- and 1,000-yard freestyles, but she loves the relays the most. "I like swimming because when you get up to race, it's kind of like a rush that I don't get from anything else," Zegar said. "So when you're in a relay and people need you, you know it's not only you. It's more of a team setting, and you're there to help your team out. So it just gives you more of a rush. Your adrenaline starts flowing, and that's what it all comes down to -- the excitement of competing." "She is a killer," Lawlor-Gilbert said. "She is as tough as anything. She really aspires to be the best she can be. We train her the best we can and then let her loose."


COLUMN: That's Not Funny

(12/11/95 10:00am)

From Nathan Smith's "South End of the Northbound," Fall '95 From Nathan Smith's "South End of the Northbound," Fall '95The other night, the greatest thing happened to me: I was mugged. Those words scream out for an explanation, and that's what this, my final column of the semester, will provide. I had been having a rough time. My girlfriend of two years, whom I still dearly love, had dumped me for another man a few days before. As a result I had been unable to concentrate on my work, and had begun to lag sorely behind. This had planted the seeds of growing depression, and compounded with numerous other personal anxieties, had rendered my existence a hellish one. As Al Greene's smooth voice crooned about the joys of love and happiness, two commodities which I had begun to feel would never again resurface in my life, tears welled up in my eyes. The torrent of sadness rushing over me shook my body so hard, I actually wailed in pain. I must have looked pretty foolish, sitting at the wheel, trying to lock the Club, weeping and moaning as the music flowed gently from my stereo. Yes, I must have looked foolish, which essentially made me look like an easy target. And I was. When the tears began to subside, I turned off the stereo and opened my door. No sooner had I shut and locked it, when I felt a hand roughly grab the collar of my coat. Something cold, dull and metallic pressed firmly against the underside of my chin. It may have been a gun, but it doesn't matter. Being shot in the head or bludgeoned with a lead pipe are equally gruesome alternatives in my mind. "Gimme your wallet," a voice grumbled in my ear. I wasn't afraid. I didn't even really understand that my life was in danger, or that I was being robbed. I just knew I had to do what the voice commanded. I produced my billfold and the hand holding the metallic object moved to take it from me. Suddenly my field of vision liquefied, into a blur of lights and buildings. In a whirl I was jerked to the ground by my collar as my assailant took off running. My head smacked the pavement, though as a matter of good fortune my hair was pulled back -- the thick pony tail cushioned the blow. I lay dazed on the ground for a moment. At last I sat up and looked around. About 30 feet away lay my emptied wallet. For the moment my intense relief was concentrated on the fact that I would not have to cancel my credit cards or renew my driver's license; such trivial matters to consider when I might well have just had a gun to my head. I picked it up and walked to my house. For a brief period, no thoughts formed in my head. When I made it inside my apartment, the meaning of it all struck me like a ton of bricks. I had been mugged, possibly at gunpoint. For the sake of 15 dollars someone had been willing to take complete control over another human being, deprive them of their right to act of their own will, and perhaps if necessary to deprive them of their life. But I was alive. I survived. Suddenly, and most likely to the chagrin of my neighbors, I found myself laughing and whooping at the top of my lungs, crying tears of joy. I was alive! When I think of it now, I wonder if I should have called the cops. Surely the criminal was a dangerous one, and should not have been allowed to continue attacking innocent people. But to what avail? I had no description to provide. Furthermore, I felt more like shaking his hand than turning him in. For a measly 15 dollars, I had purchased my life. Not just in the sense of preventing him from taking it away; I had been empowered to take my life back for myself. What possible sense could there be in my bellyaching over lost love and mountains of classwork? Just moments before the episode began I had been weeping, wailing, wondering if I could carry on. Though unpleasant things have happened to me of late, these are facts of life to be faced. They are the price every human being must pay in order to taste the sweet joy of living. I continue to think and feel, and if that requires the agony of a broken heart, a stress-ridden mind and all the other discomforts of existence, then so be it. It seems that that was the best spent 15 dollars of my life. I have gained an appreciation, not just for the good things in life like love and happiness, but even for the bad. I appreciate heartbreak, school work, fatigue, injustice and robbery. For the alternative, an eternal sleep in a cool velvet darkness, has little appeal. I hope that when the power of this experience fades, as it surely will, I will not have to relearn it in the same manner. As for myself, passersby may expect an inexplicable grin on my face for quite some time, even when I trudge through the bitterest of cold to the most boring of classes.


GUEST COLUMN "Tyranny Disguised As Residential Living Precautions

(10/31/95 10:00am)

Beginning this week and continuing into the winter, agents of Residential Living intend to inspect rooms across our campus. In doing so, Residential Living Director Gigi Simeone and her staff hope to ferret out any health and safety violations. We contend that their motives are ulterior and their actions -- if carried out --violate our rights as students. According to Residential Living documents and a letter mailed to the freshman class, effective immediately, unannounced and uninvited inspectors shall be dispatched across the residences to enforce a despotic and tyrannical code of regulations (read: the occupancy agreement). These coming inspections have at their aim the annihilation of what Residential Living refers to as illegal and illicit decorations, electrical appliances, alcohol and tobacco. Moreover, they will also be enforcing absolutist -- nay, puritanical -- standards relating to cleanliness. (God damn it, our mothers couldn't make us clean our rooms and by golly, neither can Gigi!) We are of the opinion that random raids and room inspections are horrid abuses of executive authority and pose an immediate danger to the rights of students. In this age, a healthy mistrust of government is not only appropriate, but necessary and we do not doubt that this attitude should apply also to Gigi's henchmen (read: the RAs in the Quad). We yield to the immortal words of our forefathers who sad it best when they said forthright in the Federalist Papers: "A case which may perhaps be thought to resemble the latter, but which is in fact widely different, affects the question immediately under consideration (Publius, Federalist No. 32)." Indeed, no man should ever be subject to the wide latitude and complete discretion of any other man, not to mention Residential Living's band of brownshirts who consider themselves above the law. Ponder the matter for a moment: What is to stop a Fuhrmanesque rogue RA or assistant dean from planting evidence or framing non-politically correct, non-conforming free minds like us? What legal refuge will we have? What justice will be available to us after our rights are abridged? Said Johnnie Cochran of a similar outrage: "This is a bombshell." Indeed, as the tyrants and autocrats take strides to enforce our occupancy agreement and restrict our liberty, we the students must make a decision. Shall we allow them to dictate their terms to us by gun point while robbing us blind of a small fortune or shall we bear arms, ammo and children to fight the coming totalitarian regime? To illustrate the coming suspension -- nay, abrogation -- of our liberties we have prepared the following list of items and outrages we unearthed so as to raise the general consciousness on this grave matter: Consider: Clause 11 of the Rooming Contract. Students may not alter the ventilation system. Our response: Tyranny! We do not even have a ventilation system. Consider: Clause 13 of the Rooming Contract. Students may not possess illegal pets and pets must be humanely kept in a small cage or aquarium. Our response: Tyranny! What are we to eat when Stouffer serves cheesesteaks? Do they wish us to starve? Consider: Clause 19 of the Rooming Contract. Prohibits firearms, pistols and air rifles. Response: Tyranny! Do they want us to be the only unarmed people in the neighborhood? Consider: Clause 20 of the Rooming Contract. In Pennsylvania the possession and or use of alcohol by persons under the age of 21 is prohibited. Response: This is just Tyranny! Therefore, as we succinctly and indisputably demonstrated above, rooms searches are a clear violation of our liberties. Moreover, Penn's occupancy agreement is like the Treaty of Versailles: We may be forced to accept it now, but sooner or later, the students are going to rise up. So this winter, in the words of the great patriot G. Gordon Liddy, When they show up at your door without a warrant, be sure to aim for the head or the groin.


GUEST COLUMN: A Different World

(10/10/95 9:00am)

Not Guilty. Immediately after the verdict of the "trial of the century" was read by Deirdre Robertson, the law clerk to Judge Lance Ito, CBS news conducted a poll, later published in The New York Times, concluding that "six in ten whites believed the wrong verdict was reached, while nine in ten blacks said the jury had come to the right verdict." On Wednesday Oct. 4, 1995 the front pages of newspapers all across the country were adorned with elated African American faces alongside shocked and dejected white faces, all reacting to the controversial ruling. Immediately and entirely, the country became racially divided. As illustrated by the CBS poll, Americans' reactions were, much more often than not, contingent on their race as opposed to any of their other characteristics such as class or education. I spent many hours tossing and turning in bed that night trying to figure out how a nation that had watched the same proceedings, the same evidence, the same arguments, and the same testimony could feel so differently about the outcome? There seemed to be a fundamental difference in the way that African Americans and whites interpreted the evidence. It was as if African Americans were given one pair of glasses and whites another, each of them presenting juxtaposed and completely irreconcilable versions of the same story. The problem is one of perspective. For many years, American political scientists have been warning us that African Americans and whites view the world increasingly differently. In some cases, these differences in perspective involve even the most fundamental systems of our government. One example is the serious mistrust of both law enforcement and judicial systems by some of the black community. Growing up in a suburban neighborhood, I was taught to trust and respect the police, whereas it is easily conceivable that an African American child growing up in the inner city would mistrust, if not fear them. As a result of these experiences, I reacted much differently to the Furhman tapes than did most African Americans. While I was disgusted by his actions, I was convinced that Furhman was one of a minute and despicable minority of policemen who acted as such, while a large majority of African Americans saw it as business as usual within the precinct. For this same reason, while I found the defense's proposed scenarios of police-planted evidence preposterous, for all too many African Americans, it is a reality. The most disturbing consequence of this problem is that it directly challenges our concept of an American nation. Many prominent political scientists have described nationality as an identity generated by a group of people all sharing common experiences. The discrepancy between African American and white perspectives threatens to destroy the common experiences necessary for the cohesion of a nationality. If these two groups cannot reconcile their differences in agreement of such fundamental American institutions as justice and law enforcement, then we are in for an uncertain and dangerous future. Although it is easy, and often tempting, for me to dismiss the African American attitude as paranoid and fanatical, the fact of the matter is that I've never viewed the world from their perspective. I have no idea what the world looks like from behind their glasses. However, regardless of how justified or unjustified either perspective is, it is enormously important that we work as a country, and on a smaller scale, as a community to draw these perspectives closer together. Maybe then future cases like the O.J. Simpson trial can be judged without such dramatic differences in perspective. If nothing else, this case must give us all new incentive to inspire conversation to "break down the walls" between "us and them." Unfortunately, history has proven time and time again that old habits die hard.


City businesses may suffer from Phila. Naval Shipyard's closure

(09/15/95 9:00am)

The city had been home to the shipyard for 194 years; But an effort to cut jobs in the military forced the base to close The Associated Press Mary Sautter cooked on a wood-burning stove when she opened her luncheonette just outside the gates of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in 1924. With no electricity on the premises, she heated the place with coal. During World War II, some of the 48,000 workers who built ships around-the-clock filled her wood-frame restaurant and jammed into the phone booths that lined one wall. Today, the 194-year-old shipyard officially closes, bringing the last wave of cutbacks that have wiped out thousands of base jobs in recent years. Robert Sautter, who inherited his grandmother's old business in 1975, now faces a tough decision on the fate of Sautter's Luncheonette. ''I'll see what next week brings,'' he said Wednesday, as some of his remaining customers enjoyed eggs and coffee. Sautter spent his boyhood summers at the luncheonette, helping deliver blocks of ice to the base and going home at night to his uncle Francis' house in South Philadelphia. Seeing the shipyard wind down as the government shrank the military, Sautter, 42, returned to the crane rental business three years ago, leaving daily operation of the restaurant to his wife, Denise. Hundreds of other businesses -- primarily defense contractors -- that relied on the base are having to make their own adjustments to survive. Phillyship, an engine repair company, had to lay off all 25 employees in its government contracts office, said Myrtle Bender, the company's vice president. ''I know that some of them are unemployed to this day,'' Bender said. ''Going back maybe five years or so, it was 50 percent of our business,'' Phillyship now focuses on commercial ship repair and engine work at large hospitals and colleges. ''When we had a contract to work on, we would hire 50, 60 people,'' Bender said. Now the company has 45 employees in Philadelphia, New York and Baltimore. ''They were all being affected in different ways, depending on what they sold and what their markets were,'' Mulhern said. ''They've had several years to adjust and they're always adjusting to changes in their market.'' None of the companies indicated they would have to shut down because of the shipyard closure, but Mulhern said he would not be surprised if some businesses did just that. Comptek, a Mount Laurel, N.J., company that performed shipyard work for 10 years, is applying the skills it learned there -- bar-coding to keep track of parts -- to private industry and other military work. ''What we have done is participated in defense conversion,'' said Cheryl Newton, manager of Comptek's information technologies group. ''We aren't 100 percent successful but we are well on our way.'' Five years ago, some 13,000 civilians and 6,000 military personnel worked at the Navy complex, which fed $1.2 billion in wages and other income into the region. The complex supported 16,000 outside jobs in the Philadelphia region at the time, according to the nonprofit Pennsylvania Economy League. Since then, most of the civilian shipyard workers have received pink slips. On Wednesday, the shipyard's last project -- the refurbished aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy -- sailed back to Florida with 2,950 sailors. And in the last big wave of layoffs, 1,900 shipyard workers are receiving pink slips today. Several hundred others will remain behind to close up shop. Elsewhere in the Navy complex, an 1,800-person engineering operation will stay in business, as will a warfare center and a propeller foundry. ''[Today]'s the last step as far as direct job loss,'' said Terry Gillen, director of the city's Office of Defense Conversion. Most of the indirect job loss to outside businesses has occurred already, but Gillen said it's difficult to estimate the totals so far. In 1991, the Navy predicted 8,495 indirect job losses at base suppliers, restaurants and stores. The ultimate impact will depend on such factors as a German shipbuilder's proposal to make cruise ships at the shipyard. In the meantime, government and private organizations are trying to help those affected. Philadelphia has received $70 million in federal funds to retrain shipyard workers, help companies convert to civilian work and attract private industry to the shipyard. Greg Bischak, executive director of the nonprofit National commission for Economic Conversion and Disarmament in Washington, D.C., said the city has received more federal base-closure aid than any other city, ''and has less to show for it.'' He accused Mayor Edward Rendell of mismanaging the transition, leaving base suppliers ill-prepared for the closure. He blamed state and federal elected officials for wasting time with an unsuccessful legal battle to keep the base open, and the Navy for not relinquishing the base earlier for reuse planning. ''I view the last two years as a very clumsy and slow planning process,'' Bischak said. ''I think it's a scandal, frankly.'' Gillen said Rendell did try to plan for closure early on, but was criticized by other officials and labor unions who saw that as abandonment of a shipyard that had lived through false alarms in the past. Defense contractors, too, had hoped for a saved shipyard. ''We all tried so hard,'' said Newton of Comptek. ''We were all in the same boat together, first trying to save the shipyard from the closure process. We went up to the bitter end on that.'' As the shipyard faded over the last five years, Sautter's Luncheonette lost about 60 percent of its business. Sautter would like to keep it open, if possible, for sentimental reasons.


Students, faculty question tenure process at U.

(06/30/95 9:00am)

Jericho High School '93 Jericho, N.Y. A School of Arts and Sciences Personnel Committee voted in March to deny tenure to popular English Professor Gregg Camfield, shocking many members of the University community. "I did absolutely everything I was supposed to do and to have this happen is quite surprising," Camfield said after hearing of the decision. And many students and English professors -- including Department Chairperson John Richetti -- said they were upset by what they saw as a great injustice. According to Richetti, the requirements for tenure are research, scholarship and service, all of which Camfield said he had fulfilled. Last May, he received the English Undergraduate Advisory Board's (UAB) first annual teaching award. He has also published one book and has a second under contract. And Camfield served on the College's writing committee which helped institute the writing requirement. Undergraduate English Chairperson Al Filreis described Camfield as "just the sort of faculty member we need to retain." He explained that Camfield is especially popular among his students, as he regularly receives perfect 4.0 evaluations in the Penn Course Review. Many members of the English UAB who have had Camfield as a professor said they were extremely disappointed at hearing the news of his rejection. "Outraged doesn't even begin to cover it," said College senior Liz Fekete. "Gregg Camfield is one of the best teachers at this University and I think that fact is uncontestable." She added that she feels the administration acted in a hypocritical fashion. "Maybe I was wrong to believe that University [administrators] meant what they said when they said they were going to support teaching and undergraduate education," Fekete said. "But they have proven by this case that they didn't mean a word they said." The English UAB organized a letter writing campaign in support of Camfield within days of the decision. These letters were directed at SAS Dean Rosemary Stevens, College Dean Robert Rescorla and Provost Stanley Chodorow. The group also wrote up a petition protesting the decision. English UAB member and College senior Michelle Falkoff said the student protest was also against the tenure system itself, which was the subject of much debate this year. Several weeks before Camfield's rejection, Assistant Geology Professor George Boyajian was also refused a permanent position at the University by the same Personnel Committee. However, despite his immense popularity among students, and the fact that he had the unanimous support from his department during his evaluation, Boyajian said at the time that he was not terribly surprised by the Committee's decision. "I have felt from day one that tenure was a crap shoot," he said. "Some people that deserve it probably don't get it -- some people who get it don't deserve it." And in February, the Committee denied full professorship to Associate English Professor Vicki Mahaffey, who is also the graduate chairperson of the English department. More than 40 members of the University community joined together in a demonstration against that decision in front of Van Pelt Library.


Appeals panel rules in favor of U. in 1991 Mayor's Scholarship suit

(06/30/95 9:00am)

Shawnee High School '93 Marlton, N.J. After an unprecedented three re-arguments before the Commonwealth Court, a seven-judge panel ruled in favor of the University and the City of Philadelphia in the long-standing Mayor's Scholarship lawsuit. The vote was four to three. The decision upheld Judge Nelson Diaz's original decision in favor of the University and the city in February 1993. The Public Interest Law Center has vowed to appeal the decision to the state Supreme Court. If the decision is upheld, it will clear the way for the University to award 125 Mayor's Scholarships to University-bound Philadelphia residents over the course of four years. PILCOP had argued that the University was obligated to provide 125 scholarships each year. University General Counsel Shelley Green said she was very pleased with the court's decision. "I'm delighted with the outcome," Green said. "I believe the University's position, and I am pleased the Commonwealth Court has agreed with it." The dispute over the Mayor's Scholarship agreement between the city and the University has been in litigation for the last three years. A 1977 city ordinance required the University to award a set number of scholarships to Philadelphia residents in exchange for rent-free land from the city. PILCOP sued the University in 1991, claiming that the 1977 agreement provided for 125 scholarships per year, for a total of 500 scholarships. The University contends the total should be set at 125. PILCOP attorney Michael Churchill said the Commonwealth Court's decision will have a negative effect on Philadelphia students. "It's a tough day for the students of Philadelphia," Churchill said. "At a time when Philadelphia is trying to improve education and stimulate students, the loss will have a big impact." But Churchill also said he is pleased with the University's effort to expand its recruiting in Philadelphia and lauded the improvement of the Mayor's Scholarship in general. According to University spokesperson Barbara Beck, a 1992 agreement between the University and the city reaffirmed the University's obligation to Philadelphia students. The agreement also substantially enhanced the Mayor's Scholarship financial aid packages. Beck said the average Mayor's Scholarship package includes $18,806 in grants from the University. Mayor's Scholars are selected by the Mayor's Scholarship Committee, whose members are appointed by Mayor Ed Rendell.


GUEST COLUMN: In the End, Vandalism Only Hurts the Students Themselves

(04/24/95 9:00am)

Each year, students discard $100,000 of other students' money. They do it as surely as if they had broken into everyone's bank account, withdrawn the money and thrown it in the trash. How do they do it? Through acts of vandalism, which cost, on average, $100,000 of the money that on-campus students pay in rent. Throughout the year, Resident Advisors write incident reports on nearly every imaginable affront to the residential facilities, ranging from chickens stuffed down toilets, to holes punched in walls, to swastikas carved in doors, to feces left in lounges. Some are disgusting, unsightly or annoying; others pointedly hurtful to other students. In the cases of incidents such as shot off fire extinguishers, smashed exit and hallway lights, pulled fire alarms and burned flyers, they are also a threat to the safety of others. All are expensive. Think of all the money that is wasted as painters, housekeepers, masons, plumbers and electricians take time to respond to all these needless incidents. Then think of all the better ways that money could have been used to enhance the residences. One year's vandalism expenditures might have been used to build a residential fitness center, another to create music practice rooms. Think of all the student programs and activities, or improved service, that $100,000 could buy. Vandalism is not only an affront to the pocketbook, but an affront to the spirit as well. It is demoralizing to live in a community that one's neighbors treat with such disrespect. Before even leaving their buildings in the morning on their way to class, students may be forced to pass: a lounge from which most of the furniture has been stolen; a hole in a corridor wall; a stairwell filled with graffiti; and elevators that have been vandalized and are out of service. These daily encounters surely accumulate to create an overall feeling of alienation and apathy towards one's living environment. Residential Maintenance is forced to buy furnishings for the residences that are as vandal-proof as possible. Rather than aiming for style and comfort, we find ourselves testing new surfaces to see how they will look after they are scribbled on or carved with knives. The University must pay more for furnishings that meet these requirements. Increasingly, we are bolting lounge furniture to the floor, and chaining televisions to the walls to prevent them from "walking" into students' rooms. Now I certainly don't expect that buildings housing hundreds of college students will be in as good condition as Buckingham Palace, but I have seen other colleges with residential lounges that are attractively and comfortably decorated and that manage to survive in that state throughout the year. What can be done? When we are able to identify the culprits, we charge them for the cost of repairing the damage (which is generally far more expensive than students would guess) and take further disciplinary action. But because our staff cannot be everywhere at all times, the culprits are rarely caught. I believe that the only way for this problem to be addressed is for students to take a strong stand on behalf of their communities. They need to intervene and demand that those who engage in this behavior stop. They need to be willing to report other students to their Resident Advisor or to the Department of Residential Living (573-DORM). Students' voices are far more effective than administrators' in letting other students know that they do not want their homes trashed and their money wasted. Join together and let other students know that you're fed up with having your money thrown out the window. Demand that you and your Penn home are treated with the respect both deserve.


Reform the Students, Before the Constitution

(03/23/95 10:00am)

I was sure I wanted to be a part of it. So I picked up a petition, collected signatures from friends, acquaintances, and even people I didn't know, and began campaigning. Postering the bathrooms, handing out slips with my name, knocking on doors -- like most candidates, I learned the key was catchy slogans, no substance. Fortunately, I lost the election. And that was probably the best thing that could have happened to me at Penn. I have learned a lot about student government since then. And the more I have seen, the more I am dissatisfied and the more I am sure that student government is not the most efficient route to truly effect change at this University. It is now almost three years after my run for office and the dawn of a new era in student government is around the corner -- or so the planners of the constitutional reform proposals say. Less bureaucracy. More efficiency. Less overlap. More advocacy. Less internal fighting. More responsibility. These are indeed lofty goals, which if achieved, will be a huge victory for students on campus. But the issue of student governance is far more complex than changing the structure of the system. A new constitution establishes new rules and new priorities, but it does not necessarily bring with it a change in attitude among those elected to serve on the body. Behind any Undergraduate Senate or Undergraduate Assembly is a group of students who can make or break the campus community. Two years ago, one candidate promised to "install Evian machines in the gyms" -- she was elected. Another stated that she was "Kid-tested, mother-approved" -- she also won. This is not a joke. These are the students who are running and winning seats on the campus student government. And because of this, it's no wonder that student government is being ignored by students, faculty members and administrators alike. The way I see it, reforming student government is a double-edged sword: The system should be in working order, but the students must be competent also. This year, for the first time in several years, 40 candidates are running for 25 positions. Last year, it was more like 29 candidates for 25 spots. While this wider field certainly gives students more of a choice than they have had in the past (except for the Nursing spot which is uncontested), the low numbers are an absolute disgrace for a school with an undergraduate population of nearly 10,000. The obvious question which arises for this miniscule pool of candidates is what students can do to make sure their representatives are competent. The most obvious answer is to let students know what the candidates stand for -- not in the form of sound bites which appear in a DP ad and not in the form of colorful flyers. The solutions are simple: campus forums that allow candidates to answer questions on issues, longer campaigning cycles, permitting candidates to speak to the press without having to worry about violating a gag rule. At a university that prides itself on cranking out the leaders of tomorrow, the students must take notice. Representatives like those on the Student Activities Council who voted against funding The Red and Blue should be sent a message that they have no place on campus. While student government reform certainly changes the structure of the system, it is only half of the solution. If given the choice between systematic reform and better student leaders, I would without a doubt pick the latter. Genuine student leaders can represent students regardless of the structure. Genuine student leaders actively solicit comments and suggestions and work to implement them. Genuine student leaders take it upon themselves to change the system if they see its inefficiencies. Genuine student leaders have not yet found their way to the UA body.


GUEST COLUMN: Crimson Tide: Alabama will prevail

(03/15/95 10:00am)

What's in a name? Probably not a lot, unless of course you are Mike Tyson, Michael Jordan or Joe Montana. Most thought that the NCAA was just joking around when it put the Tide in the East Region bracket, let alone put it up against an Ivy League team. Don't be so hasty in judging the Quakers, though. The Quakers step into Baltimore, Md., tomorrow night just stepping off an Ivy League championship. Look out! The Tide, however, cannot say the same thing. No, it did not win any kind of championship, unless you count a second-half laugher against the defending national champion Arkansas Razorbacks in which the Tide shot nearly 30 percent from the floor before finally bowing down to the Hogs. Center Antonio McDyess, much improved from his defensive showings in past games this season, pulled down 20 rebounds against the strong inside attack of the Razorbacks, tying an SEC Tournament record. Forward Jason Caffey, who has been bothered by a lackluster showing from the free-throw line, hit on all of his attempts to improve on his 48-percent shooting from the line thus far. "We have a chance to do some damage in the bracket we were placed in," Caffey said. "I don't know much about Pennsylvania except that they like to slow the game down a little bit." The Tide will hold the definite advantage in the rebounding aspect of the game when it heads into Baltimore Arena for the matchup. The Quakers' game looks to be suffering mainly in that aspect. Penn, which finished 14-0 in Ivy League play this season, pulls down an average of 38.3 boards per game while letting its opponents pull down 38.0. The Tide, however, averages nearly 41.5 a game while limiting its opponents to only 36.8 to lead the SEC. The Tide's Earth-Quakers, 6-foot-11 centers McDyess and Roy Rogers, lead the team in defensive stops. McDyess has 62 blocked shots and 26 steals while Rogers falls closely behind his colleague and current roommate with 64 blocked shots and 10 steals. The 1-2 punch of 6-8 Caffey and 6-7 forward Jamal Faulkner would appear to give the Quakers fits on the inside. The Quakers lack the size to defend Caffey and, should Penn choose to nibble on the bait of the two inside guys, Faulkner will unload his shot from behind the arc where he is shooting close to 40 percent. Wait a minute -- coach David Hobbs might choose to sub for Faulkner, though. Same result for Alabama. Sophomore guard Eric Washington is another perimeter guy who is not afraid to take the ball inside, either. Washington is shooting 42 percent from the perimeter, connecting on 68 of 163 attempts. The Quakers, who like to set the same bait in the inside where size is an opponents' plus, appear to like to kick it back outside as well. Matt Maloney, who statistically appears to be Faulkner's mirror-image, has hit 44 percent of his three-pointers, which seem to come in bushels for him. Maloney has attempted 185 three-point shots this season, connecting on 83. The true test for the Quakers will be their depth. The Quakers, who appear to have several players that like to nap on their team, have only seven players that average double figures in minutes played, which immediately points to the confidence in the depth of his team for Quakers coach Fran Dunphy. Nine out of 13 players for the Tide average over 10 minutes per game. No. 12 seeds are traditionally beaten by No. 5 seeds, and Alabama should not have to worry. When put up against a top 25 SEC team, the Quakers should crack but not break, but that crack should be just big enough for Alabama to creep through. The Quakers, in order to see "Big Country" of Oklahoma State, need to rely on more than what appears to be a good team that takes the court every game. The Quakers need to rely on some luck, also. A little luck is needed to pierce the defense of the Tide. It's not every day that an Ivy League team gets to see reality. It's not every day that an Ivy League team goes against one of the premier teams in the SEC -- the Alabama Crimson Tide. Todd Anderson is Assistant Sports Editor for The Crimson White.


Jerome Allen Born to Lead

(03/15/95 10:00am)

Penn senior guard Jerome Allen is perhaps the most dominant player to wear a Penn uniform in the last decade. You could think of all the times he has taken over a game with 8,700 fans cheering his every move and say that the Palestra is, and always will be, Jerome Allen's house. But perhaps this image is more telling: A hard afternoon's practice has just concluded, but the guys are having way too much fun to leave the Palestra floor. No one is enjoying himself more than Allen. The 22-year-old is a little kid, horsing around with his teammates while engaged in some goofy pickup game. They jaw back and forth. A group led by Ira Bowman has heard enough, and the chase is on. Allen, a huge grin on his face, eludes his pursuers for a while, but eventually they catch him and playfully wrestle him down. Allen appears to be having the time of his life. This is a place in which he feels totally comfortable and secure; a place where he can put the world's daily grind aside and just relax and enjoy life; a place where he is with people he loves, people who love him. You think about all that and realize the Palestra is more than just Jerome Allen's house. It is his home. · If it is his home, then his teammates and coaches are his family. Eleven teammates and four coaches would seem to be a rather large family, but actually it's hardly any bigger than the one in which Allen grew up. The crowded, undersized house in the mean streets of Germantown was home to all sorts of family members. Uncles, aunts and cousins. His mother and a sister. But no father to speak of. Early in Allen's childhood, his dad left the family. "With his father not around, they really had to bond when he was growing up," says Matt Maloney, Allen's fellow senior guard. "They really work hard for each other. That's one of the things that motivates both of them. You really can't ask for a better relationship." One of the things that impressed Penn coach Fran Dunphy most about Allen back when he was recruiting him was his interaction with his mom. "You could see the respect he had for her," Dunphy says. "You would suspect that it would carry over into how he lived his life and how he would be in a team structure." For her part, Nuble cared enough to put in long, sweat-filled hours doing housekeeping and working in various hotels in order to support her son. All along she had one goal in mind for both Allen and his sister -- she wanted them to obtain college degrees. "It would do me real proud to see both of them get their degrees," she says. "I never had that chance. None of my sisters and brothers ever had a chance." While Allen prepares to graduate in May, his sister is in her freshman year at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. · Before Allen got to college there was the matter of high school. He enrolled at the prestigious Episcopal Academy in Marion as a freshman and set about making a name for himself as a basketball player and as a student. His high school basketball coach, Dan Dougherty, says Allen may have had a hard time making the transition from his old neighborhood to the prep-school atmosphere of Episcopal. But whatever problems he had didn't faze him for long. Dougherty taught math to Allen in both his freshman and senior years, so he got a first-hand view of the progress Allen made through his high school career in the classroom. What impressed Dougherty most was the dedication. Allen, he says never had to go to study hall. He was always off in the library studying on his own or going to his teachers for extra help. "He was truly an overachiever," Dougherty says. Allen surpassed expectations in the athletic realm as well. His most surprising accomplishments came not on the court, where he did excel, but on the football field. He only joined the team because, according to school rules, he had to spend his autumns doing something athletically. But by senior year his ability to run the option and throw the ball had earned him the starting job at quarterback. Any university that dreamed of making him a two-sport star a la Charlie Ward, however, had its hopes dashed when Allen announced he was hanging up the pads for good after his final high school game. Basketball had been Allen's true love ever since he was three years old, when he took up the game as a safe and relaxing way to get out of the house, and he wanted to concentrate all his time and energy on it. "If you could open up his chest," his mother says, "you wouldn't see a heart. You would see a basketball." Before either he or Allen came to Penn, Quakers center Tim Krug knew all too well what kind of competitor Allen was. When Allen was a high school junior, he caught a touchdown pass from quarterback Jeb Shanahan to boost Episcopal to a last-second victory over Penn Charter, Krug's alma mater. Four months later, Allen broke Penn Charter's hearts with a little help from Shanahan once again, this time on the hardwood. With sophomore Krug on the opposing side, Allen took a full-court pass from Shanahan and banked in a shot in the final seconds to give Episcopal the win. When it was all over, Allen and current Quakers teammate Eric Moore had led Episcopal's basketball team to a combined record of 53-3 in their final two seasons. Dougherty will never forget what they meant to his program. "In 37 years as a coach, I've had a lot of great players," he said. "I've never seen two kids push themselves to their limit more than those two did. I'm very proud of them as a coach." · Looking back on the four years he has spent with Allen, Dunphy also has much to be proud about. What pleases Dunphy as much as Allen's accomplishments on the court is his growth as a person. He has made immense strides from the time he was a shy, insecure freshman who appeared somewhat overwhelmed by his surroundings. "I see somebody who knows he is a good person, somebody who is not afraid to speak up and not afraid to challenge his teammates," Dunphy says. "He's also quite comfortable challenging himself, and that's the true sign of somebody who wants to be the best he can." Most who know Allen say he is normally rather reserved and quiet. When the time is right, though, he is eager to step up and take charge. Often times in practice, Allen will make suggestions as to how to run a particular set on offense or on defense. Dunphy is more than willing to listen. "At this point," Dunphy says, "I would be foolish not to trust in his judgment." "He's a very good leader," Maloney says. "He's just a terrific guy. He'll help you out any way he can. He always keeps in touch with everyone and looks out for his teammates." Senior forward Shawn Trice, Allen's roommate for three years, knows that as well as anybody. Trice was taken in by the Allen household and treated as one of their own upon his arrival in West Philadelphia. Allen showed him around town and provided a second home for the Detroit native stuck 1,500 miles away from his real home. Trice was also invited to stay with Allen and his family for the summer after their freshman year and last year so the two of them could work on their basketball and conditioning together at Penn. "It just shows what kind of people he and his family are," Trice says. "He's the most caring person, the most sharing person I've known." · Allen is every bit as sharing on the court as he is off it. He led the Ivies in assists this year with 5.8 per game, demonstrating an unselfishness that has NBA scouts salivating as much as his ability to slash right through defenses. Senior forward Scott Kegler says when he gets open shots, nine times out of 10 it's because Allen is getting him those shots. "He doesn't get caught up with scoring points and doing well statistically," Kegler says. "He really dictates how the game is going to go. A great player makes everyone around him better, and that's what he does." He does it because winning means everything to him. Sometimes that does mean he has to forget about his teammates and shoulder the load himself. That's why he took -- and hit -- most of the shots down the stretch a year ago at Temple when the rest of the Quakers seemed awed just by being on the same court as Eddie Jones and Aaron McKie. That's why, with the entire team struggling to find shots in the final minutes at Michigan, Allen chose not to follow the play Dunphy called -- which had Allen passing the ball back out to Maloney or Kegler for a three-point shot -- after he penetrated past Jimmy King. Allen wanted the team to win or lose the game with him. He put up what Krug called "a 10-foot, one-handed, hook-shot leaner" that swished through the net to give the Quakers one of their biggest wins in a long time. That's also why former USC coach George Raveling selected Allen to be part of an elite corps of 12 of the best collegiate players in the country representing the United States in the Goodwill Games this past summer. Players with far more notoriety were passed over, because Raveling knew Allen could do one thing -- win. Playing time was less than what Allen was used to, but he made the most of every opportunity. "He's very culturable," Raveling says. "He hung in there against difficult odds. We all got more and more confidence in him as time went on." Raveling says Allen's unselfish play at the point against Russia in the bronze medal game was one of the prime reasons the U.S. was able to come out on top. The next stop for Allen, according to most in the know, is the NBA. Last season, Raveling called Allen a potential lottery pick. Dunphy was unsure where Allen would be picked, but he did know what the team that drafts Allen will be getting. "To me he'll have a 10- or 12-year career," Dunphy says. "He may not be the leading scorer on his team, but he'll help his team win. That's the biggest value he'll have to an organization -- the ability to help it win." Moore figures Allen will quickly earn enough money to retire on. "But he's not just about that," Moore says. "He really wants to play and do well. He's a good individual and that's hard to find in the NBA these days." · But money does mean a little something, of course. Money will be needed for Allen to buy his mom her dream house and allow her to take it easy after all the work she has done for him. "That makes me feel proud," Janet Nuble says. "I'd have to keep working, though. I wouldn't just live off my child. He's worked hard for that. He's earned it and it's his." Allen's relationship with his mother illustrates perhaps the most significant aspect of his personality. More than anything, more than money or winning championships, more even than the game of basketball itself, Allen values human relationships. It is why, when he graduates, he will miss his teammates more than anything else -- passing the time with them on the bus ride up to Dartmouth with a blizzard raging outside; hanging out with Trice and Maloney during the summers; horsing around with Bowman after a long afternoon's practice. The affection could not be more mutual. "He's definitely one of the people I've met throughout my life that I'm really glad to have been a part of his life," Maloney says. "It's going to benefit me in pretty much every part of my life just knowing him, knowing where he's come from, what he's been through and how successful he's been." "I've cherished every moment that kid has brought to our basketball program," Dunphy says. "He will always have a special little space in my heart." Here at Penn, he will always have a home.


COLUMN: An Artificial

(02/08/95 10:00am)

From Marc Teillon's "The Public Pillory," Fall '95 Even community service is as easy as one two three. Call up UNICEF, give them my credit card number and let the computers charge me seventeen cents a day. My good deed for the year is done and I only had to give up one measly cup of coffee. As far as sexual experience is concerned, progressive society has covered that as well. In case your mother doesn't believe you read Playboy for the interviews and forbids your subscription, there are convenience stores and newsstands at every corner selling airbrushed hussies and Latoya Jackson. If you are worried about hair on your palms or simply missed the Joycelyn Elders press conference on self-gratification, never fear. Technology has come to the rescue. Just strap on the sensors and goggles and presto -- a beautiful women, who wouldn't even let me take her to dinner, wants to do the electronic tango for three bucks and some change. Think about it. No embarrassing trips to buy condoms, no fatal diseases, no morning regrets. Just the market satisfying the demand and video arcade owners as pimps. If a politician feels compelled to intervene because some nutty religious constituent is haranguing in his ear about the immorality of high-tech whoring, then the government should hire an economist to do cost-benefit analysis to ensure the socially optimal output if virtual reality orgies are produced. Anyway, people are sick of taxes and as long as cigarettes, those evil products that trick consumers into addiction, are getting beaten to death by the lobbyists, a pornography tax might not be a bad way to generate a little revenue. Over the holiday break, I had my wisdom teeth removed and continued my virtual reality experience. For three days straight I sat on the couch, lamented my swollen appearance, and caught up on all the fantasies I neglected for the previous four months. Despite the time I lost to channel surfing, I have come to one conclusion: experience today is artificial, a technological surrogate for the real thing. This probably explains the rage over the show The Real World where viewers can live vicariously through third-rate comedians and odd-looking men who refer to themselves in the third person. Follow them through their jobs and relationships and if your lucky, you might develop pseudo-friendships with Pedro and Puck. When I lived at home the summer after my freshman year, I didn't know half the people on my street. But I sure knew everything about Eric the surfing econ major making fun of Jon, the wanna-be Garth Brooks, for sitting around all day and doing nothing but drink cool-aid and listening to country music. Kind of ironic. It was like I was living in San Francisco but wasn't. I avoided life like I avoid it every time I play Sega Genesis because I feel like blowing off my accounting homework or avoiding going to class. Life is hard, and all computer graphics, video games and music synthesizers want to give us is the good without the evil, the beauty without the pain. This may seem admirable, but having someone else do all our work is never the same as doing it ourselves. By no means am I suggesting that all technology is evil or even bad. Television brought information into our living rooms and the Internet speeds up the process. But, as a cultural critic once said, "Television [and for that matter most other technological components of popular culture] makes us all passive and impotent spectators of a fantastic world, which little by little replaces the real world of every day life." A tool is an instrument assisting the body in accomplishing the task. This implement makes man stronger or faster or more efficient. But once man becomes an extension of the machine, he is made weak and servile. If television allows you to have instantaneous updates on the happenings in Congress and on the stock markets, then television is not an idiot box but a tool. If not, and you find yourself skipping classes to watch soap operas or halfbacks on Court TV, then close the blinds and lock the doors and make sure life does not interrupt the technological fantasies and electronic sensations. Oh, the vanity of it all! Marc Teillon is a junior Finance major from Liverpool, N.Y. The Public Pillory appears alternate Wednesdays.


EDITORIAL: A Well-Rounded Education

(02/03/95 10:00am)

We applaud the WhartonWe applaud the WhartonSchool and the CollegeWe applaud the WhartonSchool and the Collegeof Arts and SciencesWe applaud the WhartonSchool and the Collegeof Arts and Sciencesfor allowing WhartonWe applaud the WhartonSchool and the Collegeof Arts and Sciencesfor allowing Whartonstudents to minor inWe applaud the WhartonSchool and the Collegeof Arts and Sciencesfor allowing Whartonstudents to minor inthe College.We applaud the WhartonSchool and the Collegeof Arts and Sciencesfor allowing Whartonstudents to minor inthe College._________________________ But the need for exposure to all different fields of study does not solely apply to Wharton students. College, Engineering and Nursing students should have this same luxury so that they can pursue a more diverse education as well. Wharton and the College are already working to provide College students with the same opportunities. But we urge the Engineering and Nursing schools to join Wharton and the College in a University-wide program which would allow any student from any other school to hold a minor in the school of their choice. This type of all encompassing program would provide all students with the equal opportunity to experience a wide array of academic fields and would be a perfect fit for the One University concept.


OPINION: Haiti - The Aftermath

(01/30/95 10:00am)

Danielle Jean-Guillaume "I'm sorry, but some people 'round the world are just going to have to die and the Haitians may sometimes be among them." Do you recognize the humor in this statement? Neither did we. Yet, in his article entitled "One Man's Vision of Haiti" published in The Red and Blue, Jeremy Hildreth suggests that his point of view is "actually pretty funny." However, while attempting to present an argument against U.S. intervention in Haiti, Hildreth clearly demonstrates the depth of his insensitivity and prejudice. Naturally angered and hurt by the author's offensive and unsubstantiated message, the executive board members of Dessalines Haitian Student Association responded. With the intention of providing a beneficial learning experience in light of the hatred expressed, Dessalines planned a meeting for the parties involved. Unfortunately, Hildreth, President Rodin and her administration did not share our enthusiasm. Despite the fact that we clearly expressed our acknowledgment of the author's right to freely express himself, we have been accused of advocating censorship. It must be acknowledged that our complaints are not due to our differing opinions, but rather to Hildreth's attempt to present his opinion as factually based. He abuses his First Amendment right, disregarding its value while using it as a tool for discrimination. When will our community take a stand against the obvious bigotry and hatred that permeates this campus and manifests itself in the form of "literature?" The overwhelming apathy that exists at Penn is so destructive that even those personally targeted, as well as other community members, do not see the absurdity of the attack. Peruvian sophomore Felix Estrada supports Hildreth's description of Haiti in his DP guest column of December 8, 1994. In addition, he disregards the value of his own nation, describing Peru as a "pathetic country." While Estrada agrees that the article insults Haitian people, he admits that his opinion would be different if he were Haitian. Is this acceptable? Communication between individuals of differing cultures and beliefs does not exist in the form of insult. Must every individual in the Penn community suffer a personal attack before we acknowledge this? It is obvious that there is a need for dispelling myths about Haiti as well as discussion about Haitian issues such as American intervention in Haiti. Effort towards dialogue between members of this community will be thwarted when bigotry is at the root of the discussion. Therefore, in the interest of avoiding such negativity, we are organizing a public forum to discuss relevant issues. We encourage all members of the Penn community to take an active role in this program. We also invite all to join us in our second annual celebration of Haitian Solidarity Week beginning February 6. The theme of our celebration is "Breaking Down the Barriers." Individuals who have devoted their lives to the study of Haiti and its culture have been invited to share their expertise. We are confident that they will help us to break down barriers at Penn. Colette Lamothe is a junior anthropology major from Newark, N.J. She is president of the Dessalines Haitian Student Association. Danielle Jean-Guillaume is a senior biology major from XXXXXX, Conn. She is corresponding secretary of the Dessalines Haitian Student Association.


COLUMN: Rodin Starts Her Second Semester

(01/19/95 10:00am)

As we begin the spring semester, I want to share some thoughts I have had regarding several recent issues on campus. In just the past six months, three unrelated incidents have understandably disturbed and offended members of our community. Specifically, many were affronted by research funding received by a faculty member from an outside foundation accused of supporting neo-Nazi and racist agendas, by a student's article on Haiti published by a campus publication, and by the retrospective exhibit of Andres Serrano's photographs at the Institute of Contemporary Art, especially the notorious "Piss Christ." Not surprisingly, the common cry in response to each of these incidents has been: "Why doesn't the University stop this!" This is a heartfelt demand and it deserves a clear response. We "permit" these events because, first, in truth, we can never wholly prevent them -- and in each of these recent cases, those responsible acted legally, were clearly identified, and did not hide behind the illicit screens of anonymity or vandalism. Second, we permit them because tolerating the intolerable idea is the price of the freedom of expression without which we cannot survive as an academic institution. But third, and most importantly, we permit them because doing so is the only way to change things. Hearing the hateful is the only way to identify and educate the hater. Seeing the offensive is a necessary step to understanding and rejecting the perspective from which it comes. Seriously considering even the most distasteful idea is the absolute precondition to arguing effectively against it. By mission and by tradition, universities are open forums in which competing beliefs, philosophies, and values contend. Some will appear ill-informed, disrespectful, vengeful; in exposing and challenging them, their flaws become self-evident. That is why we do not close off debate by official pronouncement. That is why we must use such incidents to promote debate, to spotlight the hater, and to expose the hateful to the light of day. In recent months, I have been especially pleased to see the responsible way in which those offended by the Serrano exhibit voiced their protest in outspoken, but reasoned and appropriate arguments, and then worked constructively with the Institute of Contemporary Art to create a forum for the public discussion of their concerns. Those who have been outraged regarding the article published in The Red and Blue have been encouraged to do likewise. We as a community are learning to use public discussion and debate to educate one another and to assert our views. It is my hope that, in the future, those who know they may offend --while free to exercise their right of open expression -- will, as a matter of simple courtesy, open a dialogue ahead of time with groups or individuals they know will be affected by their exercise of that right. It is vital that we reach out to each other in this way, because we can learn to use the freedom of ideas and expression to educate rather than to wound. The University administration's job is to support such dialogue and debate, not to cut it off; to create an environment in which we can educate each other, not one in which doctrine or orthodoxy are legislated from on high. Will we provide "moral leadership" to the Penn community? Absolutely. But moral leadership requires suasion not censorship, conscience not coercion. Most of all, it requires insisting that we -- all of us -- talk about what troubles us. We must all use such occasions to fulfill the University's educational mission for each other. Part of that mission is to educate for leadership, and we must each take responsibility to respond to our own moral compass in ways that better the life of our community. Words are the life-blood of our university. For all their limitations, even if they sometimes drive us apart, words are what bind us together in the academy. Martin Luther King, Jr., understood the power of words. He believed that we must use them to talk about the difficult and painful issues that divide us, about race and about religion, about politics and about power, about gender and about identity. But I urge you to choose carefully the words you use. The words of hatred and bigotry, insult and ignorance, destroy dialogue and community and must be answered. I hope the day will come when no one in our community will use such words or inflict pain on others with intent. But until then, when we are faced with words of offense and awfulness, we must draw those who use them into the dialogue of ideas. That is the essential precondition of the dynamics of change. That is why we may censure speech, but never censor speakers. In the last two years, this community has found that we cannot, with policies and procedures, legislate the unlegislatable. If we can learn this lesson and put it into practice, then we can create together a model community in which individual and group differences form a mosaic, not a melting pot that tries to makes them in a homogenous mix. We are a community of different identities, and we must create a context in which a true diversity of views and opinions, persons and groups, politics and perspectives, is nurtured, valued and shared. But let us raise the level of the discourse, dispense with the intention to hurt, and each take more responsibility for all the members of our community. In that spirit, I welcome you back from winter vacation to the exciting challenges that lie ahead. Judith Rodin has served as president of the University since last July.


COLUMN: Parental Guidance

(11/08/94 10:00am)

From Charlotte Druckman "Putting It Bluntly," Fall '94 Of course, this year, in an attempt to become more sensitive to the feelings of siblings or cousins and to show the folks how p.c. the campus is, the administration has unveiled a new label "family weekend," to replace the ever-popular "parents' weekend." This year, "family weekend" takes on yet another function along with its new name -- it marks the end of fraternity rush and the extension of bids to the future brothers of the Greek system. Now, parents will be glad they came down to Penn for one of two reasons; either to give a fond farewell to the son they will lose to the next five months of pledging, or to provide a shoulder to cry on for the bidless child. "Family weekend" is beneficial to the rushees because it forces them to get out and do something with their parents instead of sitting in their rooms in a tizzy, worrying about their futures in the great social circle we like to call Greek Life. One of my friends explained to me, that in a nutshell, our parents come here so that they can see "how we live," and observe us in our college environment. While this may be the case, what our parents are actually viewing is not a true slice of college life, but rather a skewed version, custom-made to render college a series of well-planned meals combined with a 'civilized' football game, some optional lectures (guaranteed to have our parents hounding us about our futures -- or lack thereof) and Locust Walk in its autumn splendor. It all starts this Friday when parents are invited to sit in on their children's classes. Little do the parents know, this may be the first time all year that little Tony has bothered to show up for that 10 a.m. French class on Friday. The truth is, it is not easy for many parents to make it here on time for most of our Friday classes -- if we have any, and frankly, most of these classes are over before 2:00 pm. So, although the concept of permitting parents to sit in on classes is a nifty one, it's rather like inviting someone to come sunbathe at your country home on a rainy day. And it's a shame that everyone's parents can't see what classes are like and how we are learning, because it is supposedly towards this educational end they are paying $25,000 a year. When all else fails, there's always the football game -- that tradition steeped in Penn pride where everyone gathers together to chat and watch our men in red and blue "put the ball across the line." Come on, students know what really goes on at a football game. You get drunk with a bunch of your friends, paint your faces red and blue, and shout curses in the middle of a garbled cheer that celebrates a Penn touchdown. But, our parents get a drastically different image when their children are on their best behavior and have to sit with Mom and Dad. In fact, the only "legitimate" action of student life that parents can glimpse at the game, is toast throwing. That's when they find out where their tuition money is really going -- to pay for a machine that picks up toast. It must be really encouraging for our parents to know that instead of doing our work we're making toast. The football game is merely an activity to fill the time between lunch and dinner. Meals are essential to "family weekend." First there is the dilemma of where to take the crew and whether or not to make eating a social event and invite your friends and their parents to come along too. Dining is either filled with superficial schmoozing between parents who wish their children could have met different friends so they wouldn't have to sit with "these people" in the first place. Or, if one opts to eat with one's parents alone, one embarks on a pleasant discussion about one's grades. Please note, at this time, students are in the midst of midterms or have just gotten back their first tests of the year and do not wish to discuss the possibility that they are "up the creek without a paddle" with their parents. If you have to take a midterm or write a ten-page research paper, then you know you have more important things to do than chill with your parents. Maybe our parents think that when they take us home at 10 p.m. on Saturday, we will sit down to do some work. Why else do we have such noticeable circles under our eyes the next morning? It is basically a given that students do not go into much detail about what goes on "after dark" with their parents, and while most parents may have some idea in the back of their minds (a leftover from their own college days) some might actually be clueless and there is certainly no need to enlighten them. Okay, although our parents may not be getting an accurate picture of college life, they are able to see that their children are happy (despite the fact their daughter lives lives in a 7' by 13' cubicle with mice). At the bottom of it, in our heart of hearts, we know how much we miss our parents and how great it feels to have them taking care of us for two days -- even if we feel smothered and have to put our social lives on hold. Charlotte Druckman is a sophomore English major from New York City. Putting It Bluntly appears alternate Tuesdays.


COLUMN: Parental Guidance

(11/08/94 10:00am)

From Charlotte Druckman's "Putting It Bluntly," Fall '94 Of course, this year, in an attempt to become more sensitive to the feelings of siblings or cousins and to show the folks how p.c. the campus is, the administration has unveiled a new label "family weekend," to replace the ever-popular "parents' weekend." This year, "family weekend" takes on yet another function along with its new name -- it marks the end of fraternity rush and the extension of bids to the future brothers of the Greek system. Now, parents will be glad they came down to Penn for one of two reasons; either to give a fond farewell to the son they will lose to the next five months of pledging, or to provide a shoulder to cry on for the bidless child. "Family weekend" is beneficial to the rushees because it forces them to get out and do something with their parents instead of sitting in their rooms in a tizzy, worrying about their futures in the great social circle we like to call Greek Life. One of my friends explained to me, that in a nutshell, our parents come here so that they can see "how we live," and observe us in our college environment. While this may be the case, what our parents are actually viewing is not a true slice of college life, but rather a skewed version, custom-made to render college a series of well-planned meals combined with a 'civilized' football game, some optional lectures (guaranteed to have our parents hounding us about our futures -- or lack thereof) and Locust Walk in its autumn splendor. It all starts this Friday when parents are invited to sit in on their children's classes. Little do the parents know, this may be the first time all year that little Tony has bothered to show up for that 10 a.m. French class on Friday. The truth is, it is not easy for many parents to make it here on time for most of our Friday classes -- if we have any, and frankly, most of these classes are over before 2:00 pm. So, although the concept of permitting parents to sit in on classes is a nifty one, it's rather like inviting someone to come sunbathe at your country home on a rainy day. And it's a shame that everyone's parents can't see what classes are like and how we are learning, because it is supposedly towards this educational end they are paying $25,000 a year. When all else fails, there's always the football game -- that tradition steeped in Penn pride where everyone gathers together to chat and watch our men in red and blue "put the ball across the line." Come on, students know what really goes on at a football game. You get drunk with a bunch of your friends, paint your faces red and blue, and shout curses in the middle of a garbled cheer that celebrates a Penn touchdown. But, our parents get a drastically different image when their children are on their best behavior and have to sit with Mom and Dad. In fact, the only "legitimate" action of student life that parents can glimpse at the game, is toast throwing. That's when they find out where their tuition money is really going -- to pay for a machine that picks up toast. It must be really encouraging for our parents to know that instead of doing our work we're making toast. The football game is merely an activity to fill the time between lunch and dinner. Meals are essential to "family weekend." First there is the dilemma of where to take the crew and whether or not to make eating a social event and invite your friends and their parents to come along too. Dining is either filled with superficial schmoozing between parents who wish their children could have met different friends so they wouldn't have to sit with "these people" in the first place. Or, if one opts to eat with one's parents alone, one embarks on a pleasant discussion about one's grades. Please note, at this time, students are in the midst of midterms or have just gotten back their first tests of the year and do not wish to discuss the possibility that they are "up the creek without a paddle" with their parents. If you have to take a midterm or write a ten-page research paper, then you know you have more important things to do than chill with your parents. Maybe our parents think that when they take us home at 10 p.m. on Saturday, we will sit down to do some work. Why else do we have such noticeable circles under our eyes the next morning? It is basically a given that students do not go into much detail about what goes on "after dark" with their parents, and while most parents may have some idea in the back of their minds (a leftover from their own college days) some might actually be clueless and there is certainly no need to enlighten them. Okay, although our parents may not be getting an accurate picture of college life, they are able to see that their children are happy (despite the fact their daughter lives lives in a 7' by 13' cubicle with mice). At the bottom of it, in our heart of hearts, we know how much we miss our parents and how great it feels to have them taking care of us for two days -- even if we feel smothered and have to put our social lives on hold. Charlotte Druckman is a sophomore English major from New York City. Putting It Bluntly appears alternate Tuesdays.


GREAT GAMES IN PENN HISTORY '84: Penn rips Big Green for crown

(11/08/94 10:00am)

Nov. 21, 1983, The DP -- He never doubted. Not in the beginning, when he became the head coach of a team that had won one game in three years. Not after his first season, the 1-9 season, when it seemed that his players would never learn how to win. And not going into this season, when a championship had been won and there was still so much more to do, so much more to accomplish. He didn't doubt on Saturday either, when in the first quarter at Franklin Field his team did little to show it was concerned with winning the Ivy League title. The Quakers gained a total of 17 yards in their first two series. They punted twice. "We were going to be a little conservative at the beginning," said Berndt, whose Quakers will share the Ivy title with Harvard. "We just didn't want to create a turnover situation. We just said we'd go out and dominate up front." "It was in the game plan that we would sputter," Penn co-captain Marc Hembrough added. "Because even if we did, we knew sooner or later we'd put it together." So the Quakers sputtered on those first two drives. And then, in a six-minute span of the second quarter, everything came together. The way it was supposed to. The offensive line did what it was supposed to -- open up holes for the running backs and allow quarterback John McGeehan time to throw. On the first touchdown drive, which began with 1 minute, 6 seconds left in the opening period, fullback Chuck Nolan gained 24 of his career-high 130 yards and McGeehan completed three passes. Penn went 88 yards in 13 plays, scoring on Nolan's one-yard burst. Dave Shulman's extra point -- he made all five of his attempts and kicked a 45-yard field goal in the game -- made it 7-0. "Our offensive line just did the job today," said McGeehan, who completed 9 of 16 passes for 109 yards and one touchdown in the game. "There's no doubt about it, there's no way anyone else can take credit." Then the defense, the backbone of Berndt's game plan, the group that was counted on to dominate Dartmouth and provide field position for the offense, did what it was supposed to. On the first play of the Big Green's next series, a hit by Penn sophomore defensive back Duane Hewlett caused Dartmouth's Mattey Lopes to fumble after catching a pass from quarterback Frank Polsinello (11-16, 165 yards, 1 TD, 1 INT). Quaker linebacker Peter Gallagher recovered the fumble on the Dartmouth 26. Five plays later, Steve Ortman took a pitch to his left for one yard and Penn's second touchdown. Dartmouth's next series lasted twice as long as the previous one -- two plays. Rich Lena ran two yards on the first play. A Polsinello pass was intercepted by nose guard Joe Lorenc on the second play, after being tipped by defensive tackle Tom Gilmore. The offense took over on the Big Green 31. Again Penn needed just five plays to score. Again it was Nolan who scored the touchdown, this time from two yards out. And so it was 21-0 at the end of the half. "They created problems for themselves," Berndt said of the Big Green. "Their turnovers gave us a whole new perspective. They did just what we didn't want to do -- turn over the ball." At the end of the third quarter, it was 31-0. There was Shulman's field goal and a nine-yard touchdown pass from McGeehan to Pat Buehler. That play capped a 36-yard drive which was set up by an illegal participation penalty on Dartmouth during a punt return. The week before, in the 28-0 loss to Harvard, the same mistake cost the Quakers a touchdown. But this was the most decisive win by Penn in a league game in 10 years, not a shutout defeat. This was different. "Harvard controlled us," McGeehan said. "That can happen when a team controls the line of scrimmage. It was the same thing this week. But we were the ones controlled." Harvard sacked McGeehan and backup Jim Crocicchia six times last week. Penn sacked Dartmouth Polsinello 10 times on Saturday, for a net loss of 85 yards. "We mixed it up," said linebacker Kevin Bradley, who was one of nine Quakers to contribute in the sacks. "Everyone was coming and going, from the front, the back and the middle. After a while, they didn't know what to expect." What was the difference in the defense, which had allowed 62 points in the two previous weeks? "We played better," Berndt said. "We played against two great offensive teams the last two weeks. We didn't make any changes. We just played better." Penn scored its final touchdown in the fourth quarter on a 29-yard drive directed by Crocicchia, after Ken Coombs made the team's fourth fumble recovery. A 79-yard touchdown pass from Polsinello to Mike Viccora came when the score was 38-0. And when Dartmouth scored its second touchdown, on the last play of the game, the goal post in the west end zone had already been torn down. Last year, the crowd did not storm the field until Shulman's field goal had given Penn a 23-21 win over Harvard and a share of the Ivy title. This year, the celebration of the championship could begin before the game ended. This year, there was never a doubt. "We haven't been this prepared for a game in a long time," Berndt said. "We told our squad every day this week that we needed to be ready to play. And as unemotional as this team was, this was an emotional effort." In the locker room afterward, Berndt and the team shouted "Two, Two, Two," in acknowledgement of the second championship. And then spontaneously, the chant became "Three, Three, Three." "Why not be better than we have been?" Berndt asked the members of the media in the post-game interview. "Let's win three in a row. Let's go undefeated. Let's win the Lambert Cup (the award given to the best college football team in the East)." He wouldn't mind winning the title outright, either. Penn, which went 5-1-1 in the league, 6-3-1 overall, is again a co-champion, sharing the crown with Harvard. The Crimson defeated Yale 16-7 in the 100th edition of The Game on Saturday. So Berndt is thinking about a third championship, an outright championship. And he denied the rumor that he will leave Penn to coach Syracuse next year. Going into this season, he had a new challenge. In his two years at DePauw and two years at Penn, he was always rebuilding. He never had to coach a defending champion. This year, he did. But Berndt never doubted. And neither did his players. "Three years ago, our attitude was, 'Let's just survive the game,' " Berndt said. "But the players believe in themselves now, and that's the whole key -- they believe in one another and what we ask them to do." This year, he asked them to help him establish a winning football tradition at the University of Pennsylvania. Amd now it is done. The players smoked cigars when it was over. Berndt sipped a diet soda. "I'd have to say right now that we've turned [the program] around," Berndt said. "I wouldn't say that last year. But this sure wasn't luck -- it was tougher for us this year." "Our long-range goal this year," Berndt continued, "was to win the championship for the second consecutive year. People get tired of me saying this, but we've done something no other team in Pennsylvania history has ever done. "We've won back-to-back championships."


GUEST COLUMN: "Candidates and the Environment – Where they Stand

(11/07/94 10:00am)

The 1990s began as the "environmental decade," when students on 2,000 campuses nationwide organized events and recycling programs for Earth Day, the largest organized student demonstration in history. But the hopes of Earth Day have not been realized and the expectations raised by the pro-environmental promises of the current administration have been lowered as this Congress has been the most hostile toward the environment since the original Earth Day in 1970. Many students at Penn are working with Campus Green Vote, which is part of the national effort of Youth Vote '94. Together, they are committed to the involvement of young people in democracy and are working to register over a quarter of a million people to vote in this election year. Campus Green Vote focuses on increasing the environmental awareness of young people. As a non-partisan group, we do not endorse any candidates, but we do seek to make voters aware of the environmental stances of the candidates, and urge them to vote for the candidates they feel are more sensitive to environmental issues. The congressional issues we are focusing on are the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Endangered Species Act. The Clean Water Act, enacted in 1972 to eliminate the discharge of pollutants in our waterways and make our waves "swimmable and fishable" needs to be reauthorized and strengthened. Currently, 30 percent of our rivers and more than 50 percent of our lakes are not safe for swimming or fishing and half the states have issued health advisories urging only limited consumption of fish due to mercury contamination. According to the U.S. Public Interest Research Group, 97% of the nation's largest industrial discharges violated their discharge permits in 1990. In addition, the lobbying efforts of the chemical manufacturers have crippled strong legislation: 268 political action committees connected to companies lobbying against a strengthened Clean Water Act, gave $56 million to Congressional candidates between 1987 and 1993. The Safe Drinking Water Act, passed to protect citizens by preventing contamination of public water supplies, is being violated in every state. In the two years it has taken Congress to try to reauthorize the bill, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that over 1.8 million people became sick and more than 1,800 died from drinking contaminated water. The most serious example was in 1993 when 400,000 people in Milwaukee became sick from contaminated tap water and more than 100 people died. The Endangered Species Act, our nation's most fundamental tool to protect species threatened with extinction, has saved hundreds of species which are often the source of new pharmaceuticals. One example is the Pacific Yew tree, found in Oregon and Washington. The Yew contains taxol, currently used to treat breast cancer. Yet the deceptively named "wise use" movement, a coalition of anti-environmental corporations are working to cut the act. It is important to know where the local candidates stand on these important issues. The candidates for governor are Republican Tom Ridge and Democrat Mark Singel. Ridge has proposed federal legislation to allow a site-by-site determination on the extent of cleanup necessary, which would limit a landowner's future liability after initial cleanup efforts are completed, and would allow varying levels of cleanup efforts depending on the intended use of the site. His Congressional voting record vs. the League of Conservation Voters, a non-partisan environmental action group was 20% in 1993 and 13% in 1991-92 (100% would indicate support in every environmental vote). Ridge is not endorsed by the Sierra Club because he supports weakening of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, opposes existing and proposed legislation that would lead to cleaner air, and he voted against or was absent on 16 out of 20 crucial environmental votes. Singel, the incumbent, is a supporter of new taxes on polluters. He initiated a "buy recycled" pledge campaign in which local companies and business organizations agree to set goals in the amount of recycled goods they purchase over the course of a year. He supports the fund designed to protect Michigan's Great Lakes. As chairman of the Pennsylvania Energy Office, he promoted marketing and public acceptance of electric vehicles. He is endorsed by the Sierra Club because he wants to strengthen the Department of Environmental Resources and he supports existing highway trust funds for public transportation. The candidates for the highly contested senatorial seat are incumbent Democrat Harris Wofford and current Congressional Representative, Republican Rick Santorum. Wofford has worked to protect Pennsylvania state parks and forests from the harmful effects of planes flown out of nearby military bases, and has attempted to limit out of state trash imports. He supports international cooperation in protecting the environment and the incorporation of environmental concerns in trade agreements. He is also endorsed by the Sierra Club. He voted in favor of the Safe Drinking Water Act and he voted for the passage of the Endangered Species Act, which Santorum voted against. Wofford's Congressional Voting Record vs. the League of Conservation Voters was 94% in 1993, 67% in 1992 and 86% in 1991, while Santorum's record was 25% in 1993, 19% in 1992, and 0% in 1991. Santorum believes that the best way to reach environmental goals is with the use of economic incentives. He also advocates flexibility for state and local governments in addressing environmental contamination. Santorum thinks the economic security of industries should be considered when legislating environmental goals. The debate around these critical environmental issues will continue into the next Congress. Voters have a unique opportunity this election to turn the tide in protecting our health, our water and our eco-systems. Young voters will be leading the charge, just as they did in 1992, when over two million new young voters turned out to the polls, resulting in the largest increase in youth turn-out since 18 year-olds were first given the right to vote. Campus Green Vote urges you to take a few minutes out of your day tomorrow and take the time to vote. And when you do, consider the stances of the candidates on these important environmental issues. David Lagstein is a College senior from Franklin Lakes, New Jersey. He is a member of Campus Green Vote.