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Vice Provost for Research to step down

(06/22/95 9:00am)

and Amy Lipman Vice Provost for Research Barry Cooperman announced on Tuesday that he will be stepping down from his position September 1. "It's been a long time," he said. "I have been Vice Provost for 13 years." Provost Stanley Chodorow said holding the position for a period of more than 10 years is an extraordinary accomplishment. "The length of his tenure alone indicates that Vice Provost Cooperman has done a superb job," he said. "No one who was not first-rate and who was not making a major contribution to the University could have stayed on that long." Cooperman, who has been a member of the faculty since 1968, is now going back to teaching Chemistry full-time. He said he was frustrated during his tenure, because he did not have the opportunity to conduct extensive research for himself, although he was happy to be able to teach at least one class each year. He will still be directing the French Institute for Culture and Technology and chairing the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Wistar Institute. Chodorow said this is good timing for Cooperman to make this move. "He has excellent support from the [National Institutes of Health,] and this an ideal time for him to go back to teaching and research full-time," he said. Cooperman said he would have left his position earlier if it were not for two factors. He said he wanted to see the Institute for Advanced Science and Technology -- a project who's history goes back to 1987 -- go through as a project. Last month, the Air Force released its Record of Decision, giving the University the last piece of governmental information it needs to demolish Smith Hall and begin the construction of the high-tech building. He added that the IAST product is something that he is very proud of. "I hope there will be an actual tangible product when I step down on September 1st," Cooperman said. He added that he wanted to serve as a bridge between the old administration and the new administration. And Chodorow said he was happy for this assistance. "From my personal experience during the past year, I can say that I am very glad indeed that he gave me a year," he said. "He helped to orient me to Penn, he accomplished several important projects, beside IAST, and he gave me good advice and support when I needed it. I've enjoyed working with him." Chodorow added that he will now try to find a member of the senior faculty to serve as Acting Vice Provost, but added that he does not expect to find a permanent replacement until the fall. "I expect to start the preliminary phases of a search for a permanent replacement during the summer, but the search will only gather steam when the faculty return from their summer activities," he said. Cooperman said the University has changed its position to become more highly ranked as a research institution under his leadership. But although he said he has made numerous improvements in the research program during his tenure as Vice Provost, he added that there are still some deficiencies. The issue he is most concerned about is providing mechanisms for financing institutions in the University. He said he believes in the University's credo that good research and good teaching go hand in hand. Cooperman said the Rodin administration is still searching for how it will deal with research, adding that its challenge will be to determine its priorities. But he said he is positive they will succeed. "In the long-term, I am quite optimistic for Penn and research in general," he said.


U. tests new AIDS vaccine

(06/22/95 9:00am)

The University Medical Center is taking the lead in the race towards finding an AIDS vaccine. On Friday the University announced that the first DNA based vaccine is currently being tested on HIV-positive patients. The vaccine is designed to delay or possibly stop the onset of AIDS in people infected with HIV. "As the first human trial of a DNA vaccine, this signal a new era in vaccine development and could revolutionize the way vaccines are produced and give, William Kelley, CEO of the University Medical Center and Health System said in a statement released to the press. The first patient in the study is a 34 year-old woman who is HIV positive. She has received her initial injection of the vaccine and is now undergoing tests as part of Phase I safety trial. Over the next year, 15 other patients will join in the study. And the patients will be placed in three groups of five, with each group taking a different dosage. The trial will last about one or two years. The brains behind the new technology is Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine David Weiner. Weiner and Apollo, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company in Malvern, Pennsylvania systematically designed these cassettes from dead strands of the HIV virus and viral proteins. The clinical trial is being conducted by Professor Ron MacGregor and Professor Stephen Gluckman, both professors of medicine and infectious disease. "The idea is to beef up the immune system against the virus and hopefully maintain [a] state of control and keep the virus infection silent," Weiner said in a September interview. Earlier studies conducted by Weiner with mice, rats, rabbits and non-human primates have demonstrated that DNA injection does indeed stimulate the immune system. But the researchers have not yet determined whether the treatment will prevent subsequent infection in HIV-positive subjects, he said. The vaccine contains HIV genes that will instruct the virus to produce two specific proteins within the patients' cells. The proteins will spark an immune response, causing the patient's bodies to produce additional antibodies and the white blood cells known as killer T cells. These so called killer T cells kill HIV infected cells. "While this study is for HIV, if the approach is safe and successful, it could change the way we think of vaccines," Weiner said in a press statement. "This approach appears to have promise not only as a preventive measure against infection, but also as a treatment for many varied diseases." Some other possible diseases the vaccine could attack include hepatitis, tuberculosis, certain cancers and autoimminue diseases. Weiner and his colleagues were given a $4.2 million grant form the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to develop the vaccine.


University goes all out to get a 'hot school' image

(06/22/95 9:00am)

If image is everything, then the University is on its way to having it all. "The sense is that Penn is a University whose time has come, and this sense is critical," University President Judith Rodin said at Thursday's External Affairs meeting with the University's Board of Trustees. And to insure that this does not change, the University has spent the last year searching for an Associate Vice President for Communications, a job Rodin described as "a unique position." She said the person selected will serve as a central spokesperson representing the University as well as serving as a key planner in the strategic policy of the University. This position has been vacant since last March, when Carol Farnsworth left the University upon being named Vice Chancellor for Communications at the University of Denver. Although the University has interviewed numerous applicants for the post, Rodin said they have yet to find the perfect candidate. Rodin said the position will be "a very welcome and needed addition to the University," although she said she believes the University's image has seen an improvement over the last year. "There is a real sense that Penn is a different place -- a place that is committed to good relationships with our neighbors both internally and externally," she said. And University Secretary Barbara Stevens agreed, saying that there has been a "solid increase in Penn's news coverage." Last year, the University ranked seventh in print news coverage of national universities, and fifth in broadcast coverage. University spokesperson Barbara Beck said this news coverage will increase dramatically with the 50th anniversary celebration of ENIAC, the world's first electronic computer, which will take place in February. So far, media ranging from Good Morning America to The New York Times have expressed a strong interest in the ENIAC celebration. "ENIAC is going to establish Penn as a leading University in the information age," Beck said. In order to further foster this relationship with the media, the University has to work on several areas -- including managing crises, communicating one message for all of the schools and increasing relevant media coverage to build public support for the University's mission, Stevens said. Vice President for Government, Community and Public Affairs Carol Scheman agreed that attention has to be paid to the way the University controls crises before they "blow up in the press," like with the Water Buffalo incident two years ago. Rodin suggested that the root of the problem is the lack of communication between the individual schools and departments. "We have potential crises brewing?because this is such a decentralized environment that things can go on without anybody knowing," she said. And with these changes, the University will be well on its way towards an improved public perception. Committee Chairperson and University Trustee Leonard Lauder said that as the University gets "hotter," the media will pick up more of its news. "It is easier to sell a hot lipstick than one nobody wants," he said, drawing from his experience in the cosmetic business. This analogy captured Rodin's attention, prompting her to ask him, "Should I think of myself as a hot lipstick?" But Lauder was quick to explain himself. "No, think of the University as one," he responded. "We can discuss the other later."


U. Chaplain honored; officials share goals with Trustees at stated meeting

(06/22/95 9:00am)

The University's Board of Trustees had their Stated Meeting Friday afternoon, capping two days of intense committee meetings. Trustees Chairperson Roy Vagelos started off the meeting by awarding University Chaplain Stanley Johnson with the E. Craig Sweeten Award for Distinguished Service, in honor of the 34 years he served at the University. Johnson is retiring at the end of the month. Then University President Judith Rodin addressed the Trustees, summing up the major accomplishments of the year. She was proud to announce that the University's balanced budget successfully reduced core administrative costs and that the budget experienced the lowest growth in unrestricted costs in over a decade. Rodin also told the Trustees about the completion of phase one of the Provost's Council on Undergraduate Education's 21st-century Penn Undergraduate Experience, as well as the safety initiatives that have been implemented under the Master Security Plan. Then Provost Stanley Chodorow gave an update on the status of the numerous positions the University is attempting to appoint. This was followed by a report from Admissions Dean Lee Stetson, who informed the Trustees that the University received a record number of applications this year and that it had the lowest admit rate ever at 33 percent. Medical School Dean William Kelley, who is also chief executive officer of the University Health System, said the recent merger of the University Health System and Presbyterian Medical Center and two nursing homes is "extremely important for the continued development of our teaching program." Former Trustee chairperson Alvin Shoemaker reported that the Campaign for Penn showed no sign of slowing down this year, making $175 million-- $2 million more than last year. He also announced that undergraduate financial aid is the key fund raising goal for the near future and informed the group that construction on the Perelman Quadrangle is scheduled to begin in December. And Bruce Mainwaring, Chairman of the University Museum's Board of Overseers, said the museum has embarked on a plan for a new wing. He added that renovations to Harrison Auditorium and the museum's entrance may be in store.


Calculations show U. gaining from New Era

(06/22/95 9:00am)

When the Foundation for New Era Philanthropy filed for bankruptcy last month, hundreds of organizations that invested with the group were facing a stark future. But the University may have been one of the lucky ones. According to recent calculations by Philadelphia Bankruptcy Trustee John Carroll III, the University may have actually ended up making $2.1 million from New Era. These figures are in direct contrast with the $1.5 million loss that University officials had originally projected. "The $1.5 million that we said earlier is the amount of money that the University currently has with New Era awaiting matching funds," University spokesperson Phyllis Holtzman explained. But she said the University cannot confirm the $2.1 million gain until it completes its own investigation, which is being conducted by Coopers & Lybrand. "This is what the trustee reported according to his calculations," Holtzman said. "But the University at this point can't really verify that for sure because we have our own audit going on and we really need to see how that all turns out." The firm will be investigating two major issues. "They are going to look at the University's procedures that led to this involvement with New Era," she said. "And they are also looking at this whole money issue to try figure out what the different funds represent." But even if Carroll's $2.1 million figure is accurate, the University may not have the money for long. Along with his bankruptcy figures, Carroll also released a set of rules, which might require organizations that made money from New Era to return some or all of their gains to help offset charities that were devastated. Holtzman said the University expects to return funds under the supervision of the courts. "But we don't know what amount or what time that would be," she said, adding that the University will not know its fate until the final accounting is complete. "We really expect that the court will be working on a fair formula and when all of that is complete, we will be returning some funds," Holtzman said. She added that she could not rule out the possibility that the University will take a loss as a result of investing with New Era. New Era, which is based in Radnor, Pa., with offices in London and Hong Kong, promoted itself as an innovative new charity capable of doubling nonprofit institutions' money by soliciting matching funds from a pool of anonymous wealthy donor, who supposedly relied on the charity to find worthy causes. Along with the University, hundreds of nonprofit organizations deposited their money with New Era, which said it would hold the funds for six months in brokerage accounts -- rather than in escrow -- and claimed to be investing it in certificates of deposit or treasury bills while finding matching donors. But John Bennett Jr., the charity's president, admitted to his staff last month that the anonymous donors did not really exist. Summer Pennsylvanian staff writer Josh Fineman contributed to this article.


Pa. House allocates $35.5 million in state funding to University

(06/22/95 9:00am)

The Pennsylvania House of Representatives allocated $35.5 million in state funding to the University Tuesday night when it passed the proposed budget for the 1995-1996 fiscal year. But unless the Senate approves the budget, the University might not see the money until the fall. After speaking with several senators on Wednesday morning,Vice President for Government, Community and Pubic Affairs Carol Scheman said she is confident that the Senate will pass the budget by the July 1 deadline. She said the lack of senate action has nothing to do with the University. Instead, she attributes it to a battle between democratic leadership and Pennsylvania Republican Governor Tom Ridge. The $35.5 million appropriation is the same amount that was allocated last year, but is a substantially lower amount than President Judith Rodin's request for $49.8 million. But Scheman said she was not surprised with the decision, explaining that the $49.8 million figure was what the University "could use," but that she did not really think the state would allocate that much money. "It's what we expected," she said. Scheman added that the University's highest priorities in the budget were increasing the money for the Veterinary School and lowering in-state tuition. She stressed the importance of the Vet School as being the only one of its kind in the state and the cutting-edge bio-medical research that is taking place at the school. The Vet School was allocated $20.7 million, which was only slightly lower than the $23 million that Scheman had hoped for. And $9.5 million was appropriated for General Instruction, while $4.28 million was given to the Medical School. The Dental clinic received just under $1 million. The major change between this year's allocations and last year's funding is that $6 million was taken from General Instructions and put towards the Vet School. Money appropriated by the state is earmarked for the University's health profession programs, specifically the Vet School and for maintenance of a need blind admissions policy. One of the amendments that was passed along with the budget includes the creation of a special committee to investigate spending practices by universities receiving direct state assistance. Representative John Lawless, the main sponsor of the resolution, grilled Rodin and other University officials at a budget hearing in the spring about the number of hours professors spend teaching and the money spent on travel and sabbaticals. But Scheman said she did not think that Lawless' attack had no effect on the amount of money allocated for the University.


U. Administration to address performing arts needs

(06/22/95 9:00am)

Perelman Quad not expected to solve space problems At Friday's Facilities and Campus Planning Committee Meeting with the Trustees, Rodin admitted that the plans for the Perelman Quadrangle will not accommodate all of the University's performing arts needs. "We have been pursuing alternatives," she said. "There is a need to spread out on campus." Rodin said officials are now rethinking the Annenberg Center as an option for providing students with more performing arts space. "The students have not had much opportunity to use the Annenberg Center because of the rates and rent structure," she said. But until recently, University officials have used the promise of performing arts space in the new student center as an appeasement to student complaints. In January, Provost Stanley Chodorow rejected a proposal submitted to him by representatives from the performing arts council and the undergraduate assembly, recommending that the site of the Eric 3 Campus Theater on 40th Street be converted into performing arts space. One of his main reasons at the time was that ample performing arts space would be provided in the Perelman Quadrangle. Rodin stressed that this is an issue the University is paying close attention to this summer. She said the goal is to make sure there is sufficient performing arts space for students, separate from what will be provided by the Perelman Quad. "By the end of the summer, we will have a very satisfactory plan and set of announcements for when the students come back," she promised.


Affirmative Action decision sparks University debate

(06/15/95 9:00am)

In a five to four ruling Monday, the Supreme Court cast doubt on the future of affirmative action programs by voting down a federal program which set aside a proportion of construction contracts for minority-owned firms. The ruling agitated earlier decisions made by the Supreme Court to uphold federal affirmative action programs, in particular a decision to uphold preferential treatment of minority businesses seeking broadcast licenses. As a result, the Supreme Court will now strictly scrutinize race-based federal programs to ensure that they are "narrowly tailored" to meet "compelling governmental interests." The decision does not spell the end to all affirmative action programs, however, as Political Science Professor Kerry Haynie said. "I don't think it is necessarily the end of affirmative action, he said, "[though] clearly there will be stricter scrutiny." Haynie said she was concerned not only by the Supreme Court ruling, but also by a decision of the Federal Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in October, which declared the University of Maryland's racially-based scholarships unconstitutional. She said there may have been some unnecessary special treatment given to minorities in the Maryland case, but added that "the misapplication of affirmative action is not new." With regard to Monday's ruling, Haynie said she agrees with the decision, adding that other forces such as differences in the quality of performance of the two companies may have been involved. She added that any court decision involving affirmative action should be made on a "case by case basis [and] should not necessarily apply to another program given comparable circumstances." Haynie was also concerned about how the case might be interpreted in the future. "If you use this one case to apply to all cases," he said, "for affirmative action that may be dangerous." "It may have a chilling impact," he added, "on the number of minorities in higher education ? such as students and faculty." Anita Jenious, the University's Executive Director of the Office of Affirmative Action, said that the case "has not done away with affirmative action completely." "It's a cause for concern," she said. "Everybody is concerned these days. "I'm convinced the University will always do the right thing," she added. "What anyone discussing Affirmative Action has to recognize," said Legal Studies and Real Estate Professor Kenneth Shropshire, "is that we don't need to eliminate any job that minorities with better qualifications are prevented from obtaining. "We still have to protect people from racism," he continued, adding that "some form of affirmative action is still needed." Eric Tienou, the chairperson of the First Amendment Task Force and member of the Undergraduate Assembly, was unsure about the consequences of the decision. "I can understand some of the the court's arguments, [but] I feel very cautious about the decision" the College senior said. "I would disagree with a program like that from an economic standpoint," he added, explaining that if the bids of two companies are the same, then factors such as diversity could be taken into account. "It's very disturbing if you see the court moving in one way," he said.


Campus movie theater to open for business

(06/15/95 9:00am)

It is lights, camera and action for the movie theater at 39th and Walnut streets. Cinemagic 3 at Penn is opening tomorrow with the blockbuster film Batman Forever on two of its three movie screens, according to Cinemagic Owner Andrew Sheppard. This theater is replacing the AMC Walnut Mall 3, which closed last November because it could not keep up with competition from larger theaters in the area. But Sheppard said Cinemagic will not have the same problem, because it will have a different priority than the AMC. "We will be getting pictures that students and faculty want to see," he said. "In the past that seemed like second or third or fourth priority." As examples of films the theater will be showing, Sheppard said he has reserved Pocahontas starting June 23, and Apollo 13 starting June 30. Sheppard added that extensive renovations were done to the theater during the year. Some of the changes include refurbishing the seats, installing an ultra-stereo sound system and adding television monitors throughout the lobby displaying upcoming previews. There will even be a monitor running 24 hours a day so people walking by can see it, he said. And the ticket box office now has a new indoor location so patrons do not have to purchase their tickets outside in the cold weather, Sheppard added. "Everything was basically ripped out," he said. "At least right now it looks like a brand new theater inside." Associate Treasurer Chris Mason estimated that these renovations cost Sheppard and the University somewhere between $75,000 and $100,000. Sheppard said there are a few differences between Cinemagic and other movie chains. There will be a security guard at the theater every night, Sheppard said. And unlike many other theaters, Cinemagic pops popcorn fresh for every show. He added that like the AMC, the theater will provide a discounted ticket price $4.50 for students. Tickets will cost six dollars for adults and four dollars for children and senior citizens. Mason said the University worked in conjunction with Cinemagic to open the parking lot at 40th and Walnut streets, "in attempt to help the other merchants on 40th Street towards Market." The lot, which opened up six weeks ago, provides parking for only two dollars, Mason said. "We are hoping that with the movie theater there, people will use that instead of parking on the street," he said. Last fall, the University negotiated with the Ritz Theater as a possible replacement for the AMC. But those negotiations fell through and Cinemagic became the company of choice. The Cinemagic theater was slated to open in March, but plans got delayed as a result of the fire at The Convenient Food Store, located at 39th and Walnut streets, in February. Sheppard described the smoke damage as "extensive," adding that "a lot of things needed to be wiped down." The Eric 3 Campus Theater on 40th Street also closed last August when its contract expired. Representatives from the Performing Arts Council and the Undergraduate Assembly submitted a proposal to officials in December, recommending that the site be converted into performing arts space. But Provost Stanley Chodorow rejected the idea in January, on the basis that it was too expensive and that ample performing arts space would be provided in the Perelman Quadrangle. And UA member Eric Tienou said earlier this week that "everything is really up in the air and pending discussions about the Perelman Quad." "Even PAC's priority is the Perelman Quad and this theater is secondary," the College senior said. Tienou added that he is still looking to continue discussions about using the theater for performing arts space.


Trustees on campus for meeting

(06/15/95 9:00am)

The University's BoBarbara Stion, the character of a Penn education and the organizational context within a Penn education takes place," she said. She added that this discussion is going to be based on the Provost's Committee on Undergraduate Education report which was issued earlier this spring. Following this meeting, there will be a luncheon for faculty and students with the trustees, she said. At lunch there will be a presentation by William Kissick, the Chair of this year's faculty senate, on "Medicine's Dilemmas: Infinite Needs versus Finite Resources." Stevens added that the Budget and Finance Committee is going to acting on the University and the Health System Budget for the upcoming fiscal year, as well as their capital budgets. And the External Affairs Committee will deal with "the ENIAC celebration and the opportunity this provides Penn to be recognized as a leader in technology going into the 21st Century." The Facilities and Campus Planning Committee are going to be discussing the Perelman Quadrangle. Stevens added that there will be a briefing on the Biological Research Building, the Institute for Advanced Science and Cevens, the trustees will meet with Provost Stanley Chodorow and the undergraduate deans to "talk about the 21st Century Undergraduate Experience." "They will really focus on the goals a Penard of Trustees are on campus for their stated meeting. According to University Secretary n educatharles Addams Hall. The Internationalization Committee is going to hear a report on the first annual Provost Conference on Information Education and Research, followed by the priorities and goals for international education at the University, she said. And tonight there will be a dinner and reception held in honor of University alumnus Walter Annenberg and his wife and the inauguration of the Annenberg Center for Public Policy at the University.


Renovations vause Dining Services; PennCard offices to change location

(06/15/95 9:00am)

After seven years at 3401 Walnut Street, the offices of the University's Hospitality Services moved to the second floor of the 40th Street shopping mall last week. Hospitality Services -- which includes the University's Dining Service, PennCard offices, as well as the catering and vending services -- changed location to accommodate renovations to College Hall. The renovations also made it necessary for President Judith Rodin to move her office upstairs to the third floor of College Hall, where the History Department of the College of Arts and Sciences is currently located. The History Department will take over the offices at 3401 Walnut. "We're an auxiliary enterprise, moving at the behest of the University," said Don Jacobs, the Executive Director of Hospitality Services. But he added that he was not dissatisfied with the move, and that the new location will contain approximately the same amount of office space as the 3401 location. The new offices, situated directly above the Burger King Restaurant at the corner of 40th and Walnut, will cost Hospitality Services about $50,000 less rent a year. And this move helped students, too, because the savings was a major factor in the decision to keep the cost of next year's meal contracts at the same level as this year. "The rent is considerably cheaper, and part of my job description is to not cost the University a nickel," said Jacobs, whose operation is financially independent of the University. But unlike the 3401 location, which would have cost about $200,000 a year in rent, Hospitality Services will have to pay for utilities at the new location, Jacobs said. Jacobs said that the new location will probably have both a positive and negative effect on the number of students who will sign up for meal plans. "We're farther from the center of campus, but we're also closer to a lot more of the dorms," Jacobs said. He added that the Dining Service offices of almost all the other Ivy League schools are on the outskirts of campus. Dining Services Director Bill Canney said he hoped the new location would encourage more students living off-campus to sign a meal contract. "When we moved seven years ago from 1920 Commons to 3401 Walnut, I thought it might hurt us, but in fact the number of students on meal plan went up." said Canney. "Hopefully this move will have the same effect." However, Jacobs said he was surprised by the different atmosphere surrounding the new location at 40th and Walnut. "I was shocked at first by the seediness of the area," said Jacobs. "But I think having more offices and people here will make the area safer." This move is the fourth for Dining Services since 1975, and neither Canney nor Jacobs knew how permanent their new location would be. "How long will we stay -- it doesn't enter my thoughts, nor should it," Jacobs said.


Solar car team fuels up for race

(06/15/95 9:00am)

When the University solar car team heads out on Tuesday for Indianapolis, they hope to be basking in the sun for the next few weeks. If the team qualifies for Sunrayce 95 -- a 1,200 mile trek from Indianapolis to Golden, Colorado -- they will be one of 40 teams competing in a race designed solely for solar-powered cars designed and constructed by students. The race to Golden will take nine days, with the competition culminating on June 29 with a celebration. Last year the team competed in a considerably shorter race -- the Tour De Sol -- which went from New York to Philadelphia. The team finished third in the competition. Engineering sophomore Aaron Vernon said the team believes it has a decent shot this year, possibly finishing in the top 20. But the solar car, aptly named the Liberty Belle, will be facing some stiff competition from local rival Drexel and also former 1990 and 1993 national champion University of Michigan. Vernon attributed Michigan's racing prowess to the fact that Michigan has a $1.5 million budget, due in large part to corporate sponsorship from Detroit automakers. The University's solar car team has a budget of approximately $80,000, and Vernon estimated that the organization has spent $125,000 in the last two years. One difference that separate the University's team from other competitors is that the project is almost completely run by students, according to Engineering junior Ryan Crowell, who has been working on the car's electrical system. The team is so optimistic about this summer's race because some changes have been made on the solar car in the last year, he said. There has been a doubling of the solar cell surface area, a redesign of the rear wheels and suspension and the vehicle's electrical system is being upgraded from 100 to 200 volts. This change in electrical power should increase the speed and efficiency of the car, Crowell added. Another technological advance for the team is a state-of-the-art data acquisition system, which will be used in the chase car to collect 16 different types of data, ranging from the temperature of the car to how long the battery will last. In recent practice runs, the car has gone slightly faster than 40 m.ph., and Crowell said he expects the average speed during the race to be about 45 m.p.h. Although the solar car team is composed of 40 members, only 10 will actually be competing in the race. The 10 were chosen based on who put the most time into the project, Crowell said. He added that the team has recently been "burning the midnight oil," working on the car from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. for the last two week, putting on the finishing touches before race day. "We're the underdog, the cinderella story," Crowell said. "But we like it that way." The competition is not over when the teams finally reach Golden on June 29. The next day is Pike's Peak Challenge, in which the cars try to race up Pike's Peak. But Pike's Peak is not the last challenge of the summer, according to Vernon. In July the team plans to go to Pocono Raceway to attempt to break the world record for speed by a solar car of 83 m.p.h "We thought we could call Guinness and get him out here and see what this baby can do," Vernon said. In addition to receiving a big trophy, the top three finishers in Sunrayce 95 win an all expense paid trip to Australia, courtesy of General Motors, to compete in the 1996 World Solar Car Challenge. Sunrayce 95 is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, in an effort to promote solar energy as an alternative to the consumption of fossil fuels and to reduce pollution.


Preate to resign as Attorney General

(06/15/95 9:00am)

Pennsylvania Attorney General Ernie Preate, a University alumnus, agreed to plead guilty to mail fraud and resign from office Tuesday. The attorney general, a 1965 graduate of the University Law School and a 1962 graduate of the Wharton School, could go to jail for as long as five years and be fined as much as $250,000 for the single federal charge. On Tuesday Preate told U.S. Middle District Court Judge Sylvia Rambo that he was pleading guilty. Preate turned control of the Attorney General's Office to top deputy Walter Cohen, and he will officially resign June 23. U.S. Attorney David Barasch said Tuesday that Preate engaged in "a decade-long scheme of repeated violations of state campaign finance law in a pattern of fraud, concealment and deception." Preate, a former president of the Newman Council at the University, had been under investigation for the last five years concerning his campaign finances. He solicited cash contributions for his campaign from illegal video poker operators and hid the funds from election officials, prosecutors said in court papers. The agreement, which was signed last week, says Preate filed false and misleading documents to conceal the cash donations. Throughout the investigation, Preate continually denied any wrongdoing and maintained that he would be vindicated by the federal probe. The investigation found that poker operators contributed about $40,000 to Preate's campaign, half of that in cash donations above the legal limit of $100, to buy relaxed enforcement of gambling laws by the state, prosecutors said in court documents. Preate was district attorney of Lackawanna County from 1977 to 1989 and has been attorney general since 1989. He unsuccessfully sought the Republican nomination for governor last year. Pennsylvania state law requires the governor to nominate a replacement for the vacancy in the attorney general's office. The replacement will serve the remaining 1 1/2 years of Preate's term. The Associated Press contributed to this Article.


Recent grad convicted; alleges mistreatment

(06/15/95 9:00am)

Recent University graduate and Daily Pennsylvanian columnist Ian Blake was convicted of disorderly conduct at a court hearing at the Philadelphia Police Southwest Detective's station. But Blake contends that he was mistreated by the police officer who arrested him and he plans to mount an appeal. In court, in front of Judge Robert Blasi, Officer David Carroll testified that on May 2 at about 2:50 p.m. he was called to Van Pelt Library to respond to a complaint that a woman's wallet had been stolen. Carroll said the woman believed that Blake was the individual who took the wallet. Carroll explained that he approached Blake and asked to speak with him, but Blake raised his voice and spoke "very nasty" to the officer. Carroll also said that Blake pushed him into the library office. But Blake tells a different story. Blake claims that Carroll told him to go into the stacks, but Blake said he was unwilling because of Carroll's "reputation." "I was very reluctant to go into the stacks with Officer Carroll because of his reputation," Blake said Tuesday. Blake added that Carroll pulled him into the stacks and shoved him 3 or 4 times and told Blake that he was under arrest. He also said in court that he was arrested under false pretense, because a woman, who had been sitting next to him at a computer lab in Van Pelt, claimed he had stolen some items out of her wallet. University Police Commissioner John Kuprevich said he couln't comment on the case. University Police Chief George Clisby was unavailable for comment.


Summer internships keep students busy

(06/15/95 9:00am)

and Jorie Green More students than ever are spending their summers gaining work experience with internships, according to Career Planning and Placement Service counselor Laura Praglin. Communications and marketing career opportunities in particular have expanded, she added. "Given the job market, employers are looking for some practical job experience before a person graduates," Praglin said. "It shows that a person is responsible, that they're ready to hit the ground running." Praglin also reported that last year, 600 of 625 surveyed University students held internships, and 75 percent received salaries of over $500 a month for their work. But the size of the paycheck may not be all that important in the long run. Praglin said unpaid or low-paying internships still contain one essential benefit -- connections. "An unpaid internship can often lead to something that does pay," she said. "These people that you are working for are the people who can write you great recommendations." But students working in the Philadelphia area said there are short term benefits to internships as well -- no homework. Becoming part of the "real world," may mean more time indoors and less freedom with dress. But it also means stress-free evenings filled with sit-com re-runs, long telephone conversations and in some cases, wild nights out on the town. "A lot of people get to roam the city and go out more than during the year," said Engineering senior Marsha Chan Wai Hong, who interns in the Marketing Department. "When I go out drinking, I wake up with a hangover [and go to work]." Edinburgh University exchange student Andrew Lin, who also has an internship on campus, has discovered a whole new perspective to Bennett Hall while conducting research for English Professor Rita Barnard. Instead of the classrooms, Lin said he finds himself spending much of his time in the English department office in 119 Bennett Hall -- photocopying. But not all interns in Philadelphia have managed to escape textbooks for the summer. Along with a research internship and a part time job at the Biomedical Library, Engineering junior Gabriela Gonzalez is also taking Mathematics 312. She said all of her summer activities are keeping her very busy. "I have free time when I sleep," she said.


U. sponsors international 'virtual conference'

(06/08/95 9:00am)

Scientist, researchers, company executives and military officials from around the world are meeting throughout the month of June to discuss solid electrolytes. But thanks to School of Engineering and Applied Science Dean Gregory Farrington transportation to the conference is free. That is because the conference is being conducted via the information superhighway from the University. And the "virtual conference" is one of the first of its kind, according to Associate Director of Computing and Educational Technology Services Helen Anderson. Farrington designed the entire worldwide internet forum and a program called Adobe Acrobat allows the magic to happen. Two hundred scientists throughout the world began meeting Monday over the World Wide Web to exchange ideas about solid electrolytes, the material batteries are made from. In this "virtual conference," authors from around the world have electronically submitted papers on the topic. Forty-five papers can be accessed on the Web for those who are part of the conference. Some of the countries participating include Sweden, India, Australia, Great Britain, Japan, Denmark, Brazil, Germany, and Spain. And Anderson said language is not a communication barrier, even though all the articles are written in English. She added that English has become the language of international science because most of the scientific journals are published in English. The purpose of the internet meeting is twofold, Anderson said, serving both scientific needs and experimenting with the new information technology. Batteries are a "hot topic" because of electric cars and the push to make more powerful, longer-lasting batteries, she explained. "Maybe there is a paper in their that revolutionizes batteries," Anderson said. From the Universities viewpoint, the real benefit of the "virtual conference" is the chance to experiment with new technology, cutting edge tools that might be the wave of future. "We have never tried to exchange information in this way before," Anderson said. Anderson said the conference not only attracts scientists and university researches, but military officials and large corporations like Dow Chemical. "It's of great interest to all kinds of people," she said. The first few days of the meeting have encountered some glitches, Anderson said, adding that this is to be expected in the initial stages of most new endeavors. After the month-long experiment concludes, Elsevier, a Netherlands based company is going to publish the papers.


Jamieson on national panel for undergraduate education

(06/08/95 9:00am)

Annenberg School for Communication Dean Kathleen Hall Jamieson will be serving on a national panel evaluating undergraduate education at research universities. Jamieson said the panel is going to examine alternative ways to educate undergraduates in higher education. She added that it was selected to represent both public and private institutions. "It's an attempt to step back from the entire process and take a look at where we have been and where we are going," she added. The panel also contains professors from the University of California at Berkeley, University of Chicago, State University of New York at Stony Brook, University of Virginia and Yale University. The senior vice president from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting is also on the panel. The idea for this panel originated from Stony Brook President Shirley Kenny. It is also being supported by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The panel is slated to issue a report next spring. Jamieson said it expects to set up at least three meetings, the first of which is expected to take place this summer. Provost Stanley Chodorow said he thinks it is great that Jamieson has been chosen to serve on this committee. And University Spokesperson Barbara Beck said that Jamieson is "an excellent choice" for the panel. "She is a committed academic who year after year after year inspires undergraduates through her teaching and research," she said. "Dean Jamieson is yet another example of Penn's academic excellence." Beck added that many universities doing similar analysis of undergraduate education, including the University. "Judith Rodin is one of a few doing something about it. She has made it one of her goals as the President of the University of Pennsylvania," she said. "Today Penn offers a first rate undergraduate education," she added. "It is more competitive and more highly regarded as an undergraduate school than ever before. "However as good as penn is, it can be better," Beck added. "And we'll lead the way for undergraduate education for the 21st century."


John Glick named ASCO president

(06/08/95 9:00am)

University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center Director John Glick was recently named president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology during the society's annual meeting in Los Angeles, California. Glick is one of the country's leading cancer specialists, and has been involved in clinical-trials research related to breast cancer, Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, for more than two decades. Glick, who is included in "The Best Doctors of America," a listing of the nation's top medical specialists, is currently a professor of medicine. Glick effectively became President of ASCO on May 23. He said he hopes to accomplish several goals, including increasing funding for clinical research, improving patient/physician communication and supporting translational research. He added that he also hopes to monitor the impact of the changing healthcare environment on clinical practice and patient care. "My commitment to these issues is based on their impact to the community at large and, most importantly, to individual cancer patients and their families," Glick said. "We need to carefully analyze how healthcare reform is affecting both patient care and access to innovative cancer clinical trials," he added. Glick has been a member of numerous editorial boards, including the Journal of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Research. In addition, he is presently a member of the editorial board of Breast Diseases and the advisory board of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology. He has served as chairman of the Subspecialty Board on Medical Oncology of the American board of Internal Medicine. The ASCO is the largest association of cancer researchers and clinicians in the United States. Founded in 1964, the society currently has a membership of more than 9,600. The University Cancer Center is one of only twenty-seven centers designated for comprehensive cancer treatment by the National Cancer Institute. The Associated Press contributed to this article.


First Summerfest event kicks off today

(06/08/95 9:00am)

Looking for something new and exciting to do today? Take a walk down to Houston Hall Plaza -- the area between Houston and College Halls -- and take part in Summerfest 1995 between noon and two p.m. There will be vendors selling food and a radio station playing music. And, of course, there will be free ice cream for everyone. The Office of University Life and the College of General Studies are co-sponsoring the event. Acting Vice Provost for University Life Valarie Swain-Cade McCoullum said the departments decided there was a need for this type of event because there are not many structured activities over the summer. "It's really important for us to come together as a nurturing community all year long," she said. "And I think new traditions to that end in the summer are terrific." She added that she believes this is the first time an event like this is being held in the summer. "It should be fun, and I hope a lot of folks come," McCoullum said. And Associate CGS Director Marion Bell said this event is something the two departments have been thinking about for a long time. "We thought we would like to do something to liven things up on campus for students over the summer," she said. If the weather is not good, the event will be held in Houston Hall's Bodek Lounge, Bell added. Both Bell and McCoullum stressed that they hope this event attracts not only students, but also faculty, administrators and community members. Bell said this is the first of four events the two departments are running. The next one is tentatively set for June 22, and there are two dates set aside during the second summer session. The future events will not be exactly like today's, she added. "There may be live music next time," Bell said. And McCoullum said the departments are planning a free summer film series at the Annenberg School. One film will be shown every Thursday evening at 6:30 p.m. starting on July 6 and running until August 10. The series, which is being called "The City on Screen: Free Films at Penn," is currently scheduled to include the films Blade Runner, Manhattan, The Blues Brothers, Chinatown, Brazil and Philadelphia. All of movies will deal with "the intricacies and intrigues of urban life," according to CGS Publicity and External Affairs Coordinator Luise Moskowitz. And refreshments will be available at all screenings.


Tricia Phaup to leave University for new position

(06/08/95 9:00am)

Director of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs Tricia Phaup announced Tuesday that she is leaving the University. Phaup said she is leaving in order to pursue another job offer. She will be working in a private hospital, primarily with geriatric patients. "I am totally switching fields so it will bring about a lot of new opportunities for me and push me in directions I have not been pushed in before," she said. Acting Vice Provost for University Life Valarie Swain-Cade McCoullum said this new position will allow Phaup to use more of her talents. "She is trained in a lot of different areas, but one of her areas of expertise is in clinical psychotherapy," she said. "This gives her a wonderful opportunity to do work that is so important to her." Phaup said it is going to be difficult for her to leave the University. "I have been here for seven years now, and I have made a lot of great friends," she said. She added that she has enjoyed watching the Greek System grow and prosper. She estimated that the Greek community has grown by at least 15 percent during her tenure at the University. Phaup has had to deal with many controversial issues during her time here, including the University's alcohol policy. She reported that during her time here, student accountability in the system has grown. And McCoullum said Phaup has done a "fantastic job" dealing with the problems that came up. "During my term as acting VPUL, we have had a number of issues that students and alumni and Tricia have moved through very gracefully," she said. Phaup said the thing she will miss the most about her job at the University is working with the students. But she added that she is confident she is leaving the community in able hands. "[IFC President David Treat and Panhel President Lissette Calderon] have a lot of goals and directions and I know they will do a wonderful job moving the system forward," she said. Phaup served as the principal advisor to the BiCultural InterGreek Council, the InterFraternity Council and the Panhellenic Council. She also worked actively with the members of the Greek Alumni Council, as well as with many national chapters. "Her responsibilities range from helping to sponsor different on-campus events to working through any of the issues and concerns that come up as part of the work with the different student groups," McCoullum said. She added that Phaup always informed the University about the important community service work that the fraternities and sororities take part in. "She is one of the biggest cheerleaders in the world for the work the fraternities and sororities do in the community," McCoullum said. While Phaup's official last day of work is June 30, her last day at the University will be June 16. She said she is taking some vacation time until the end of the month. A replacement has not been chosen yet, but McCoullum said she will be working with Phaup, as well as students from the Big C, the IFC and Panhel to "make sure that we continue to provide exemplary support to the units." "But there is no one on earth like Tricia," she said. "She is absolutely fabulous. I am very very happy for her, but I am personally desolate that she is leaving." McCoullum added that she has been "trying everything" to talk Phaup out of leaving the University. "I have offered her ice cream, a constant supply of Philadelphia pretzels and chocolate chip cookies, but to no avail," she said. McCoullum added that Phaup will not be easy to replace. "She works 24 hours a day, seven days a week," she said. "I don't think there is anyone better at that job in the country than Tricia." McCoullum promised there would definitely be a new person in place by the fall.