Search Results


Below are your search results. You can also try a Basic Search.




Getting around in U. City gets easier

(02/23/00 10:00am)

This spring, new signs will help both pedestrians and drivers as they pass through the city. The University City District sponsored the plan. Helpful signs designed to direct University City visitors to local attractions will be coming to street corners all over the area beginning this spring. "There's a lot of great institutions here in University City," said Eric Goldstein, the University City District's director of capitol projects. "We wanted this mapping system in place to help people find their way around this great neighborhood." The two types of maps have distinctly different purposes -- Walk Philadelphia is designed to help pedestrians, and Direction Philadelphia is for the drivers navigating West Philadelphia's streets. The Walk Philadelphia signs will be on every intersection from the Schuylkill River westward to 40th Street, north to Market Street and south to Woodland Avenue. The Direction Philadelphia signs will be placed strategically in the middle of every block in the same locations. Included on the Walk Philadelphia signs will be important landmarks such as 30th Street Station, Drexel University, Penn, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. "A system of directional signage was one of our primary goals," UCD Executive Director Paul Steinke said. "Our plan was to make the neighborhood more accessible and user-friendly to those who come to University City." The initiative is one of the District's latest efforts to both beautify University City and attract residents from throughout the region to the area. The maps aiming to help visitors on foot find their way around University City employ a unique method called "heads-up mapping." Instead of the top of the map always reading "North," these new maps always face the same direction that the pedestrian faces. Although this technique dates back to 1675, Philadelphia designer Joel Katz perfected the system for use in Center City's maps. He stressed that this particular "heads-up" system really helps people navigate their way around an urban setting. "Maps and directions are no good if you don't know where you are," Katz said. "Orientation is just as important as direction." In addition to the maps, there will also be signs that read "University City," welcoming visitors who drive into the neighborhood. The Walk Philadelphia and Direction Philadelphia signs are based on maps that began sprouting up in Center City in 1997, as a way to highlight various tourist districts. And the UCD has eagerly followed the Center City District's example, obtaining funding for the signage system from the Philadelphia Department of Streets. Currently, there are 490 Walk and Direction Philadelphia signs in Center City. According to CCD Public Spaces Manager Darren Fava, the program's extension into West Philadelphia really makes this a one-of-a-kind endeavor. "This is one of the most comprehensive systems of its kind in the country," Fava said. Although the City of Philadelphia is funding the maps' creation, UCD still must appeal to their Board of Executives to grant maintenance funding to keep them graffiti-free. "We're hoping that all the stakeholders will all see the value and support of our maintenance efforts," Goldstein said.


Jumps come naturally to Tuan Wreh

(02/23/00 10:00am)

The men's track sophomore is thriving in just his fourth year of organized competition. Penn triple and long jumper Tuan Wreh may have been introduced to track and field relatively late in his life, but you wouldn't know it to watch the sophomore leap. Wreh was a standout basketball player for Richard Montgomery High School in Rockville, Md., for three seasons before he finally submitted to constant urging by his friends to try out for track. Apparently, watching a 5'9" youngster dunk was enough to convince Wreh's schoolmates that he had a gift that could perhaps be better exhibited elsewhere. When he stepped onto the track in his junior year, Wreh discovered his true calling in sports and put aside his first athletic love. The basketball team's damaging loss was the track squad's immeasurable gain. To say that the newcomer made his presence felt in just those two short seasons would be like saying George Washington had a slight hand in winning the Revolution. Right from the start, Wreh's talent was obvious, but that did not cause him to slack off in his quest to improve. Wreh points out that a solid work ethic is essential to any competitor. "I try to take practice intensely and take each practice as if it's a mini-meet," he said. He won the team's "Hardest Worker Award" in his junior season, but that was a mere prelude to his senior campaign. In the spring of 1998, Wreh was recognized as the team MVP and placed second in the nation in the triple jump, the event he considers to be his stronger suit. From there, it was obvious that Wreh would figure to be an integral part of whatever college team he chose. He selected Penn since it offered the perfect combination of academics and a successful track program. In his freshman season at Penn, Wreh continued improving as he qualified for IC4As indoors in both the triple and long jump, a feat he has already duplicated this year. Yet, with all this success, the sophomore knows he has to keep getting better and claims that even though he's by no means displeased with his development, he is still not yet satisfied. "I know I have a lot more potential than what I've realized," he said. That said, Wreh's sensational accomplishments in such a short time have impressed all those around him, including Penn assistant coach Tim Beach. "He knows how to do it, but it's fresh to him," said Beach, who indicated that even greater performances can be expected in the future as the sophomore gains more experience. Wreh seems to agree with that diagnosis. "Every year I've gotten better. Every meet I feel like I'm getting better," he said. Now, heading into this weekend's Heptagonal Championships at Dartmouth, Wreh feels confident about both his personal prospects as well as about those of his team overall. "I'm happy with what the team's done," he said. "We've all put in a great amount of effort." The native of suburban Washington, D.C., confirms that the Quakers have shaken their "mid-season blues" and now appear to have the intensity they have strived for all year long. "We're really excited and really focused right now," he added. Heps is indisputably the most significant team meet of the season, but for a few Penn track athletes -- including Wreh -- an equally important individual competition will follow on the subsequent weekend -- IC4As. And there is also a chance that Wreh might even qualify for Nationals at Arkansas the week after that. He ranks fifth on Penn's all-time triple jump list and Beach is cautiously optimistic that Wreh might gain a chance to perform on indoor track's most prestigious stage. Tuan Wreh may have accomplished a lot in his first three years participating in organized track, but his future is almost certain to be brighter than his past.


Notebook: W. Hoops calls out for support from alumni

(02/23/00 10:00am)

The Quakers spent Monday on the phones getting alums to attend Saturday's game. The Penn women's basketball team had its customary day off on Monday to follow a busy weekend of Ivy League games. The Quakers still got together, though. Instead of working the ball around the court, they were working the phones. They called alumni -- some of whom were former players -- asking for contributions to the program and inviting them to a reception at the Palestra preceding this Saturday's game against Harvard. At least one of the Quakers found that her conversations with alums were reward enough. "One lady from the Class of '43 was really excited," freshman forward Jennifer Jones said. "Talking about how she used to play six-on-six, halfcourt [basketball] back in the day." On Julie Epton's list was a former Quaker whose name has been mentioned in these pages quite a bit recently. The sophomore called Kirsten Brendel, whose career points record was broken last Friday by junior forward Diana Caramanico. "[The list] said she worked overseas in Germany or something, but I just called her home address somewhere in Jersey," Epton said. "I just left a message. I didn't say anything about Di breaking her record." · Calling wasn't the only thing the Quakers were doing Monday. Even though they had a day off from practice, the members of the team met and discussed the events of the past weekend, which left the Quakers tied with Harvard for second place in the league at 7-2 -- one game behind Dartmouth (8-1). "We watched the Columbia tape, which was really frustrating. It's terrible when you lose to someone you're better than." Epton said of Saturday's 70-67 loss. "I definitely think we're the better team," Jones said. "We took this team for granted, and they came to play." The Quakers play two games this weekend that could make or break their chances for the team's first-ever Ivy League title. Penn coach Kelly Greenberg talked to her players about the weekend's importance. "We had a short discussion about things that [Greenberg] thinks are important," Epton said. "[She talked] about the things that make a championship team and what it takes to become one." One of those things is avoiding letdowns on those all-important Ivy League Saturday nights. "The past two weeks, we've lost our Saturday games," Epton said. "So we talked about 'building up' and not forgetting about the Saturday game after a big Friday night win." · The Quakers were plastered by league-leading Dartmouth back on February 12, one night after taking sole possession of first place by beating a then-undefeated Harvard team. But the Quakers still control their own destiny and, with wins over Dartmouth on Friday and Harvard on Saturday, can vault back into first place. "We still feel like we can win this thing," Epton said. · The Red and Blue got a little extra campus media exposure last night as tri-captains Diana Caramanico and Mandy West, along with Greenberg, appeared on the UTV13 show Out of Bounds, co-hosted by Penn men's basketball player Michael Jordan and UTV sportscaster Adam Thomas. Last night's episode was a tamer, more subdued incarnation of the normally raucous show, as Greenberg provided a little "adult supervision." "It was definitely more subdued than usual," Epton said. "They didn't use as much interesting language. They definitely toned it down because Coach was there." Epton thought that, despite some of the antics of the show's regulars, it will help to increase the support for the Quakers. "It would be great to have more fans for the games this weekend," she said. "We have fans, but it would be nice if it were a little more like at Harvard and Dartmouth, where they packed them in." · West -- despite playing with major back pain last weekend -- has been the Quakers' leading scorer for the last three games, with totals of 28, 23 and 18 points. "That's just her leadership," Jones said of her teammate's gutty performances. "She leads by her scoring and by example. She's really tough, despite her injuries."


Plans fall apart for new video store near Penn

(02/22/00 10:00am)

TLA Video wants to focus on its online ventures, rather than video rental. With its online sales making old-fashioned retail video rental look obsolete, TLA Video has decided opening a store in a long-vacant space near 40th and Walnut streets as the University had previously hoped, according to Penn officials. The Philadelphia-based TLA had been in talks with the University since September, when both parties showed an interest in filling the area near 40th Street that will soon showcase Robert Redford's Sundance Cinemas complex and other new retail and entertainment options intended to make the location a destination spot for Philadelphians. "It does not look like the TLA deal will move forward," said John Greenwood, a top official at the University's real estate company. TLA would have operated out of the vacant store adjacent to the Eat at Joe's diner on the 3900 block of Walnut Street. Greenwood said TLA, which runs six retail stores and is now moving toward greater involvement with Internet sales, will not be creating new retail locations anywhere in the near future. "While we feel badly, we still think that the location is terrific," he said, adding that Penn is currently evaluating other music and video retail options for the site. Greenwood noted the difficulty of finding "terrific, eclectic" options like TLA, saying that the University had been contacting the larger Blockbuster video chain in recent years until negotiations began with TLA. Students have repeatedly expressed interest in having more video rental options available on campus. According to an Undergraduate Assembly-sponsored survey conducted in December 1998, 53 percent of 470 students polled expressed an interest in having a late-night video store. UA Chairman Michael Silver made bringing a late-night video store to campus a top UA priority last semester. "It's still, in my mind, a no-brainer that we need a viable video store on campus," the College senior said. TLA struggled with its decision not to open on campus, according to company officials. "We agonized about it," TLA co-owner Eric Moore said, noting that Penn had made a "sweet offer." "It was painful to turn down," he added. Considering time and money, the retail venture would not have made financial sense, according to Moore. TLA's online sales have more than quintupled since last year. This month, the company will likely bring in about $170,000 in gross Internet sales, compared to $30,000 last year. December holiday sales took in $230,000, according to Moore, who predicts that the online business will continue to grow quickly. TLA President Ray Murray said the future of home video is moving in a different direction from video rental. "I think video stores in 10 years won't exist," Murray said yesterday, adding that movie-watchers will eventually view films from the comfort of their home computers. Tom Lussenhop, the University's top real estate official, said that TLA's online focus will shape the type of retail the University seeks in the future. "I sense a market opportunity? for an entrepreneur that takes advantage of the Web," he said. Lussenhop added that he wants a University-community dialogue on how to meet the demand for high-quality video rental, while at the same time staying consistent with technological change. Bringing a late-night video store to campus was a recommendation made last spring by Provost Robert Barchi's Working Group on Alcohol Abuse as a way to provide more non-alcoholic activity options on campus. The only video store currently on campus, the Video Library on the 4000 block of Locust Street, closes at 10 p.m. on weeknights and Saturdays.


Changes today to Penn InTouch

(02/22/00 10:00am)

In the future, voting will take place using he updated Penn InTouch. Technological advances are making it easier and easier for Penn students to rock the vote. Online voting began last spring on the Web site of the Nominations and Elections Committee. But this semester, voting will be available on a platform that everyone knows well -- Penn InTouch. The program, created by the NEC and the Information Systems and Computing office, will be uploaded today, along with Advisor-In-Touch, a component designed to make students' academic records more accessible to them. The NEC predicts that, with the new system, more students will vote in Penn elections this spring than in previous years. "By making it easier to vote, students will exercise [their vote] in student politics" said NEC Vice Chairwoman of Elections Teresa Lee, a Wharton and Engineering junior. "Students [can] really care about who gets elected." When students log on to Penn InTouch, they will see a link to elections on the sidebar. This link will take them straight to the appropriate ballots for their class year and school. Elections this spring will overlap with fall pre-registration, Lee said, so more students than usual may vote because they will visit Penn InTouch to register for classes. The idea for Penn InTouch voting was originally devised by College senior and NEC Chairwoman Christine Naselaris last summer after she found problems with the elections through the NEC's Web site. After the proposal received approval last fall, Lee headed up the project, working closely with members of ISC. According to NEC members, the previous online system on the dolphin-server Web site had numerous problems, making it difficult for students to vote online. Students with advanced standing due to Advanced Placement credits or a heavy course load could not receive an online ballot. Also, students were required to log in using their PennNet ID and password, which many students could not easily recall. According to Lee, both of these problems have been solved with the new platform. Penn InTouch will determine students' class standings by their expected graduation date, not by the number of credits they have, allowing all students to have access to an online ballot. "Students know the system -- it's really accessible," Lee said. Unfortunately, she added, the problem of dual-degree candidates who are registered in more than one school has not yet been solved. As with the previous system, these students will receive a ballot only for their primary school. ISC Technical Director Jim Choate said the make-up of the elections component has purposely been generically designed so that other student organizations can use the program to hold votes in the future. "I would hope that it would increase participation," Choate added. According to Choate, the elections component of Penn InTouch will be uploaded today, but will not be accessible until elections begin on March 29. He added that there were no immediate security concerns over the new elections system. The NEC will hold its annual "Get Out the Vote" campaign during elections week, encouraging students to vote using the new online system.


From the kitchen to your room

(02/22/00 10:00am)

Two Wharton freshmen started an in-room service offering Hill residents bacon, eggs and toast. Every weekday morning, Adam Chewning and Andrew Nimmer are busy cracking eggs and frying bacon while most Penn students are still sprawled in their beds. They're too busy to make breakfast for themselves, however. So instead, the two Wharton freshmen spend their mornings working on a fledgling business enterprise that's more a labor of love than a get-rich-quick scheme, a benevolent project that brings food to other freshmen -- and some local popularity to them in return. In fact, Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Chewning and Nimmer bring both warm and cold breakfasts to the doors of their fellow Hill College House residents. Named "Breakfast Smiles," the service began on January 31. Chewning and Nimmer already have 14 meal contracts, all from their neighbors in Hill. "It's always a good option to have," said loyal client Yeun Tong Yeung, a College freshman. "There are sometimes you just can't make it to the dining hall, so it's nice when they come to deliver you a meal." "I never ate breakfast before the service. It's convenient because I get a meal before the day starts," said Wharton freshman Justin Nomi, another one of the clients. The two students met in Homestead High School in Wisconsin. Even after Chewning, known affectionately as "Chewy" to his friends, moved to Virginia, the two maintained their friendship. Coincidentally, they both came to Penn and wound up living in the same college house. Chewning and Nimmer were inspired to start their breakfast service after they noticed how inconvenient it can be to wake up early enough to trek to the dining hall -- even in Hill, which has one right downstairs. "We were both sitting in the Hill cafeteria one day and we thought of how great breakfast in bed would be," Nimmer explained. But cooking -- which is, after all, what their business revolves around -- was not as easy as it sounded, as the two quickly discovered. Though both could cook a complete meal before they started their service, they needed to learn how to whip up some of the traditional breakfast foods with which they were less than familiar. "The first day, when we only had one or two customers, I was stuck cooking eggs and I didn't really know -- it was [a] struggle and a guessing experiment," Nimmer said. "I learned very quickly how to make eggs. Likewise, Adam learned to cook foods that he didn't know how to. Now, we both can do it all whenever we need to," he added. At first, the service started with just cold meals from food bought from grocery and convenience stores like Brown's Thriftway and Wawa. They started by advertising their service through fliers and by wearing T-shirts with the service's name and operating their own Web site on the Internet: www.geocities.com/BreakfastSmiles. Hill College House Dean Amy Pollock helped the pair in starting their business by explaining the rules of promoting a business in the college house. "They have lots of energy and are really motivated. They are willing to hear what people want," Pollock said. "That's the way to make it work." The two student entrepreneurs said the time the service has required has not taken away from their academics. Sometimes Nimmer has to run the service while Chewning goes to his morning Spanish class. "Usually in between orders, they are sitting down and doing homework," explained Engineering freshman Joseph Brown, who lives on the same floor as Nimmer and Chewning and has also purchased a meal plan. "Adam stays up really late doing homework, just trying to get things done -- and he has fun at the same time," Nomi said. But don't think that getting breakfast served in bed comes without its cost. The three different meal plans range in price from $22.50 to $28.75, with five meals in each one. The cold meals consist of cereals, fruits and breads, while the warm meals consist of pancakes, bacon and eggs. A full description of the menu can be viewed on the Web site. Students who have paid for a meal plan in advance e-mail either Chewning or Nimmer their breakfast requests by the night before. The two freshmen have collected more than $250 in revenue -- with the goal of pulling in $1,000 by the end of the year -- in the past few weeks, Chewning explained. They have yet to make a real profit, though. Chewning and Nimmer's friends and acquaintances said they appreciate this new business and, without exception, describe the two as being hardworking. "I think really highly of them," Yeung said. "I think they've very respectful and easy to talk to." Nomi added, "They're great guys and they're really motivated." What the future holds for the breakfast-in-bed business is uncertain, however, since both students are currently pledging Delta Upsilon and expect to live in the house next year. Still, they fully expect to continue the service through the rest of this academic year. "The first reason we did it was for the learning experience," Nimmer said. "And we're still working on the learning curve," Chewning added.


Man expected to recover after shooting

(02/22/00 10:00am)

No arrests have been made after a man was shot in the stomach early Monday outside a U. City nightclub. Philadelphia and University Police Department detectives spent the day yesterday investigating the shooting of a man outside a popular West Philadelphia nightclub. The shooting occurred just outside of the Pegasus Showcase, located at 3801 Chestnut Street, shortly after the establishment closed at 2 a.m. The victim -- an unidentified man who police said is not affiliated with the University -- was taken to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and admitted at around 3 a.m. after being shot in the stomach. Although the man's condition as of last night was unclear, a HUP spokeswoman said his condition was listed as serious at the time of admittance, and police on the scene said he was expected to recover from his injuries. Though no arrests have been made and no primary suspects have been identified, police are continuing to question witnesses, according to University Police Deputy Chief of Investigations Thomas King. King added that the investigators are having some trouble getting concrete accounts of the incident from witnesses. "[Philadelphia Police Department detectives] interviewed a whole bunch of witnesses, and nobody saw anything," King said. A witness at the scene said the victim -- who King confirmed was a deejay at the club that evening -- was shot while standing between two parked cars in front of the club. The witness added that the shooting followed some sort of melee between exiting patrons. It was unclear whether the victim had been part of that brawl. In November 1998, a former Temple University student was the victim of a fatal hit-and-run outside of Pegasus. The Pegasus club's previous incarnations include FUBAR, a bar/dance club that opened in 1995, and, before that, a concert venue known as the Chestnut Cabaret.


Talk links Econ 1 to real life

(02/22/00 10:00am)

Someone once asked Joel Klein why he chose to work for the government if he was so smart. For Klein, the assistant United States attorney general of the Antitrust Division, the decision to work for the government was an easy one since he believes public service is the highest calling. And he wants Penn students to know that. On Thursday, Klein -- who has made a name for himself as the chief prosecutor in the Microsoft trial -- discussed antitrust policy in the 21st century to a roomful of about 45 students and professors. The second speaker in this year's Gruss Public Management Speaker series, Klein stressed the importance of antitrust regulation in keeping markets competitive. He discussed the Justice Department's actions in last fall's Microsoft case and explained why the courts ruled that Microsoft's actions were unfair business practices. Klein also pointed to three European companies -- including one vitamin cartel, which had thrived for nine years -- that have been "knocked down" due to antitrust violations. He stressed that large corporations are not guilty of antitrust violations just by virtue of their size. "Big is not necessarily bad," Klein said. Students agreed that Klein did an excellent job in defending the stance of the United States government with regard to the antitrust policy. "He reaffirmed my faith in the Antitrust Division," Wharton and Engineering senior Josh Loyd said. Audience members applauded Klein's eloquence and straightforwardness. "I thought he was a real example of communication skills in action," said William Whitney, an Economics Professor and the associate director of the Wharton Undergraduate Division. Whitney had urged his students to come listen to Klein speak. "The speech showed that Econ 1 and 2 are directly related and applicable to the big public policy that we read about in the paper everyday," Whitney said. Klein opened his talk by discussing the growth of the American economy and the Internet in the last decade. "Ten years ago, we didn't know of the Internet [and] the economy was sluggish. Antitrust was not being seriously enforced," Klein said. With increased competition, Klein said, the emphasis on antitrust policy has grown. Now, about 30 grand juries are looking at various cartel cases, according to Klein, as antitrust enforcement continues to catch on globally. Many students were glad they were able to relate Klein's lecture to information from their classes regarding economic policy, cartels and mergers. "He didn't use terms beyond our understanding," College freshman Narahari Phatak said. At the end of his lecture, Klein reminded the students present that they "owe this country something" and urged them to consider public service as a career. Speaking at universities like Penn, Klein explained, "gives me a chance to get my message across to people who, I think, are our future leaders of this world. Young people have an obligation to give back."


Yale prof pleads guilty to child porn charge

(02/22/00 10:00am)

More than a year after being arrested for receiving and possessing child pornography, Yale Geology Professor Antonio Lasaga pleaded guilty on Friday to the charges against him. Lasaga, who has been on leave from the professorship since his arrest in November 1998, admitted to receiving tens of thousands of images of child pornography on his computer and possessing two videocassettes of a child engaged in sexual acts. The professor agreed to plead guilty to two of the federal charges filed against him in exchange for five other charges being dropped. Lasaga has been the subject of investigation since the Federal Bureau of Investigation seized pornographic pictures of children in 1998 from his on-campus apartment in the college house where he was the faculty master. Lasaga, 50, was to be tried this week in U.S. District Court. "We find it distressing that these crimes were committed by a member of our community," Yale spokesman Lawrence Haas said. "The university will be taking appropriate action at the appropriate time." Under federal sentencing guidelines, the plea agreement recommends that Lasaga be sentenced to a jail term of 135 to 168 months -- about 11 to 14 years -- and pay a $17,500 to $175,000 fine, the Yale Daily News said. U.S. District Judge Alvin Thompson will sentence Lasaga on May 8, after the U.S. Probation Office has prepared a pre-sentencing report. The judge could sentence Lasaga up to 20 years in jail and a maximum fine of $500,000. Lasaga's attorney, William Dow, would not speculate as to what the sentence would be. "Professor Lasaga has acknowledged his wrongdoing. His fate is now in the hands of the court," Dow said in a written statement after the plea was entered. In addition to the federal charges, Lasaga faces state charges, including first-degree sexual assault and the promotion of an obscene performance, in reference to the videotapes. Under the agreement, Lasaga must undergo a polygraph test to verify that he no longer possesses any child pornography. Federal agents determined that Lasaga had been using an Internet portal site since 1996 to download child pornography. In his written statement, Dow said Lasaga's situation "teaches us once again that even the most accomplished of us cannot escape the experiences of our youth." Because Lasaga waived his right to further appeals in the federal case by pleading guilty, he will have to accept whatever sentence Thompson gives him in May.


'USA Today' honors three U. students

(02/22/00 10:00am)

Andrew March, Kristina Herbert and Sarah Zimbler received academic awards. Three Penn students were recognized for academic and extracurricular achievement on Friday by USA Today, being named to the newspaper's All-USA College Academic Team. College senior Andrew March was named to the first team, the highest level of the competition. Only 20 students nationwide were selected for first-team status. College senior Sarah Zimbler was selected for third-team honors and College senior Kristina Herbert received an honorable mention. The competition, open to students nationwide, required entrants to submit two letters of recommendation, an essay and a list of activities. Winners were selected by a panel of 12 judges from various national academic organizations on the basis of academics, activities, leadership and real-world experience. "We are blessed with bright, articulate students, and this would seem to validate that," University spokesman Ken Wildes said of the three honorees. "We're very proud of all three of them." March, a Marshall scholar triple-majoring in History, Political Science and Islamic Studies, was featured in the newspaper's cover story on the awards. He was chosen for his work monitoring student demonstrations and elections in Kosovo, knowledge of 12 languages and scholarly work accomplished under six research grants. Those receiving first-team honors were given a $2,500 cash prize. "I'm happy," said March, 23. "I have a son and I need the money for childcare." Zimbler, the third-team honoree, is a Truman scholar majoring in History and English. She serves as a coordinator of the West Philadelphia Tutoring Project and helped to develop PENNlincs, a group that encourages local public school students to become involved with math and science. She could not be reached for comment last night. Herbert first found out that she had been given honorable mention by an e-mail from an acquaintance. "I was pretty startled. I got an e-mail notifying me from someone on campus and I was kind of struck," Herbert said. "I'm pretty happy to be selected." Herbert, a Biochemistry and Biophysics major, was nominated for the award by Ponzy Lu, chairman of Penn's Biochemistry Program. Herbert has worked as an assistant in Lu's lab since her freshman year and runs seminars for the Biochemistry Club. She also serves as a peer advisor for students in the Vagelos Scholars Program and tutors with TEACH West Philadelphia.


Harker appoints Schmittlein as new deputy dean

(02/22/00 10:00am)

Newly appointed Wharton Dean Patrick Harker announced yesterday that David Schmittlein will take over as the school's deputy dean. In his new position, effective March 1, Schmittlein -- the Ira A. Lipman professor of Marketing and chairman of the Marketing Department -- will serve as Wharton's chief academic officer and second-in-command. "I've been at Wharton for 20 years? and there's no place I'd rather be," Schmittlein said. "The opportunity to work with a great faculty is something that just doesn't seem right to turn down." According to Harker, who held the deputy dean position until being appointed dean of Wharton on February 8, Schmittlein has proved to be a strong academic administrator. "He's a very effective department chair in attracting and recruiting faculty," Harker said. Schmittlein played a role in developing the electronic commerce MBA program, which was approved last November. Before becoming chairman of the Marketing Department in 1994, he served as vice dean and director of Wharton's doctoral programs, and before that as co-director at the Center for Marketing Strategy Research. Schmittlein said faculty recruitment will be a top priority for him in his new role, noting that keeping the faculty at the forefront of technological innovations and fundamental changes in the learning environment is an ongoing challenge. Schmittlein and Harker agreed that Wharton classes will have an emphasis on information technology. Harker praised Schmittlein's efforts in the development of the MBA program in electronic commerce. Schmittlein said he will focus on maintaining solid relationships between Wharton and various companies -- whether they be consulting firms or e-commerce corporations -- and bringing their expertise into the classroom. "I want to make sure that the work we do here? gets the visibility it deserves," Schmittlein added. Schmittlein serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Interactive Marketing, Marketing Letters and the Journal of Marketing Research. In 1993 he won the Wharton Undergraduate Excellence in Teaching Award. Schmittlein received his doctoral degree and master's degree in philosophy from Columbia University and his bachelor of arts degree from Brown University. Schmittlein is currently working on research projects involving customer purchase patterns, the assessment of future sales potential and direct marketing.


Homosexuality in art discussed

(02/22/00 10:00am)

Studying homosexual representations in artwork from antiquity to the present is not only a hobby for James Saslow -- it is also his job. Saslow, a professor of Art History at Queens College, delivered a lecture entitled "Researching Gay and Lesbian Art: Conceptual Roadblocks and Practical Pitfalls," Thursday night at the Institute of Contemporary Art. During the discussion, which was the ninth in an annual series co-sponsored by the ICA and the Philadelphia Lesbian and Gay Academic Union, Saslow promoted his new book, Pictures and Passions: A History of Homosexuality in the Visual Arts, and explained the research problems he encountered in the process of writing his book. The approximately 35-member audience that attended the lecture consisted mainly of Penn graduate students and various Philadelphia residents. Saslow started his lecture with a slide of the "Warren Cup," a jug from antiquity displaying a homoerotic scene between two men. "This is the sort of thing I thought I was looking for when I started researching gay art," Saslow said. Only later did he realize that "gay art does not have to be overtly homosexual." "There is a need to broaden the definition of gay art -- focusing not just on acts, but desires," he explained. With this new concept in mind, the scope of gay art broadened to include classics such as Thomas Eakins' "The Swimming Hole," Marsden Hartley's "Painting No. 47" and Michelangelo's "David" and the "Dying Slave," among others. Saslow amused the audience with a quotation from lesbian author Rita Mae Brown, who once joked that "if Michelangelo had been straight, the Sistine chapel would have been painted white with a roller." For well-known artists to be included as homosexual artists showed the "validation of one's own identity and fantasy," Saslow said. Saslow noted that the treatment of gay art -- from being morally accepted in ancient Greece and Rome to being considered taboo in the Middle Ages -- has varied significantly over time. A more recent trend, Saslow pointed out, is that people have become so desensitized to seeing erotic homosexual art that it evokes barely any reaction from the majority of museum-goers. [Gay art] is "no longer a source of energy and passion," Saslow said. Following the lecture, a Penn graduate student, who wished to be identified just by Chris, disagreed with Saslow's claim that homosexual art has now lost much of its "shock value" and "political urgency." "It's not maybe an issue in certain academic urban circles, but there still is a problem in middle America," the student said. For many in the audience on Thursday, Saslow's talk provided an opportunity to hear an expert discuss one of the more popular -- if not controversial -- topics in art circles today.


Playoffs twice as nice for Hockey club

(02/22/00 10:00am)

The Penn men's ice hockey club advanced to the playoffs in two different leagues this season. Although Rider nudged the Penn men's club ice hockey team a little bit closer to midnight this weekend, the grand ball of the Red and Blue's Cinderella season still seems far from ending. The Broncs eliminated the Red and Blue, 5-2, in the semifinals of the Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Hockey Association (MACHA) playoffs Saturday with their breakaway, high-pressure offense. Penn, however, still has this coming weekend's Delaware Valley Collegiate Hockey Conference (DVCHC) playoffs remaining, which will give the team a chance to wrap up its rags-to-riches season on a winning note. In fact, a winning note is almost guaranteed by assistant captain Whit Matthews, who helped Penn clinch first place in the DVCHC and a first-round bye in the playoffs by tallying four assists in the team's 7-4 win over conference opponent Kutztown Friday at the Class of 1923 Ice Rink. "Only one team is going to be left winning, and I'm pretty confident that everyone on the team right now wants to finish off the season with a couple of wins," he said. "We all know we have the skill to do it and we're the team that deserves to be in the finals." The Quakers have already proven that they are the dominant team in the DVCHC. Their 17-game conference record is tainted only with early-season losses to Millersville and Princeton -- both fellow members of the MACHA. But since the Princeton loss in late October, Penn has torn through its remaining 13 games, outscoring conference opponents 93-30. The Red and Blue also made up for their earlier losses during this run, beating Millersville 3-1 before winter break and exacting revenge on the Tigers two weekends ago with a 5-3 win. "We definitely know we can take care of any of those teams in that league," Matthews said. "We've beaten everybody in the DVCHC this year, and most of them twice. We've got a lot of confidence going into [the playoffs]." With their first-place status, the Quakers, along with No. 2 Temple, have been automatically advanced into the semifinals of the playoffs . The two top teams will face the winners of No. 3 St. Joe's-No. 6 Princeton and No. 4 Millersville- No. 5 Kutztown Sunday at the Lehigh Valley Ice Arena, with Penn taking on the lowest-seeded advancing team. The DVCHC finals will then be played in a best-of-three series the following weekend, March 3-5, at Lehigh Valley Ice Arena. Although Matthews is expecting a smooth ride to the DVCHC championship after the Quakers' decisive clinching of the regular season title, things weren't so easy for Penn in the more competitive MACHA. The Quakers were the lowest-ranked of the four teams coming into Saturday's MACHA playoffs, held at Monmouth University, and were paired up with top-ranked Rider for the semifinal round. Penn, though, didn't consider itself an underdog going in. After a dismal 0-9 showing in the league's inaugural season last year, the Quakers boasted a 7-5 record and had notched at least one win against all of the league's six member teams. Rider, in fact, had been the Red and Blue's first MACHA victim when they surprised the Broncs, 5-4, in early October. "They weren't expecting our team to be nearly as skilled as it was, especially from years past when they've blown out the team," Matthews said. Rider regained composure, though, and defeated Penn, 6-3, at the Class of 1923 Ice Rink right before winter break. Saturday's MACHA semifinal would break the 1-1 series between the teams and also send the winner to Sunday's championship game. Matthews felt his team was ready to put the series in their favor, "but things didn't work as we would have liked." Despite outshooting the Broncs 35-31, Rider's up-tempo offense, anchored by MACHA leading scorer John Lyons' four goals, overpowered the Penn defense and goalie Pat Baude. Baude faced multiple Rider breakaways during the game, which can be attributed to Penn's own aggressive offensive strategy. "We really knew that even though they had a strong offensive team, we couldn't strictly play a defensive game," Matthews said. The Penn offensive push resulted in a weakened back line, which Rider used to its advantage with three breakaway goals. Despite the loss and elimination from the tournament at the hands of eventual-champion Rider, Matthews said he was very pleased with Penn's showing in the MACHA this season. "We made a great showing against all those teams this year," he said. "It would have been more satisfying to win the MACHA playoffs than the DVCHC playoffs, [because] it definitely takes a lot more skill to beat the teams that we would have beaten in the MACHA. "But we beat them all once, and that was far more than what was expected last year."


W. Hoops game to feature ticket raffle

(02/22/00 10:00am)

For a quartet of lucky fans, March Madness will start four days before the end of February. The Penn Athletic Department has planned a barrage of promotions to increase attendance at the Palestra when the Penn women's basketball team hosts Harvard on Saturday night. The Quakers are tied with the Crimson for second place in the Ivy League, one game behind front-running Dartmouth. The highlight of these promotions will be a raffle, with the two top prizes being a pair of tickets to either the men's Final Four at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis or the women's Final Four at Philadelphia's First Union Center. The winners of the raffle will then have to make one-of-three free throws before they actually obtain the Final Four tickets. Raffle tickets cost $2, and all proceeds will benefit the Undergraduate Assembly's outdoor basketball court project. "This seems like an operation that serves everybody's needs," said Bill Richter, Penn's coordinator of marketing and special events. "We want more fans to come and support the women, who are on the cusp of perhaps their first ever NCAA bid, and the UA wants some funds to support their outdoor court. So it seems like everybody wins." Other promotions for the game include a halftime shot for $5,000, as well as giveaways of Amtrak Metroliner tickets to New York and U.S. Airways tickets. A large contingent of Girl Scouts is also anticipated, as the first 500 people in attendance under the age of 12 will receive free Penn women's basketball T-shirts. Richter expects "a couple thousand people" to attend the game -- one that will have a large impact on the Ivy League title race. Attendance for Penn women's basketball has increased this season, but it is still uncommon to see as many as 500 fans in the Palestra for a game. "As a new coach, I've been kind of surprised by the lack of attendance, so I'm hoping that these promotions bring students in to our games for the first time this year," Penn coach Kelly Greenberg said. In addition to helping the Quakers draw fans, these promotions should also greatly benefit the UA, which needs funds for its $190,000 outdoor basketball court project. Construction of the courts on the roof of the parking garage on 38th and Spruce streets was approved by the University last month and is expected to be completed by September. To promote the giveaways at this Saturday's game, the UA -- in conjunction with the Athletic Department -- will send out mailings this week and make raffle tickets available on Locust Walk starting tomorrow. "A lot of people have never been to a women's game," Richter said. "The team is exciting. They're doing very well, and we'll make for a very festive atmosphere."


National champ W. Squash returns to campus

(02/22/00 10:00am)

The Quakers haven't had a good chance to celebrate their victory - yet. A day after capturing the national title that has eluded them for 24 long years, the members of the Penn women's squash team got back to life as usual yesterday. The magnitude of the national championship, however, still has not completely set in for all of the Quakers. "It hasn't really hit me, what we've actually done," junior Helen Bamber said. "After we won, I was thinking about all the other teams we saw playing, and it was amazing for me to think we were better than all of them." After vanquishing Princeton in the finals of the Howe Cup in New Haven, Conn., the Quakers started on their way home to begin celebrating -- sort of. "We had high anticipations of celebrating last night when we got in, but we wanted to go to to one last dinner as a team," senior Paige Kollock said. "That took a while, and we ran out of steam." Upon their return to Philadelphia, the members of the team generally went home to unwind or to study for impending exams. "We were all pretty exhausted from the weekend," freshman Runa Reta said. "I had an exam today and papers due." Many of the Red and Blue had no time at all to rest quite yet given the crunch of academic demands. "I haven't had a chance to celebrate yet -- I've been studying," Bamber said. "But [tomorrow] night, we're going to celebrate -- big time." Others, though, got an early jump on celebrating their athletic success yesterday by doing the least athletic things possible. At this stage in their academic lives, Penn's seniors can certainly afford to relax a bit more and let their achievement sink in. "I slept through my first class," Patrick said. "And then I did nothing." But the team does indeed plan to do something to celebrate, and hopes to do so with its coach as one of the gang. "Ultimately, we'd like to get Demer [Holleran] out with us because we know that she wants to come out but she's caught by what she thinks is being a good coach," Kollock said. "If we can get her out, it will be a fun time." For the Quakers, it will be a fun time that has been a long time in coming, but well worth the wait. "We thought we could do it the past three years," Patrick said. "To have actually done it is good." As Penn's No. 1, Patrick's season will actually continue, as she moves on to individual championships. But for her fellow senior co-captain Kollock, the team championship is a sweet end to a long athletic road. "I did not have these expectations going into my senior year," Kollock said. "I thought last year was our year and I just wanted to finish out having a good season, and this was not in the cards. I guess it's just a serendipity. I'm not going to reject it. I can't think of a better way to end my athletic career."


W. Track passes final pre-Heps test at GMU

(02/22/00 10:00am)

Liz Wittels set yet another new Penn record in the pole vault. By turning in probably its best meet of the season Saturday, the Penn women's track team gave notice to all of its rivals that the Quakers are a force to be reckoned with as the indoor season draws to a close. With the all-important Heptagonal Championships a mere week away, the Red and Blue went to Fairfax, Va., to compete in an invitational hosted by George Mason. The Quakers turned in a host of impressive performances which bode well for the team's chances at the end of this week at Dartmouth for Heps. One highlight of the meet for Penn was the efforts by pole vaulters Ami Desai and Liz Wittels. Wittels broke the school pole vault record for the third time in under a month en route to winning the event with a vault of 11'6 1/4". Desai was also impressive, finishing in third-place with a leap of 10'6". "Those two are so big for our team," Penn assistant coach Tony Tenisci said. "It is really neat because they are such close friends and really feed off of each other. They go back and forth all the time and are both doing really well." Perhaps the biggest surprise in the meet was the breakthrough performance by the team's 4x400 relay squad. The team of sophomore Jeraldine Cofie, junior Melissa MacIntyre, sophomore Petra Stewart and junior Bassey Adjah turned in its fastest time of the year in the event with a 3:54.29 to finish second in the meet. "It was incredible what our relay teams did," MacIntyre said. "Not only did our first team go out and turn in an awesome time, but our B-team came in with a better time than the A-team previously had all season." Adjah turned in a solid all-around meet for the Quakers. Besides being a member of the 4x400 relay team, Adjah set a personal record in the long jump to finish fifth and placed fourth in the 60-meter hurdles. The 200-meter dash was another event in which Penn excelled. Senior Richelle Clements placed second in the race with a time of 26.20, and junior Qianna Snooks was third, finishing in 26.68. The meet at George Mason had an interesting format. The 10 teams competing in the field were limited to only two runners per event. This greatly limits available spots and caused the Quakers to bring a limited number of athletes. "This was a great meet for us to have right before Heps," Tenisci said. "We decided that we could rest up some people and give a break to some people who have nagging injuries because of the limit of two per event." The meet seemed to help the squad build an increased sense of team unity at this very important juncture. Maybe it was the smaller group of people, or maybe it was just the fact that everyone was performing so well, but the bottom line was that the team really came together as a unit. "With the smaller number of people we really bonded, and everyone came together," Wittels said. "I don't know if it was because we had less athletes, but when you have your whole team waiting and wildly cheering for you, it really pushes you forward." Penn will now have one final week to make any last minute adjustments and to make sure everyone is ready to go. "We are trying to taper our practice time so we can keep our legs fresh," Wittels said. "What's done is done at this point in the season, and we just want to make sure that we don't have any injuries." All season Penn has preached the importance of being ready when it really counts, meaning at Heps. With the abundance of outstanding performances in Fairfax, it appears that the Quakers have indeed peaked at the right time.


Gymnastics lands fifth in prep for Saturday's Classic

(02/22/00 10:00am)

Lauren Hittner broke the Penn all-around record for the third straight week. The Penn gymnastics team faced more than its fair share of adversity at Towson this past Sunday, but the Quakers fought hard enough to feel confident in their chances for an Ivy Classic four-peat. Although the Quakers placed just fifth out of six teams at the meet with George Washington taking first place, the majority of Penn's routines were solid enough to earn a team point total of 188.900 -- consistent with the Red and Blue's previous performances this season. Continuing her three-week long streak, Penn sophomore Lauren Hittner, who is also a DP staff photographer, broke her own record in the individual all-around point total, scoring a 38.800. This score surpassed her previous mark of 38.725, set against Temple little over a week ago. "I'm enjoying it because it means that I'm contributing to the team effort," Hittner said. Penn's Jenn Capasso also turned in a solid performance. The junior established a new personal best with a 38.250 in the individual all-around score. "Our two all-arounders, Lauren and Jenn, really performed well for us this weekend," Penn captain Lizzie Jacobson said. Penn freshman Veena Abraham showed promise for the future. Her floor exercise routine earned a 9.575, her personal best in the event. "[Although the meet] definitely wasn't our best performance, some people stepped up, especially the freshmen. Veena turned in her best performance of the season," Penn sophomore Juliana Mariani said. With Ivy rival Yale edging out the Quakers for fourth place by less than a point and with ECAC foe James Madison earning less than one point more than that, the Red and Blue are not concerned about the future implications the meet may have. "The scores were very close, so placing fifth was not as far from the top as it sounds," Penn coach Tom Kovic said. Perhaps most impressive about the Quakers' performance at the meet, however, was the resiliency of the team after making some uncharacteristic early mistakes on the uneven bars. "We took it one event at a time. We had some falls here and there, but we didn't give up. It was a good fight to the end," Jacobson said. That is not to say, however, that the Quakers are satisfied with their performance. "It was a good wake-up call. [The meet] was a way to get out all of our mistakes, so we can get ready for the championship meets," Mariani said. The Quakers may have been dealt a severe blow to their lineup, as junior Kelly Haberer suffered a foot injury after her second vault on Sunday. "It's very unfortunate that she hurt herself now because this has been the best season of her entire career," Kovic said. Haberer underwent X-rays yesterday afternoon. Her status for Saturday's Ivy Classic is still up in the air. Still, Kovic believes that his Quakers' depth will ensure a solid performance in the Ivy Classic at Cornell. "The depth we have is going to cover our loss. We are two or three deep, so although we may not present the strongest team, we will still be strong," Kovic said. The Quakers will now turn their attention to trying to win a fourth straight Ivy Classic. Facing Yale at Towson only fueled their competitive fire. "When we put our stuff together, we are a better team [than Yale], which only makes us want to beat them more," Jacobson said. "They just seem to really compete well against us." The Quakers know they must be consistently excellent in order to achieve a four-peat at the Ivy Classic. "We know we're a 190 team now, so [the Towson meet] was reassuring going into Ivies this weekend," Mariani said. Using their season-long consistency to build team momentum and confidence, there is no doubt of the Quakers' focus this week. Come Saturday, they will be competing to continue their tradition of winning and to prove once again that they are still in charge in the Ivy League.


Dunphy, Chaney both are unhappy

(02/21/00 10:00am)

Decked out in a black knit watch cap and scarf, Temple men's basketball coach John Chaney addressed the media last night. The Owls had just defeated Penn, 53-42, at the Palestra, but you wouldn't know it from what Chaney said about his squad. The insults began to fly as Chaney discussed the play of Temple center Marc Jackson. The Quakers had attempted to double-team Jackson, with little success. The 6-foot-10 sophomore had 16 points and 13 rebounds in the contest, dominating center Tim Krug and forward Paul Romanczuk in the low post with apparent ease. Yet Chaney was not satisfied. "They mix it up," Chaney said of Penn's interior defense on Jackson. "They'll catch him. Instead of him dropping, he would go high. So the man would get him from behind a lot. That's very difficult for him to read, so you've got to dial 911 and get your ass out of there and look across the court to get that swingman." Temple swingmen Lynard Stewart and Huey Futch also drew Chaney's wrath. Futch stepped into the starting lineup last night after guard Johnny Miller dislocated his shoulder in the Owls' last game against Fordham. But matched up against guard Garett Kreitz, Futch chipped in only three points -- less than half his season average -- and six defensive rebounds. Stewart added 12 points, well above his average of 6.6 per game, but contributed only one rebound. "Lynard and Huey just don't make that spread fast enough," Chaney said. "They're slow-ass people. So when [Jackson] starts to look for them, the Penn guy has a chance to help and recover to them. Now [Jackson] finds himself backing his man up again, and I'm screaming at him." That seems to be a constant within Chaney's system. The post-game trash-talking continued as Chaney described his trademark match-up zone. The Owls actually managed to improve upon their scoring defense (59.2 ppg) -- fourth best in the nation -- by holding Penn to just 42 points. The Quakers turned in a pathetic offensive performance against the Temple zone, making only 22.8 percent of their shots from the floor and 21.1 percent from long range in 38 attempts. Temple did a near-flawless job shutting down the passing lanes, stifling Penn's motion offense and forcing the Quakers outside. The height differential became a huge factor in the game then, as Penn found few available shots without a Temple hand in the way. "What would appear sometimes to be an opening many times was not," Penn head coach Fran Dunphy said. "You think you've got a wide gap before that shot's taken, but all of a sudden it's closed very quickly. We probably needed to get in the middle more and attack the basket once we got it in the middle." Both teams shot poorly, particularly in the second half, when neither squad topped 23 percent. The first half was the difference in the contest, as Temple made 48 percent of its shots and emerged with a 14-point lead by halftime. After scoring just 18 first-half points, the Quakers went into intermission searching for adjustments. "We hoped we would just come out and things would change," Krug said. "We figured you can't play that badly and continue into the second half." Unfortunately for Penn, its shooting woes persisted after the break. Quakers' swingman Ira Bowman suffered most of all. Scoreless at halftime, the Penn co-captain managed only four points on two free throws and a running jumper -- all within the last 1 minute, 21 seconds of the contest. Kreitz was the sole Quaker able to overcome the stifling Temple defense, leading Penn with 15 points, all from beyond the arc. "You can't stop shooting," Krug said. "You can't sit back and say the shots aren't falling so don't take them. You just have to keep shooting and hope they start dropping." Unfortunately for the Quakers, the shots never started to fall.


City Planning prof to be honored in Japan

(02/21/00 10:00am)

Ian McHarg, founder of Penn's architecture department, will accept the prestigious Japan Prize. As a young boy growing up in Scotland, Ian McHarg possessed a profound passion for nature. At age 16, he became a landscape architect's apprentice. He then began on his path to establishing himself as perhaps the most respected regional planner of today, designing such projects as Baltimore's Inner Harbor. "I had been deeply moved by nature as a young boy," said McHarg,79, professor emeritus of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning and the original founder of the department, in an unmistakable Scottish brogue. "I am now a very old man, and I am still overwhelmed by it." Throughout his career, McHarg has won a slew of prizes, including the Harvard Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Medal of Art -- presented by former President George Bush in 1992 -- and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture from the University of Virginia. Adding yet another accolade to his repertoire, McHarg will travel to Tokyo in April to receive the Japan Prize in city planning. Presented annually to scientists and researchers who have made a contribution to mankind, the distinction includes a certificate of merit, a medal and a cash award of approximately $482,000. The week-long ceremony will be attended by the prime minister of Japan as well as the emperor and empress. The University Trustees expressed their gratitude for McHarg's contributions to the field of city planning at their meeting last week, passing a resolution of appreciation for him. After graduating from Harvard in 1950 with both a bachelor's and master's degree, McHarg was invited to Penn by G. Holmes Perkins, past chairman of planning at Harvard and then-dean of the Penn Graduate School of Fine Arts. For 32 years, McHarg headed the department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning. During his chairmanship, McHarg was also a partner in a private planning practice. His project credits include Amelia Island in Florida and Pardisan in Iran. Recognized as one of the first advocates of the inclusion of ecological factors in structural planning, McHarg is known for combining such sciences as geology, hydrology and marine biology into his planning. He explained that in planning strategy, "before [me] socio-economic boundaries were considered almost exclusively." McHarg counts teaching as perhaps his greatest passion. "It has been a wonderful podium for me to use as an advocate of the environment," he noted. His only regret is that he is not able to teach more. "I teach one course per year, and I grind my teeth in chagrin because I know that I am as good as I was 10 years ago, maybe even better, and it offends me that I am so limited," he said. McHarg is also not thrilled with the emeritus title that he was granted after stepping down as chairman of the department in 1985. "I think the title [Professor Emeritus] suggests senility and hopelessness," he said. An author, a poet, an architect, a planner and a father, McHarg now lives with his wife Carol and their two sons, 12 and 17, in a converted schoolhouse that his wife restored in Unionville, Pa. His book, Design With Nature, focuses on the incorporation of environmental factors into architecture and planning and, according to McHarg, continues to be a "badge of the environmental movement." His newest book, Some Songs to the Stars, a volume of 25 collected poems, is scheduled to come out within the year. He continues to lecture on a regular basis. "I hope not to retire," McHarg said with simplicity. "May I persist to the last."


Wrestling wins Ivies, but falls to Lehigh

(02/21/00 10:00am)

A controversial call and a forfeit at 125 did not help the Quakers in their meet with the Engineers. In a battle of the top two teams in the EIWA, No. 12 Lehigh used an unlikely hero and an uncontested bout to snatch eastern bragging rights away from No. 15 Penn yesterday at the Palestra. After a stunning upset of Penn star heavyweight Bandele Adeniyi-Bada by Lehigh sophomore Shawn Laughlin and a Penn forfeit at 125 pounds, the Engineers (19-2, 8-0 EIWA) held on to defeat the Quakers, 19-15. The Quakers (9-5, 5-1) clinched their fifth straight Ivy League title the night before with a 30-15 win over Princeton. Penn, also looking for its fifth straight EIWA championship, now has to defend its title in the tournament next month as a No. 2 seed after yesterday's loss. Lehigh's Rob Rohn, ranked No. 11, started off the day with a 9-3 decision over Penn's Mike Gadsby in the 184-pound bout, but Mike Fickell evened the match score with his close 5-4 victory over Glauco Lolli-Ghetti. National No. 16 Fickell and Lolli-Ghetti both started the match furiously, with a Fickell takedown, a Lolli-Ghetti reversal and a Fickell escape making the score 3-2 in the first 30 seconds of the contest. After Fickell held on to win and tied the meet score 3-3, Penn seemed assured the driver's seat with No. 5 Adeniyi-Bada heading up against the sophomore Laughlin in the heavyweight bout. But Laughlin had other plans. With four seconds left in the first period, Laughlin turned Adeniyi-Bada for a crucial takedown and a 2-0 lead. After riding Adeniyi-Bada out for a large part of the second period and getting an escape point to start the third, Laughlin had a 3-1 lead plus a point for riding time. But Laughlin was hit for a stalling penalty with 29 seconds left, opening the door for Adeniyi-Bada to tie the bout with a takedown. At the end of the third period, Adeniyi-Bada had Laughlin's leg in his grasp, but could not pull the Lehigh wrestler in bounds to secure the takedown. Much to the dismay of Penn coach Roger Reina and the Penn fans in attendance, the referee did not award Adeniyi-Bada the two points, and Laughlin took the victory, 4-2. "[Laughlin's win] surprised me," a beaming Lehigh coach Greg Strobel said after the match. "I was hoping he'd keep it close, and he ended up winning the match. That was huge. Getting that first takedown made it all happen." To make matters worse, with Kevin Rucci still not fully recovered from an injured hand, the Quakers were forced to forfeit the 125-pound bout, giving up six big team points and handing the Engineers a 12-3 lead in the match. Things began to look bleak for the Quakers as Lehigh freshman Tristan Boyd came out blazing against senior Jason Nagle at 133 pounds. With 1:13 left in the first period, Boyd took Nagle down and turned him over for three additional back points, giving himself a 5-0 lead early in the match. But on Senior Day at the Palestra, Nagle was not to be outdone by the freshman. In the second period, Nagle worked his way back into the match, tying the score at six at the end of the period. Late in the third period, down 7-6, Nagle used a duck-under takedown with 10 seconds left to notch a victory for the Quakers before the intermission. Penn's 141-pounder, Jody Giuricich, brought the Quakers back into the match with an upset of his own. Managing to ride out the entire second period, the freshman used his riding time bonus to defeat No. 20 Matt Goldstein in a tight 3-2 win. The bout closed the Engineers lead to 12-9. Strobel decided to send out No. 5 Dave Esposito at 149 pounds, despite the ankle injury Esposito suffered at the NWCA All-Star Meet. "We vacillated on it," Strobel said. "When he warmed up on it today, he was moving real well. I talked to him and I said, 'Before you go to the Easterns, you really need another match.' And he thought, 'Yeah, I can do that,' and he went out and wrestled." And he wrestled well. The Lehigh standout overwhelmed Penn's Jon Gough en route to a 10-2 major decision victory. Down 16-9 but with a pair of No. 2 wrestlers left, Penn had a glint of hope remaining, provided captains Brett Matter (157 pounds) and Rick Springman (174) could get bonus-point victories. Matter controlled his match against Lehigh sophomore Chris Vitale, but Penn's all-time winningest wrestler could not get any bonus points, winning a 9-3 decision. At 165 pounds, Lehigh's Travis Doto, ranked sixth nationally, handled Tim Ortman, winning an 8-1 decision and putting the Engineers ahead 19-12, thus clinching the match. Springman added an 8-5 decision over No. 18 Mark Dufresne to make the final score 19-15. Penn had beaten Lehigh three out of the last five years and had not lost to the Engineers at the Palestra since 1957. But Reina thinks the loss will inspire, not deflate, his squad heading into the EIWA Championships. "To me, this is something that should really light a spark under our guys, to refocus and redouble their efforts," Reina said. "This group has the ability to respond in a very significant manner come the Eastern Championships."