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Big 5 Hall inducts old-timers

(02/29/00 10:00am)

The new inductees were honored yesterday at a ceremony at the Palestra. In a year when the Philadelphia Big 5 returned to the full round robin format, five players that competed before the unofficial league's formation were honored with induction into the City Series' Hall of Fame. Yesterday at the Palestra, Ernie Beck (Penn), Paul Arizin (Villanova), Tom Gola (La Salle), Bill Mlkvy (Temple) and George Senesky (St. Joseph's) joined the Hall of Fame, although none of them ever played in an official Big 5 game. Two recent women's players, St. Joseph's Robyne Bostick and Temple's Margarete Rougier, were also honored with induction. Approximately 200 people gathered for lunch on the Palestra floor to honor the former players. Special guests included the current Big 5 coaches, Philadelphia basketball legend Sonny Hill and former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier. Penn men's coach Fran Dunphy addressed the crowd about Coaches Versus Cancer, a charity supported by the Big 5 and Drexel, and Philadelphia Women's Basketball 2000 Executive Director Cathy Andruzzi spoke of the upcoming women's NCAA Final Four, which Penn and St. Joe's will co-host. Big 5 Executive Director Paul Rubincam also acknowledged the current athletic directors for returning the men's Big 5 to the full round robin. But the focus for the day was on the inductees, the men whose basketball success in Philadelphia led to the creation of the City Series. Although all members of this year's men's class played before doubleheaders at the Palestra and crosstown rivalries defined Philadelphia college basketball, they represent perhaps the most talented group to ever enter the Big 5 Hall of Fame. Beck, Arizin and Gola were all teammates on the 1956 Philadelphia Warriors NBA championship team, coached by Senesky. Mlkvy also played for the Warriors, but stopped in 1953. "Winning the world championship in 1956 is my greatest moment in basketball," Arizin said yesterday. Arizin certainly has had more than his fair share of great moments on the court. A walk-on player as a sophomore at 'Nova, he went on to earn All-America honors as a senior and to set a school record with 85 points in one game. After graduation, he led the NBA in scoring twice and was named one of the 50 greatest NBA players of all-time. He is also a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. Another member of this year's Big 5 class, Gola, is also enshrined in Springfield, Mass. Gola led the Explorers to the NIT title in 1952 and the NCAA championship in 1954, and his 2,201 career rebounds are still an NCAA record. Gola is already in the Big 5 Hall of Fame as the coach of the 1969 La Salle team, which was ranked second in the nation. Emcee and legendary Big 5 radio announcer Al Meltzer listed all of Gola's honors before introducing him. "When [Meltzer] was listing all of the hall of fames, I thought he was being a bigot," Gola joked. "I'm also in the Polish-American Hall of Fame." Another member of the '56 Warriors team, Beck, was the only Quaker honored yesterday. Beck said he felt at home on the Palestra floor. "Sometimes, I think I have shot more balls at the basket in this building than anybody ever," said Beck, who still holds the Penn records for career points (1,827), season points (673) and career rebounds (1,557). He also earned first team All-America honors in 1952-53. The coach of those '56 Warriors, Senesky, was named National Player of the Year and led the nation in scoring in 1943. The only men's honoree not on the '56 Warriors was Mlkvy. Known as the "Owl Without a Vowel," Mlkvy was a first team All-American in 1950-51, averaging 29.2 points per game. The inductees will also be honored at halftime of tonight's Temple-St. Joe's game at the Palestra.


Little goes right for W. Fencing at Temple

(02/29/00 10:00am)

To say that the final dual meet of the season for the Penn women's fencing team began inauspiciously would be an understatement. It was an absolute disaster. After waking up at the crack of dawn, the Quakers met in Penn's fencing room only to discover that there was no bus going to Temple's McGonigle Hall, the site of the multi-meet. When the team finally arrived at the North Philadelphia campus, they had limited time to warm up for the stellar competition that they were about to face -- national powerhouses such as Columbia, Cornell, St. John's and defending national champion Penn State. "The bus was an hour late; we were missing teammates; we had no time to get into the gym to prepare ourselves physically and mentally for the day," senior captain Heba Abdulla said. But the Quakers would not use this as an excuse. "There are no excuses," Penn coach Dave Micahnik said. "On the scoresheet, there's no column for excuse." To begin the day, the Red and Blue took the strip against Ivy League rival Columbia. The match was close through the first two rounds, but the Lions pulled away in the final round, besting the Quakers, 17-10. The Penn sabre squad was able to defeat Columbia, 5-4, behind two victories apiece from Abdulla and freshman Christina Verigan. But Columbia's foilists and epeeists were too strong for the Red and Blue as the Quakers fell in both weapons, 7-2 and 6-3, respectively. After the defeat, however, Penn bounced back to defeat Cornell in its final Ivy League dual meet of the season. While the sabres lost by a slight 5-4 margin, Penn's foilists and epeeists regrouped to lead the Quakers to victory. Penn's epee squad defeated the Big Red, 5-4, behind freshman Kim Linton and sophomore Mindy Nguyen, who won two bouts apiece. Penn's foilists, led by the strong performance of freshman Lauren Staudinger and senior Margo Katz -- who each went undefeated -- handed Cornell a 7-2 loss. This victory was especially important to the seniors because it was the last time in their careers they would fence Ancient Eight opponents. "It's always a good feeling to go undefeated, especially in a match that's close," Katz said. "And in this special circumstance, it feels really good because it's not only the last Ivy match of the season, but of my fencing career." The win over Cornell ended an Ivy season in which the Quakers finished with a mediocre 2-3 record. "I'm disappointed that we didn't do better," Micahnik said. "It's not what I would call a banner year." To end the day, Penn went up against Penn State and St. John's, two of the best fencing programs in the nation. The Red and Blue fell to the Nittany Lions, the five-time defending national champions, by a 24-3 margin as Staudinger, Linton and senior Sandra Yens picked up the lone victories for the Quakers. In the final match of the day, Penn was defeated by St. John's, 18-9. The Red Storm were led to victory by their powerful epee squad that was able to shut out the Quakers, 9-0, behind two-time epee national champion Arlene Stevens. The Penn sabres also came up short, falling 6-3 to a very strong sabre team. Penn sophomore Abby Lifter led the way, winning two of her three bouts. Penn's foil squad, however, was able to come away with a 6-3 win in their final dual meet of the regular season. Staudinger won all three of her bouts, and senior Amy Hozer won two out of three, including a 5-4 win in the final fencing bout of her career. Although Penn was only able to come away with one victory on the day, the Quakers realize that the level of competition was extremely tough. They also realize that everything comes down to next weekend, when they will fence in the IFA playoffs. "Everything that we've worked and trained for will matter the most this Saturday," Abdulla said.


Law Auction: Night of fun and fundraising

(02/29/00 10:00am)

Penn Law students put their books away last Wednesday night for a chance to bid on prizes ranging from a weekend stay in Las Vegas to lunch with former Philadelphia Mayor Ed Rendell. In order to support first-year law students, the Equal Justice Foundation -- a student organization that funds law students who do public interest work over the summer -- hosted an auction night at the Law School for a crowd of over 400 law students, professors and community members. "I got funding when I was a first year, and now I want to give back to some of the younger students," said third-year Law student Scott Weiser, who planned to bid on a picnic with one of his professors. The fundraising event featured almost 300 items in a silent auction and 50 items in the live auction. The auction featured such items as lunch for three at the Center City dining landmark Le Bec-Fin with Law Professor Bruce Mann, tickets for two to the Metropolitan Opera in New York City and a summer getaway to Martha's Vineyard. While the first item -- the winner's name as a character in author Bonnie McDougall's next murder mystery -- sold for just $75, the bids soon jumped to as much as $500 for the opera tickets. Some students expressed surprise at the high prices. "The bids are much more than I expected," third-year Law student Locksley Rhoden said. "People are being generous and are really just jumping into it." Auction chair and third-year Law student Andrew Morton explained that the auction has grown tremendously over the past five years. "Five years ago, the auction raised $2,000 and was basically a glorified bake sale. Tonight we're on track to raise $50,000," Morton said. And the Equal Justice Foundation hopes to continue this growth in future years. "This event has unlimited potential. Once the renovations [to the Law School building] are done, we can accommodate even more people," said Morton, pointing to the standing-room only auditorium. Featuring Law School alumni, Robert Toll -- the chief executive officer of Toll Brothers -- and Renee Chenault, the NBC Channel 10 news anchor, as guest auctioneers, the auction was unique among other Law School events. "This is the most law students you'll ever see in one place," Weiser said. "And more professors come to the auction than to the more prestigious Law School events." Penn Law Professor Ed Rock attended the event to watch himself be auctioned off, as he and fellow Professor Heidi Hurd offered to wash the winner's car while on rollerblades. "I'm offering my services tonight, and maybe I'll bid on something too," Rock said. The fact that the Law School is still without a permanent dean, despite a 15-month search, also provided comedic fodder for the organizers of the event. One third-year Law student jokingly asked for a bid of a mere 50 cents for the position of dean of an Ivy League law school. Last year, the Equal Justice Foundation funded 24 students' government and public interest work. This year they are hoping to fund even more. "Not only does it help the students, but the important work they do might otherwise not be done," Morton said.


Student plan Asian center budget

(02/29/00 10:00am)

As part of its ongoing effort to develop more resources for Asian-American students on campus, the Asian Pacific Student Coalition will submit a budget for a student center to the president and provost tomorrow. The proposal for what would be called the Pan Asian American Community House has been under serious consideration by the administration since the APSC met with University President Judith Rodin last semester. Associate Provost Barbara Lowery said the University has been in favor of the plan. "In general, we've been fairly supportive of having a center," she said. "We're certainly talking about having the University fund it." But Penn still has to review the budget which the APSC was asked to revise after initially submitting it in December. According to Lowery, the previous budget was not specific enough about the various costs of the center. The roughly $212,000 annual budget for PAACH calls for the hiring of a full-time director, along with an administrative assistant, a program coordinator and an academic coordinator. Also in the budget are provisions for a pre-freshman orientation for Asian-American students, a resource library, a lecture series, alumni networking events and other programming and infrastructure expenses. APSC Chairman Sammy Sugiura, a Wharton junior, said the costs are still subject to change and added that some expenses would also be covered by other sources such as the Asian American Studies Department and the Greenfield Intercultural Center. Lowery said she could not determine how much the University would be willing to give and how much would come from alumni donations and from other sources. Former APSC Vice Chairman Jennifer Wound, a College junior, said along with the budget, the APSC will also submit space requirements for PAACH, which will be passed on to the Locust Walk Advisory Committee. The APSC hopes PAACH will be open by the beginning of fall semester. Economics Professor Roberto Mariano was one of the faculty advisors consulted for the PAACH proposal. He said the Christian Association building was one of the locations being considered for the center, although several other groups were also vying for the location. Mariano said he felt the Asian-American community had a great need for the center because of the size of its population. Asian Americans currently constitute 25 percent of the undergraduate student body. He said current spaces such as the GIC were not enough for such a large community. "Kids were spilling out of the room," he said, describing an Asian-American event at the GIC. GIC Director Valerie DeCruz also said she was in support of PAACH. She said the Asian-American student body was so large and diverse that it became difficult for the GIC to cater to its needs along with the needs of its other minority constituencies. Srilata Gangulee, an assistant dean of the College of Arts and Science, has also been involved in the proposal for PAACH. Gangulee was instrumental in creating the Asian American Studies minor in 1997 and is now pushing for the resource center to complement it. She said the center would have strong ties with the ASAM Department. "There needs to be a solid academic grounding," she said. Sugiura also emphasized that PAACH would work closely with the ASAM Department by drawing faculty to the center and encouraging student and faculty interaction as well as providing resources to students in the department. He also said the center's central location would increase visibility and interest in Asian-American studies for both Asian Americans and other students. APSC Vice Chairman and College junior James Yoo said although several schools on the West Coast had Asian-American resource centers, very few schools on the East Coast had them. "Establishing a resource center would heighten Penn's reputation," he said.


Schooling concerns aired

(02/29/00 10:00am)

At a meeting with Mayor Street last night, W. Phila. residents spoke of the need for improved schools. Hundreds of community members filled the auditorium of West Philadelphia High School last night for their second chance this month to address education and neighborhood concerns with Mayor John Street. Complaints about the new Penn-assisted public school and the state of local schools kept Street and Third District Councilwoman Jannie Blackwell's attention for much of the four-hour open-invitation meeting at the school, located at 48th and Walnut streets. Immediately after Street opened the floor for questions, the audience of senior citizens, parents, local students and children assembled into two long lines spanning the length of the room for a chance to speak. The heated discussion about schools that highlighted the last town meeting resurfaced, as dozens more spoke about the plight of area schools -- in particular the Lea School located at 47th and Locust streets. With the backdrop of supportive residents holding signs and banners declaring "equal opportunity for all" and "Lea School has no library, new school has computers," residents submitted a petition of more than 500 signatures to Street, demanding that both Penn and the city give a combined $10 million to improve area schools. "It's dirty. It's dreary. It's depressing," Valeria James-Berry, the vice president of Urban Market Developers and a concerned parent, said of the school. James-Berry said that her eighth grade daughter, who attends the Lea School, tests on a fifth-grade math level. She added that some of the teachers attend school only once a week -- leaving inconsistent instruction by substitute teachers. Lela Shedrick, a resident of 48th and Pine streets and the mother of two, explained that her 10-year-old son, who attends Lea, does not have books to bring home because five students sit around a table and share a book in each class. Street agreed that the biggest problem facing the city is the quality of education in the school. "[But] the city is not on fire about public education, not yet," Street added. "We must decide what we expect from our system." Controversy also again surrounded the Penn-assisted public school -- slated to be built on 42nd and Locust streets -- and its proposed catchment area that the the school board will draw to determine who will attend the new school. Many complained that Penn-affiliated, upper-middle class students would be the only community members to benefit from the still-undetermined catchment area. "We simply want equal education opportunity for the children at the Lea School," said Walnut Hill Community Association President Betty Reavis, who organized the petition. But while educational issues generated the most debate last night, there was room for other topics of discussion. Many voiced concerns about the blight of West Philadelphia neighborhoods and demanded that abandoned houses be fixed up and sold or removed. "The abandoned houses have really taken away the quality of life for us," said Christine McCullough, who has resided on the 300 block of South Frazier Street since 1955. "Either these people shape up or ship out." McCullough, 71, added that some of the houses have been vacant for nearly 20 years and that there are two behind her house. "It's a depressing site, [and] nobody's going to buy a house where there's an abandoned property," she said, noting that the blight brings in drug dealers and an overall bad element of people. "If I had the money, I'd move." Street said the city is developing a program called Saving Neighborhoods, dedicated to determining the best ways to allocate money to the various neighborhoods throughout Philadelphia. "We are prepared to invest in neighborhoods," Street added. "But if we can't get cooperation from the community, then it doesn't matter what we do."


ANALYSIS: Backcourt experience leads way

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Seniors Michael Jordan and Matt Langel were instrumental in the Quakers' victories this weekend. BOSTON -- Just when the Penn men's basketball team looked like it was going to slip from its undefeated precipice at the top of the Ivy League, just when a blemish from Dartmouth or Harvard seemed imminent, Michael Jordan and Matt Langel extended their hands and rescued the falling Quakers. With Jordan and Langel, Penn escaped bruised but not beaten on its last road trip of the regular season. But without the two senior co-captains, the Quakers' spot atop the league would not look anywhere near as secure. On Friday, Langel prevented an upset loss to Dartmouth by scoring 11 straight Penn points late in the game -- a game in which the Big Green had the lead for almost all of the first 23 minutes. And on Saturday, it was Jordan who played the savior role for Penn by knocking away a pass to Crimson forward Dan Clemente with 1.9 seconds left to foil Harvard's best chance for victory. "Langel and Jordan are a heck of a backcourt," Dartmouth coach Dave Faucher said. But more than that, the two Quakers co-captains are a heck of an experienced backcourt. They have combined to play 209 games in their four years at Penn, and that experienced showed through this weekend. When Dartmouth center Ian McGinnis took a pass from guard Flinder Boyd and hit an easy five-footer with 7:56 remaining on Friday, the Big Green had closed the Penn lead to 52-48 and had the momentum and the home-crowd support on their side. But Langel soon changed that. The Moorestown, N.J., native hit a three-pointer 15 seconds later and would add eight more points in the next 4:39 to put the game out of Dartmouth's reach. In the time it took for Langel to hit a runner, a jump shot, a layup and two foul shots to give the Quakers a safe 13-point cushion with 3:02 left, Dartmouth could only muster a Shaun Gee layup. "[Dartmouth was] not playing a lot of help defense, so if you can get by your man a little bit, it seemed like you had an open opportunity to get a shot at the basket," Langel said. And Langel took advantage of those opportunities like a senior guard should, especially in the second half. He scored 17 of his game-high 23 points in the final 20 minutes. But it wasn't as if the Quakers' two-guard worked all the magic himself on Friday; Jordan had 21 points of his own. Still, it was Langel -- not Jordan -- who rescued Penn in its most pressing moments on Friday. Saturday, however, was a different story. Jordan's stat line was not overly impressive: 14 points, six assists, three turnovers and two rebounds. But Jordan's contributions went far beyond the scope of the stat sheet. Whenever Penn seemed to be losing its grip on the game, Jordan took over. The Quakers jumped out to an early 18-5 lead and looked to be heading toward a rout. But less than four minutes later, Harvard cut the lead to nine and usurped the momentum. Even Langel was riled at this point, as he kicked a chair on the bench after coming out for a breather. Sensing the game was falling apart at the seams, Jordan sewed it back together by driving the length of the court and hitting a 10-foot jump shot. And the Philadelphia native did the same thing again when Harvard took its only lead on a Clemente jump shot with 15:21 remaining. This time Jordan drove for a layup, and Penn regained the lead for good. But Harvard would not go away, and if not for Jordan's great defensive play in the last 10 seconds, the Quakers would have gone back to Philadelphia with their first league loss in a year. Jordan, however, did nearly cost Penn the game with an up-and-down traveling violation with 9.3 seconds left and the Quakers only up by one. But the Penn senior redeemed himself by diving and knocking away a pass from Harvard guard Elliott Prasse-Freeman to an open Clemente with 1.9 seconds left. So instead of an unguarded 15-footer, Clemente had to take an off-balance 25-footer with Langel's hand in his face after the inbounds pass. Clemente missed the shot, and Penn took the six-hour ride back to West Philadelphia unscathed.


W. Hoops stymies Harvard with full-court defensive pressure

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Penn women's basketball coach Kelly Greenberg pulled out her trump card early in the Quakers' 79-66 home win over Harvard Saturday night. The payoff was almost immediate. With Harvard's star point guard and Ivy League assist leader Jennifer Monti on the bench nursing an ankle injury at tipoff, Greenberg ordered the Quakers to begin a tenacious full-court press just minutes into the game. Greenberg had hoped that the added defensive pressure might rattle the nerves of Harvard's less-experienced ball handlers. "None of the guards, because Monti was kind of injured, really like to handle the ball," Greenberg said. "We thought that if we got pressure on them it would really bother them." Her hopes became reality five minutes into the first half, after Penn forward Diana Caramanico hit a free throw to tie the score at nine. Immediately following the shot, the Quakers quickly set themselves into their full-court defense. With the Penn forwards -- including sophomore Julie Epton -- positioned near midcourt, Penn guard Erin Ladley discreetly set herself up behind Harvard guard Lisa Kowal, the target of Crimson guard Bree Kelley's inbounds pass. When the ball was thrown in, Ladley quickly jumped around the unsuspecting Kowal and picked off the ball for the Quakers' first forced turnover of the night off the full-court press. This trend-setting steal was soon thereafter made even more lucrative when a quickly advancing Epton tipped in Ladley's missed layup to put Penn up by two. Nearing the end of the half, the Red and Blue could credit their full-court press with five Harvard turnovers -- including a pair of consecutive backcourt steals in the stanza's final minute, resulting in two unanswered Quakers baskets. "They didn't know what to do against it, and it really got us going," said Penn guard Mandy West, who had two first-half steals in the full-court set up. "It completely changed the momentum, because they couldn't do anything they wanted." The momentum gained for the Quakers by the press -- which helped give them a healthy, 12-point lead at halftime -- also rolled into the second half. Harvard committed four more turnovers in the trap in the second half, for a total of nine in the game. Overall, Harvard made 25 turnovers, and Penn made eight. The press played special importance in the Red and Blue recovering from a 7-0 Crimson run five minutes into the second half that brought Harvard within four points of Penn. After Ladley hit a bank shot midway through the half to end the Crimson run and put Penn up, 53-47, she immediately made a backcourt steal. Unfortunately for the Quakers, though, Ladley's steal did not result in any baskets. It did, however, throw off Harvard's scoring rhythm, and after a minute-long scoring drought for both teams, West ripped the ball from the hands of a Harvard guard in the press, then nailed a fade-away on the baseline to put Penn up 55-47 with 9:06 remaining in the game. Harvard wasn't able to muster another comeback for the rest of the game, instead letting Penn pull away to a 13-point advantage by the end of the game. "I don't think we ever caught a great rhythm," said Monti, who logged in 21 minutes for the Crimson despite her hurt ankle. The success of the full-court press against Harvard prompted questions in the mind of Greenberg whether the defensive tool would have been useful in Penn's 75-71 loss to Dartmouth the previous night. The Quakers' press was virtually non-existent against the speedy Big Green Friday, partly due to the mistakes made in Penn's 89-71 thrashing at the hands of Dartmouth on the road earlier this month. "At Dartmouth we did try to press early, and it gave up wide open layups," Greenberg said. "In the first three minutes we had to get out of it. We learned from that. I don't think we could have pressed again." Big Green coach Chris Weilgus also thought Greenberg was wise to avoid the press against her team on Friday. "I actually like when people press us, because we get a lot of easy shots off the press," she said. This past weekend, the events of which, have placed Penn back in the heat of the Ivy title hunt with three games remaining, has shown Greenberg and her team that their press can definitely be deadly for opponents, but must be used with caution against teams that have the speed and experience to get through the trap. Harvard had neither of these traits when Monti was on the bench, and the Crimson were decidedly overwhelmed by the trump card in the Quakers' strong deck Saturday.


M. Hoops survives scare at Harvard

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Penn held on to win by one at Harvard after beating Dartmouth Friday night. BOSTON -- The boisterous capacity crowd of 2,125 at Lavietes Pavilion was on its feet with 9.3 seconds remaining in the Penn-Harvard men's basketball game on Saturday night. They smelled an upset in the making. After having trailed 56-46 with 6:06 left, the Crimson found themselves with the ball, down one and primed to pull off a major upset in the closing seconds. But Penn (18-7, 11-0 Ivy League) would not allow the Crimson (10-15, 5-7) to mar its perfect Ivy slate. First Ugonna Onyekwe and then Michael Jordan deflected passes out of bounds on the final possession. And when a three-pointer by Harvard's Dan Clemente bounced off the back rim as the buzzer sounded, Penn breathed a sigh of relief, recording its 13th consecutive victory, 62-61. The Quakers had handled Dartmouth (8-16, 4-7) the previous night in Hanover, N.H., 69-55. "We just wanted to keep everybody in front of us and make them take time to get the ball upcourt," Penn coach Fran Dunphy said. "I thought they would run it down right away, but obviously they were looking at something specific. "And Clemente got a shot off, but it really wasn't a very good one." Clemente, who had a game-high 25 points and a trio of three-pointers, tore off his protective goggles in exasperation after his miss. "To be honest, I love that shot," Clemente said. "I got a great look and it felt good leaving my hands and everything, but it just didn't happen." Crimson freshman Elliott Prasse-Freeman dished out 14 assists to complement Clemente's scoring outburst. But Penn was spurred to victory by a balanced offense, with four starters scoring at least 12 points. Nothing, however, came easy for the Quakers on their road trip. Penn had to battle back from a 33-30 halftime deficit to topple Dartmouth on Friday night. Senior guards Matt Langel and Jordan paced the Quakers at Leede Arena with 23 and 21 points respectively, while Shaun Gee led the Big Green with 22. "We were a feisty bunch," said Dartmouth coach Dave Faucher, whose squad recorded eight steals. "We played with such defensive passion every possession. Penn had to earn everything." Penn's nine first-half turnovers helped Dartmouth along on its way to staking its halftime lead. None of the Quakers were immune from these mental errors, as the normally sure-handed Langel had 11 turnovers on the weekend. As a team, the Red and Blue turned the ball over 30 times. And what could have been the season-altering turnover came with less than 10 seconds left at Harvard. Harvard's Damian Long hit a pair of free throws with 23.9 seconds left, and Penn found itself up only 62-61. The Quakers then attempted to play keep-away to run out the clock for as long as possible before being fouled. But Jordan -- who had 35 points, nine assists and eight turnovers on the weekend -- inexplicably traveled without a Harvard defender within five feet of him with 9.3 seconds left. Jordan received a pass from David Klatsky, then, anticipating contact, turned and jumped --Eonly no Harvard defender was in the area, and no Penn player was free to receive a pass. "We just talked about it, and he just thought he had someone on him," Dunphy said. "It was just one of those freak things that never has happened to him before, and I'm sure it will never happen to him again." Both Dunphy and Harvard coach Frank Sullivan then proceeded to call timeouts to prepare for the final play. "There was no question about it, we were going to Clemente. He wanted the ball," Sullivan said. But with Langel desperately shoving a hand in his face, the junior's wobbly shot bounced off the back iron. "Clemente played a terrific game," Sullivan said. "We are proud of our effort -- we took a couple shots from Penn but never got knocked down for the count." The Quakers, visibly relieved, survived the toughest road trip this year. "We have another tough weekend coming up," said Owens, who had a career-high 17 boards at Harvard. "But we had a serious gut-check tonight." The previous night, Penn needed stellar second-half play to ground the pesky Big Green. Langel personally outscored the hosts 11-2 over a 4:54 second-half span to put the game away. "They were not playing a lot of help defense, so if you can get by your man a little bit, it seemed like you had an open opportunity to get a shot at the basket," Langel said. At Dartmouth, the Quakers were helped immensely by five blocks from Onyekwe and three from Owens -- which moved him into first place on Penn's career list with 142. A night later, the Quakers jumped out to an 18-5 lead at Harvard on the strength of five points apiece by Jordan, Owens and Onyekwe. But capitalizing on Penn mistakes -- including six consecutive first-half missed free throws by Owens -- Harvard clawed to a 35-34 lead shortly into the second frame. Fortunately for Penn, the visitors were able to wrest back the lead for good just seconds later on a scrumptious left-handed layup by Jordan. And despite cutting it much closer than they would have liked, the Quakers escaped with the victory to return to Penn still undefeated in Ivy play. News and Notes: With seven blocks this weekend, Onyekwe has 42 for the season. This breaks Owens' freshman record of 40 set in '96-97? Jordan netted 35 points to give him 1,541 for his career. He moved past Jerome Allen into fourth place on Penn's all-time list and needs just 11 points to tie Ron Haigler, who played from 1972-75.


UA cracks down on poor attendance

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Basketball court funding, a new online consulting project and the attendance policy were all on the agenda of the Undergraduate Assembly's meeting last night. And the 25 voting members in attendance passed an amendment stating that members may not miss more than 25 percent of meetings per semester. Under the new amendment, members absent for more than 25 percent of meetings would have the opportunity to submit a letter to the executive board explaining the circumstances of their absences. The board would then have two weeks to review the letter and to vote on the member's standing. "Attendance is far better than it has been in past years, but it has been getting worse," said UA Chairman Michael Silver, a College senior. "It's acknowledging that it needs to be strengthened." A major undertaking unveiled formally at the meeting was "UA Visions," a project conducted through an online survey to gauge Penn students' feelings on all aspects of life at the University. The committee plans to take the results obtained from the survey and compile them in a bound volume to be presented to University President Judith Rodin. "Across the Ivy League, representative bodies are out of touch with the students," UA Secretary Mo Saraiya said. "Dartmouth did [this type of survey] and their president found it invaluable in understanding students' needs." "What we come up with at the end of the survey is something that each person has contributed to," College sophomore David Burd said. "It's an opportunity to play a part in the continuing role of the UA." The UA also intends to send out letters to all members of the incoming freshmen class describing the UA and requesting student information, specifically e-mail addresses, through included return postcards. In their ongoing effort to create more basketball courts, the members passed a motion to allocate $10,000 of the $32,500 UA discretionary fund to the construction of the courts. The vote, unanimously passed, will accompany a campaign to solicit an additional $180,000 needed for the completion of the project. Also passed was a motion to subsidize the four registered presidential campaigns on campus. SAC does not provide funding for student groups affiliated with a political candidate. With a vote of 24 and one abstention, it was decided that $50 would be given each to the Bush, Bradley, Gore and McCain student campaigns for photocopying expenses, totaling $200. In addition, UA leaders also announced that Engineering junior Krista Pohl will replace Jed Fonner, also an Engineering junior, as Engineering representative to the UA. Yesterday's meeting was moved from its usual location at the Terrace Room in Logan Hall because one member did not have a PennCard and could not enter the building. The UA met instead at Harnwell College House.


Mentors stress need for cultural identity

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Mayor John Street and his former political opponent Sam Katz had many disagreements about city politics when they campaigned to be mayor of Philadelphia. But on Friday afternoon, as part of the Jewish Heritage Program's Mentoring Luncheon, the two men found a subject on which they could agree: The need for a stronger cultural identity on college campuses. Street, Katz and Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham were among the featured speakers at Friday's program in the Temple University Center City building, which brought together more than 50 prominent area residents and nearly 200 Jewish students from seven universities in the region -- including Penn. The discussion centered on achieving success after college, making a positive impact upon the world and retaining cultural and religious identities. The meeting's goal, according to its organizers, was to permit personal interaction between students and the local leaders. Many of the leaders had already developed a mentoring relationship with the students as part of JHP. Speakers at the event made it clear that, as mentors to the students, they were willing to assist them to the greatest extent possible in their efforts to retain their Jewish pride and find good internships and jobs. "I'm here to help you find an internship in your field," said Roberta Matz of the Jewish Federation of Philadelphia. "Find the courage to do what you think you want to do, and if you want to change [your job], it's not written in stone." Others sought to connect their Jewish identity to their lives and occupations. "I don't know how all of this relates to the workplace directly, but I try to bring a warm, Yiddish feel to work to share with others," said Elaine Wilner, the public relations director of Penn's School of Arts and Sciences. The luncheon began with a buffet and was then followed by a series of speakers. Afterward, students separated into sessions with their respective schools, in which they discussed the program, its impact upon them and other related topics. JHP is a regional campus outreach organization targeted at Jewish students not involved in activities associated with Judaism on their college campuses. Founded in 1993 at Penn, JHP provides mentoring for more than 5,000 students on 11 campuses and attracts more than 21,000 attendees to its annual events. "I wish there was a program like this when I was younger," remarked David Schwartz, a mentor in the program.


Law dean could be named this week

(02/28/00 10:00am)

University officials have said the announcement of the new dean of the Law School is 'imminent' after a 15-month search. The end of the exhaustive 15-month search for the next dean of the Law School may be in sight. In fact, an announcement is "imminent," top University officials have said during the past week. But while it seems likely that an announcement will come as soon as this week, "imminent," as Penn administrators have used it, can mean anywhere from two days to two months. Law School Dean Search Committee Chairman Richard Herring, who is also the vice dean of the Wharton School, said last Tuesday that he expected to hear an announcement by the end of the week. But with President Clinton visiting campus and repercussions from the ouster of William Kelley as Health System chief and Medical School dean still being felt, the week came and went without an announcement. And in an interview last week, University President Judith Rodin said she did not know when a decision would be made public. Since January, University officials have said the process was coming to an end and an announcement would be forthcoming. "I expect to hear a decision from the president and provost in the next few weeks," Herring said in January, after his committee had submitted its final list of candidates to Rodin and Provost Robert Barchi at the end of the fall semester. And when Patrick Harker was named the dean of Wharton in early February -- drawing that 14-month search to a close -- other Penn officials said they believed that the Law School dean would be announced by the University Trustees meetings on February 17. But that was before Kelley's dismissal, and some administrators have said that after more than a year of searching, the University would hardly want the announcement to be overshadowed by other campus events. As the process has dragged on since November 1998, members of the search committee have remained extremely tight-lipped, revealing few details and refusing to confirm any names. In recent months, Law professors Heidi Hurd and Michael Fitts have surfaced as potential candidates. Rodin, Herring and all search committee members have refused to confirm whether or not either was on the list of finalists or was even a candidate. They have also refused to discuss whether candidates on the final list were external or internal, saying only that the committee considered both. The Law School is currently headed by Interim Dean Charles Mooney, who has been serving in that capacity since Colin Diver stepped down from the position last summer. Diver announced his resignation in October 1998 after 10 years as leader of the school.


A cappella concert benefits local kids

(02/28/00 10:00am)

The several dozen students who ventured into the Sigma Alpha Epsilon House Thursday night came to hear some of Penn's most popular a cappella groups. Whether they knew it or not, they also wound up giving to charity in the process. Putting a fun twist on philanthropy, SAE, the Office of the Vice Provost for University Life and the Children's Miracle Network joined forces to sponsor a benefit concert for area underprivileged children. The non-alcoholic event, entitled "Philanthropy 101," drew as many as 150 students packed into the main room of the SAE house. The benefit concert showcased performances by Penn Masala, Pennsylvania Six-5000, Counterparts, Save the Empire -- a house band made up of SAE pledges -- and guest DJ Paul the Apostle. College sophomore Jason Dudas, the fraternity's philanthropy chair, explained that the benefit concert was part of SAE's revitalized community service program. "CMN and SAE are nationally connected. Each SAE chapter works for and donates to its local CMN office. This is our first year -- first of many we hope," Dudas said. CMN subsidizes health care for underprivileged children around the nation. The Philadelphia branch works closely with the nearby Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The night started off with P.M. Dawn's "Set Adrift on Memory Bliss," -- Penn Masala style -- with English and Hindi vocals intertwined. "We feel it's really important to help out all the organizations on campus who are working towards charitable causes," said College junior Veeral Rathod, a Penn Masala member. Penn Six amused the crowd with its own version of Smashmouth's "All-Star," parodying the Greek system and social scene. But though the group's performance was light in style, its motive for playing was far more serious. "We think the mission of the CMN is an admirable one," said College sophomore Mark Hannah, a Penn Six member and SAE brother. "We hope to make at least a little bit of a difference in the lives of children." Counterparts entertained the audience with such classics as Van Morrison's "Crazy Love" and the Divinyls' "I Touch Myself." "We really try to go out and do community-oriented performances -- it's our way of giving back to Penn and the community," said College junior and Counterparts President Matt Lintner. Dudas estimated the event was expected to raise between $500 to $600.


Two hurt in off-campus shooting

(02/28/00 10:00am)

The Saturday shooting was preceded by an armed robbery at the Moravian Cafes a few hours earlier. University and Philadelphia police have their hands full this morning as they continue their investigations into an off-campus shooting early Saturday morning and an armed robbery at the Moravian Cafes food court hours earlier. According to University Police officials, two men traveling in a car were shot on the 3800 block of Market Street at around 12:25 a.m. on Saturday. One victim was taken to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, while the other was sent to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Neither victim is believed to be affiliated with the University. According to University Police Deputy Chief of Investigations Tom King, both men were resting in stable condition as of last night. Although King was unsure of the exact nature of the injuries, he said he believed one victim was shot in the face and the other sustained a leg wound. Witnesses told police that five black men wearing dark clothing fled the scene, which is located near the First District Plaza on the northwest corner of 38th and Market streets. Both University and Philadelphia police patrols rushed to the area in what King called a "major response." Penn detectives are joining their Philadelphia counterparts in the investigation. King said he did not know how many shots were fired, but he did note that there were "numerous" shell casings at the scene. "We're involved in a joint investigation [with Philadelphia Police]," King said. "We're doing a lot of interviews right now." King declined to comment further on the status of the investigation. Saturday's incident marks the second shooting in the 38th Street area in just the past week. Last Monday, a man unaffiliated with the University was shot in the stomach outside the Pegasus Showcase nightclub at 3801 Chestnut Street. "There is no reason to believe the shootings are related at this time," King said. "Naturally, though, we're concerned," he added. In the weekend's other major incident, two employees at the Moravian Cafes food court, located at 3409 Walnut Street, were robbed at gunpoint shortly after closing on Friday night. According to University Police, two employees of Eat at Joe's Express were confronted at a rear service entrance at around 10 p.m. on Friday by two men, one who was carrying a gun. The suspects, who were both wearing dark ski masks at the time of the robbery, made off with over $1,600 from the establishment. Neither victim was physically injured during the robbery, though Eat at Joe's Express Manager Ken Gilliam said last night that the two employees continue to be "extremely shaken-up" by the incident. "Both were supposed to work yesterday and today, but they just couldn't do it," Gilliam said on Sunday. Gilliam, who was not present during the robbery, explained that the employees were completing paperwork after closing time and were confronted by the armed men as they tried to leave through the rear exit. The door, which leads into the main part of the kiosk, was pried open, Gilliam said. "[The robbers] waited until everyone left, then entered at the service entrance," Gilliam speculated. Spectaguards routinely patrol the food court, but Gilliam complained that no security officers were present on the night of the robbery -- a situation Gilliam labeled as a "consistent problem." "They're here during the day, but at nighttime, when the chains are on the [main] doors, they leave," Gilliam said. He explained that after meeting with Spectaguard officials following the robbery, security has been stationed at the food court both during the day and at night. "Unfortunately, they reacted to an event that already happened," Gilliam said. Gilliam added that he plans to contact officials from Trammell Crow -- the company that manages most of the University's properties, including the Moravian Cafes -- to explain the situation. Friday's armed robbery is not the first at the 3401 Walnut retail complex this year. On November 8, two masked gunmen entered Mad 4 Mex and herded three employees into a locked meat freezer, eventually making off with over $1,500 in cash. The case remains unsolved.


Student center's opening delayed

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Perelman Quad will now open in late July due to construction problems. The completion of the $87 million Perelman Quadrangle project will be delayed until late July because of problems obtaining construction materials, according to University officials. Penn administrators originally said the entire project -- which encompasses Logan, College, Williams and Houston halls, and Irvine Auditorium -- would be fully operational before the Class of 2000 graduates in May. But the University is waiting for the arrival from Italy of marble for the floors in Houston Hall and will not finish the building until the end of July, according to Tom Hauber, who will manage Perelman Quadrangle upon its completion. "The delay was in the approval of the [marble] samples that were sent to us," Hauber added. Work on Irvine, Logan and Williams has already been completed. Houston Hall and Wynn Common, the landscaped corridor linking Perelman Quad's buildings, are the two parts of the project remaining. Wynn Common should be open by May 15, Hauber said. While completion dates for Perelman Quad have been pushed back several times already, officials said this deadline will have to be met because CUPID will be held in Houston Hall this September. "We have actually scheduled CUPID into Houston Hall? with the feeling that it would be nice to have freshmen come into their student union as their first [Penn] experience," Executive Director of University Life Facilities John Smolen said. Different parts of the Perelman project have been finishing up over the past year. A fully renovated Irvine was unveiled to the public last September and the Silfen Study Center and Cafe in Williams Hall also debuted in the fall. Logan Hall and College Hall both underwent extensive renovations, which finished about two years ago. Two large grand staircases will lead from Logan Hall into Wynn Common, which will provide space for about 1,250 students and will also have a fully functional stage at the opposite end, Hauber said. Once complete, Houston Hall will house a dining area, card and copy shop, game room, offices, classrooms and space for undergraduate and graduate student clubs. Many of the rooms in Houston Hall will be open for named donations. Approximately 20 spaces within Perelman Quad will bear donors names. Hauber said donations ranged from $50,000 to $150,000. The dining area, which will seat about 450 and is known as the "Houston Market," will be administered by Bon Appetit, the corporation that manages University dining halls. Located on the lowest level of Houston Hall, it will be divided into several counters with various food options, including a grill area, pizza and pasta, international cuisine and pre-packaged foods, Hauber said. Also located on the bottom floor will be a news, copy, card and gift shop. Smolen said the University is working with Arnold Bank, who runs stores in the Gallery at Market East and the Shoppes at Liberty Place, to operate the shop and determine what products it will carry. Rounding up the basement offerings will be a game room and movie screen, officials said. The game room will be double the size it was before Houston Hall's renovations and will be run by American Vending of Marlton, N.J. "They run very high-tech, Dave and Buster type areas," Smolen said. "It's not the old kind of game room -- it's really pretty sophisticated." Houston Hall's first floor will feature a staffed reception desk, lounge space and an area tentatively called the "Bistro." "It'll be the morning place to be if you want coffee, you want donuts, you want croissants and so on," Hauber said of the space, which will offer table service later in the day.


Worth the cost?

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Prestigious diploma not key to success Two college graduates are interviewing for a job. One is from a highly selective school, the other is from a no-name one. Who gets hired? According to a recent study conducted by the the National Bureau of Economic Research, the student from the more prestigious school won't necessarily be a shoo-in. Basing the selectivity of an institution on the average SAT score of its students, researchers found that intelligent, hard-working people will succeed in the job market regardless of the school they attend. "The study showed that students who go to a more selective college do tend to have higher paying jobs, but it appears that it's not caused by the fact that they attended more selective colleges," said Alan Krueger, the study's co-author and a Princeton University Economics professor. "It appears that students who attend highly selective schools are highly motivated going into college? and would attain high-paying jobs regardless," he added. The study did find, however, that students from disadvantaged backgrounds do benefit from attending well-known schools, which can provide them with contacts they might otherwise not have had. Krueger and co-author Stacy Berg Dale, a researcher at the Arthur W. Mellon Foundation, based their findings on two separate studies -- the College and Beyond Survey and the National Longitudinal Survey of the High School Class of 1972. The College and Beyond Survey includes information about the labor market outcomes in 1995 for students who graduated in 1980 from highly selective and less-selective colleges and universities nationwide. The National Longitudinal Survey shows the correlations among the incomes of students who entered college in 1972, the average SAT scores of all the schools to which they applied and the average SAT scores of the schools they attended. Krueger noted that the survey results should not deter students from attending costly schools, as there are many factors to take into account when choosing which college or university to attend. "For example, if a student is interested in business, he is better off going to a school that specializes in business, like Wharton," Krueger added. According to Penn Career Services Director Patricia Rose, the prospect of finding a well-paid job is only one of several reasons why students come to a top school like Penn. Many students choose Penn for "the richness of the intellectual experience [and] the opportunity to study with outstanding faculty, to live with very smart, very interesting classmates," she said. Caren Lissner, who received her bachelor's degree in English from Penn in 1993 and now is the managing editor of the Hudson Reporter Newspaper Group in New Jersey, agreed. "Being with smart people and with very intelligent professors? is more important than getting out and making a lot of money," Lissner said. "I think that people get can out of a school what they put into it." However, she pointed out that graduating from a prestigious school like Penn does make a difference, despite the study's results. "It is unfortunate, but I think the name [of a school] plays a role," Lissner said. "Sometimes people are judged by where they went to school." But 1986 Penn graduate Henry Kahwaty, who earned his doctoral degree in Economics in 1991 and is now employed as an economist at the Washington, D.C.-based Navigant Consulting, said he is not particularly concerned with where potential employees earned their degrees. "They really have to know economics," Kahwaty said. "But schools with the most rigorous economic programs like Penn and Vanderbilt have the most successful students, and we certainly see a difference in the qualities of candidates."


Students jazz to Puente's beat

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Hundreds of Penn students and Philadelphia residents saw why Tito Puente is known as "El Rey" of Latin music on Saturday night. In two back-to-back concerts at the Zellerbach Theatre in the Annenberg Center, Puente dazzled filled-to-capacity crowds with his brilliant percussion, catchy Latin rhythms and flamboyant movements. Puente had initially been scheduled to play only one show. Another one was added three weeks ago after the original 8 p.m. concert sold out. Michael Rose, director of Penn Presents, said he booked Puente last April because he wanted a Latin jazz icon. The audience greeted him with a standing ovation as he took the stage, as well as after his encore. Both audiences saw the fast footwork of Eddie Torres and his New York City-based Latin dance troupe. But those who attended the second show received a special treat, as Puente was joined by his good friend Bill Cosby, who provided added comic relief on top of Puente's act. Between numbers, Puente joked with the crowd as if his real calling was as a comedian. Cosby came onstage as a featured trumpet player during the 10:30 p.m. show, but was cut off by the band each time he tried to play. "I just started this afternoon," Cosby said after the show. He gave up the trumpet, resorting to singing with rolled R's, dancing salsa and finally settling on playing the cowbell. By the end of the night, Cosby was banging on Puente's drums and imitating his trademark arm movements and facial expressions. Cosby was invited to the show by Harold Haskins, director for Student Development and Planning in the Office of the Vice Provost for University Life. Haskins is also Cosby's personal friend from their days in North Philadelphia 35 years ago. Haskins said he knew of Cosby's and Puente's friendship and wanted to add another dimension to the event. "There needs to be a better understanding of diversity," Haskins said. "One reason why Cosby came is that he understands that African-American Latin jazz is a blend." He emphasized that Cosby was not paid for his appearance in the 10:30 p.m. show. "He drove on his own from New Brunswick, and then back to New York, to be here tonight." Haskins noted the importance of the diversity in the crowd. "This is a major kind of impact, with the community and the students." Indeed, many audience members were not Penn students but area residents. Some even traveled from New York to hear the show. Jessica Rodriguez, a junior at nearby Central High School, said she particularly liked Puente's unique style of music. "Salsa in the U.S. was a mixture through New York. [Puente] incorporated the Latin rhythms on African drums and the big band of New York," Rodriguez said. After the opening number, Puente was honored by Enrique Conde, president of the Cuban-American Undergraduate Student Community.


Gymnastics wins its fourth straight Ivy Classic crown

(02/28/00 10:00am)

The Quakers rebounded from early difficulties to take their seventh title in the last decade. Some fairy tales aren't even this sweet. At Saturday's Ivy Classic in Ithaca, N.Y., the Penn gymnastics team recovered from a rocky start and earned an Ivy Classic record 189.300 points, winning an unprecedented fourth consecutive Classic championship. The win was the Quakers' seventh in the past decade. "This meet came down to who wanted it the most and did whatever they could to win," Penn senior Becky Nadler said. Beginning with an uncharacteristically shaky fourth-place performance on balance beam -- usually the Red and Blue's strongest event -- the Quakers knew they would have to work to get back to first place. "We had to count two falls in the team score, which put our backs in the corner," Penn coach Tom Kovic said. "I didn't know how the other teams were scoring, but the message remained that we had to do our best." From that point on, the Quakers did not look back. "We shook off the mistakes with so much focus and determination. We just kept fighting harder and harder, until bars, which is usually a shaky event for us, was absolutely fantastic," Penn senior Kirby Thorpe said. One of the most outstanding efforts of the afternoon was turned in by Penn sophomore Sarah Tudryn, who earned her second consecutive Ivy Classic individual title on the uneven bars with a score of 9.725. "Sarah had a great day. She totally stepped up on beam [for sophomore Jean Troast, who was ill], and on vault [for junior Kelly Haberer, injured with a sprained foot ligament] and then in her own right on bars, which she won," Thorpe said. Becky Nadler earned the individual championship in balance beam, with a score of 9.750, adding to the title she won at the 1998 Classic in the floor exercises. "I was pleased with my performance as an individual at my last Ivy Championship. We all try to do our best for the team," Nadler said. To add to the fairy-tale quality of the meet, Penn's Haberer overcame the injury to her foot and turned in a solid performance. "Kelly did a great job. She came in on Monday [to practice] on crutches and not only did she compete on Saturday, but her score helped to lead the team. Her effort was monumental," Kovic said. From top to bottom, the entire line-up contributed to the final team victory for the Quakers. "We are proud to be Ivy champs. Not everything went perfectly, but we did not give up, still turned in a great team score and won the meet -- all requiring us to pull together as a team in a way I think only we know how to do," Penn captain Lizzie Jacobson said. In the end, with only a margin of 2.050 points separating the first-place Quakers and the fourth-place Brown Bears, the meet was not decided until the winner was announced. "There aren't many moments during other meets that can compare to the one we had when we were announced as the winners. It was unbelievable," Nadler said. The Quakers hope to use the classic as a foundation for continued success for the rest of the season, as well as the ECAC Championships, taking place in March. "To start shaky on our best event and pull through and focus and win proved what a mentally strong team we are," Penn freshman Veena Abraham said. And the Quakers finally have their first win on the road, a victory that has been eluding them all season. "As far as competing on the road, this is definitely a confidence booster. The season wasn't going as well as I had anticipated because of the close [away] losses to Cornell and Yale," Kovic said. "But the fact that we were so consistent was definitely a testament to the strength of this team." For now, the Quakers are looking forward to celebrating their hard-fought championship and training for Saturday's home meet against Wilson College. "This win helped to boost our confidence but we still have room for improvement, and that's what we'll be working on until then," Abraham said. The Ivy Classic championship trophy is back in Philadelphia. Still.


W. Hoops still alive after split

(02/28/00 10:00am)

Penn lost to Dartmouth on Friday night but handled Harvard one night later. The Penn women's basketball team took a wild amusement park ride over the weekend that was filled with enough twists, turns, ups and downs to make the most experienced rider sick. Then, as if they were on a real roller coaster, the Quakers came to rest exactly where they had begun, tied with Harvard one game behind Ivy League-leading Dartmouth. After Penn (17-8, 8-3 Ivy League) came up four points short against Dartmouth on Friday in a game which Penn coach Kelly Greenberg had called "the most important in the history of the program," the Quakers bounced back the next night to beat the Crimson (15-8, 8-3), 79-66. "Welcome to the Ivy League," Harvard coach Kathy Delaney-Smith said. "I love it, you've got to love it. Any coach in the Ivy League that puts undefeated as their goal is crazy." Delaney-Smith loves it because Dartmouth (17-7, 9-2) was upset by Princeton on Saturday night. Specifically, the Big Green's loss gives Harvard a renewed chance to contend for the Ivy League title. If the Crimson win all of their remaining games -- including their season finale at Dartmouth on March 7 -- they will clinch at least a tie for the championship. The Quakers, meanwhile, must win all of their games and have Dartmouth lose one to tie for the title. Penn never had a lead over the Big Green, in part because of Dartmouth point guard Courtney Banghart, who converted her first four three-point attempts, hit 5-of-7 from downtown in the first half and finished the game with 21 points. "The first six minutes of the game killed us," Greenberg said. "You can't let a Banghart come out and shoot threes like that, and we did. We knew that's what she could do, and it's just very disappointing that we let her do it. It's not a team where you can play catch-up very easily." Although Dartmouth coach Chris Weilgus said that her team had wanted to stop Penn's inside game, junior forward Diana Caramanico had virtually free rein, as she hit 13 out of 15 field goals and ended the night with a game-high 29 points. But it wasn't enough, as the Quakers, who were trailing by less than five points virtually the entire game, could never catch the Big Green. "We were tied or down by two for such long periods of time, and we just didn't take advantage of it," Caramanico said. "That's what really hurts about this loss, I know we can be a better team than them. We just didn't capitalize on the opportunities they gave us." All told, the Quakers were within striking distance -- down by three or less -- for a full 14 minutes over the course of the game. However, Penn's 21 turnovers all too often ruined any chance to tie or take the lead. One two-minute stretch in particular was especially frustrating for the Quakers. From the 2:15 to the 15-second mark, the Quakers were down by three, and neither team was able to score until Dartmouth freshman Katherine Hanks hit one free throw with 15.1 seconds remaining to put the game virtually out of reach. All this came after senior guard Mandy West led a furious Quakers comeback from 10 points down. West hit two three-pointers, had a three-point play and outscored the Big Green 9-2 in a one-minute stretch toward the end of the game. "Credit Mandy, she got good looks, and she just shot real well," Weilgus said. "We knew she was a great player, but we just made our free throws down the stretch and time ran out on them." West's own coach also raved about her performance. "The girl's just tough," Greenberg said. "I've said it all year. If all of us could be as tough and gutsy as Mandy is all the time, we'd get all over people. She comes right back, she doesn't put her head down, she never stops." The Quakers didn't keep their heads down for long. As the Quakers welcomed Harvard to the Palestra on Saturday, they were greeted by an unusual sight -- fans, lots of them. "There were people everywhere, I couldn't believe it," Caramanico said. "I really want to thank all the fans that came out to our game. That really made a difference. I've never played in the Palestra with this many people." The Quakers drew record crowds all weekend, as they broke 1,000 fans for the first time against Dartmouth and smashed that record the next night, drawing 2,200 for the Harvard game. And the Red and Blue did not disappoint, as the game was almost a carbon copy of the previous night's contest -- except this one ended in Penn's favor. Caramanico led the Quakers for the second straight night, with 31 points, and her co-captain, West, ended with 22. "Penn's a great team. They have the two best players in the league," Delaney-Smith said. "[Caramanico and West] are tremendous players, and they stepped it up tonight and played a great game." On this night, the Crimson had only one lead the entire game and committed 25 turnovers, which was the main reason for the Penn win. That, and they came out angry. "I think the team was focused," Greenberg said. "Di and Mandy couldn't wait to get on the floor. I just felt like we had the game the whole time." But that confidence didn't stop Greenberg -- who is never shy in voicing her opinion to the officiating crew -- from drawing a technical foul midway through the second half. "I was showing the ref how to count three seconds," she said. "He wasn't too pleased with me."


Alumna returns to Penn as a success

(02/25/00 10:00am)

Rebecca Matthias spent her undergraduate years at Penn convinced she would one day be an architect. But after a startling realization in, of all places, a women's clothing store, Matthias found her true calling. Today, Matthias is the chief operating officer of Mothers Work Inc., a $300 million publicly owned company that manufactures and sells maternity ware in a variety of price and style ranges. A 1975 College graduate, Matthias addressed more than 25 College students yesterday in Logan Hall as part of the Robert Fox Lessons in Leadership Program. Matthias discussed the history and future of her company as she guided the audience through a brief Powerpoint presentation. She told the students the idea for her company came to her while shopping for business maternity clothing. "If I was having trouble finding clothes, I figured others probably were too," Matthias said. So, in 1982, she and her husband -- who serves as the chief executive officer of the company -- spearheaded the creation of the Pennsylvania-based specialty clothing corporation. Speaking of the struggles she had to endure during the first 10 years of building her business, Matthias named perseverance as the one quality that kept her going. The difficulties ranged from finding enough time for both her domestic life and her career as well as learning the simple tricks of the trade. "I wish I'd gone to Wharton," Matthias joked, as most of the audience laughed loudly and School of Arts and Sciences Dean Samuel Preston raised his hands in protest. "Balancing a family and a career is still an impossible task for women," she said. "You have to make a choice for yourself, what do you want out of your life." Matthias encouraged the audience members to take the leap into starting their own businesses, calling it "challenging, to take nothing and make something out of it." She spoke fondly of her years at Penn, describing them as "four years of experimentation" because she participated in a variety of activities -- she joined the women's squash team and played cello in the Penn Orchestra -- in which she always wanted to get involved. "I gained a lot of confidence here." Chuck Brutsche, the associate director of the Lessons in Leadership series, said Matthias was an ideal speaker because "she's made a leadway since she's graduated." Several students in the audience, almost all of which was female, said they liked that Matthias offered applicable real-life advice. "I liked that she recognized she had to make sacrifices with her children, but that she could teach them as a role model," College senior Kim Bardy said. "Her wandering entrepreneur spirit doesn't just apply to business. It applies to life in general," College sophomore Henry Brigham said. "It illustrates how low and high you can go and still laugh at it later." Last week, Martin Franklin, chief executive officer of Marlin Holdings Inc., returned to campus to be the first speaker of the semester. University President Judith Rodin is scheduled to speak in two weeks. "This series gives students a perspective of what it's like 20, 30 years out of school," Preston said. "[Matthias is] clearly a wonderful leader in her field."


Students impressed with Clinton speech

(02/25/00 10:00am)

Many praised the president's charisma and ability to make complex issues easy to understand. He leaped over theater seats. He edged his way through hordes of anxious audience members. And in the end, College junior Cam Winton got exactly what he wanted: a chance to ask a question of President Clinton. "I asked for his advice for any aspiring politician," said Winton, a member-at-large on the executive board of the Student Committee on Undergraduate Education. "He said that I should work in campaigns, talk to a lot of people who are different than I am and know exactly why I want to run and be able to articulate that to people," Winton said. "It's good advice coming from the man himself." Like 400 other Penn undergraduates, Winton's brush with the chief executive came yesterday afternoon during Clinton's address on "The New Economy" in Irvine Auditorium. Kicking off the new Granoff Forum on International Development and the Global Economy, Clinton spent the better part of two hours at Penn, shaking hands and speaking with the throngs of students, faculty members and guests who flocked to greet him after his 35-minute speech. Student audience members -- who were invited to the event through the School of Arts and Sciences' International Relations program, the Political Science Department and the Lauder Institute -- responded to the president's speech with overwhelming enthusiasm. "It was a good speech," College sophomore Catherine Cho said. "I thought I wouldn't understand anything because I'm not into politics or anything, but he laid it out well." Cho wasn't the only one impressed with Clinton's ability to communicate complex economic concepts in understandable terms. "He laid everything out really fundamentally and made everything easy to understand," College sophomore Raymond Chin said. The president -- who arrived at the event slightly late because of a delayed White House departure -- was introduced by speeches from Philadelphia Mayor John Street, University President Judith Rodin and 1980 College graduate Michael Granoff, who is sponsoring the new lecture series. But for those in attendance, the real highlight of the afternoon was the chance to see the president display his much-celebrated public speaking skills. "I thought he was great," College junior Lauren Sierchio said. "He's so charismatic and I think he makes everything sound so exciting and wonderful." "The president has a very powerful presence in the room," College sophomore Jamie Dufresne added. "I was impressed with his policy on economics and how inclusive it was of technology." In a year when Penn has been graced with the presence of such dynamic speakers as former Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and real estate magnate Donald Trump, Clinton drew perhaps the widest praise for his delivery and insight. "[Clinton's speech was] excellent," Wharton senior and former SCUE Chairman Aaron Fidler said. "He's already proven himself to be a great speechmaker, but I thought he did an excellent job here and touched on a lot of very relevant issues." "I think regardless of what you think of the president's views politically, everyone realizes his abilities as a politician," Senior Class President and College Republicans Chairwoman Lisa Marshall said. "I thought it was a good speech. He interjects a lot of personality into it and he's an intriguing speaker." And while the large majority of students saw Clinton only from their Irvine Auditorium seats, several members of Penn College Democrats had a unique opportunity to experience the president's visit from a different angle -- the presidential motorcade. These students -- four from Penn and six from nearby Swarthmore College -- served as volunteers for the presidential visit, driving motorcade vans, meeting with staff officials and even getting their own car in the line of vehicles from the airport. But while the other vehicles were labeled with signs indicating "press," "security," or other functions, the College Democrats' automobile was assigned another title -- "straggler." "We got to see a lot of cool things," College sophomore and College Democrats Vice President Christy Gressman said. "We got to ride in the motorcade through Philly and we got to meet the president and take a picture with him. So it was a fascinating experience and I think I learned a lot."