Search Results


Below are your search results. You can also try a Basic Search.




St. Joe's shocks No. 5 Owls at Palestra

(03/01/00 10:00am)

Temple had a chance to tie as the clock ran out, but St. Joseph's pulled off an enormous Big 5 upset. Jubilant basketball fans stormed the Palestra floor last night after the home team won its biggest game of the year. No, the Penn Quakers did not clinch the Ivy League title. It was the St. Joseph's Hawks who defeated No. 5 Temple, 62-59. The victory was the Hawks' (12-14, 1-3 Big 5) first in four attempts in Big 5 play this season and St. Joe's coach Phil Martelli's first win in his 10 attempts against legendary Owls coach John Chaney. "I love Philadelphia fans," Martelli began his press conference after being mobbed on the court. "What we wanted to try to do was give the players a special moment. I told them that if we played like the way we talked about the other day, they'd be the lead story on SportsCenter, and now they will be. "And it's not about me -- I wanted it for my team." St. Joe's converted 35 percent of its shots from behind the three-point arc to defeat Temple's (22-5, 3-1) vaunted matchup zone from the outside. The biggest shot of the game came off the hands of Hawks senior Tim Brown with 2:03 remaining, putting the home team up, 60-57. Temple's Mark Karcher hit a jumper 26 seconds later to bring the score to 60-59, but that was as close as the Owls would get. "It was a tough game," said Karcher, who had 16 points. "We struggled the whole game, and they outplayed us. It was a wake-up call -- we knew it was coming." Karcher missed a jumper with 40 seconds left, and Hawks guard Na'im Crenshaw made two free throws with 16.7 seconds on the clock to provide the final margin. With St. Joe's fans standing in anticipation of victory, Karcher attempted an off-balance trey just seconds before the buzzer -- but it went long, and the crowd erupted. "It seemed like it was in slow motion -- that last shot," said Martelli, who will give his team off from practice today. "Yeah, it was the shot we wanted," Chaney said. "It was probably the only pattern that we had that worked, and they worked it well. We got jammed up on one side with Quincy [Wadley] being doubled, but he finally got it back to Pepe [Sanchez], who hit Mark in the corner who sat down on it. "Of course, he didn't make it, but there are games we're going to have like that where when you depend so much on your shooting. But Martelli's team played extremely well." The victory snapped a four-game skid for St. Joe's and ended the Owls' 13-game winning streak. It also touched off quite a loud celebration. "Aw man, it's something to have the crowd rush you like that," said Hawks guard Marvin O'Connor, who led all scorers with 20 points. Early on, it was apparent that the Owls were not playing like the team that had defeated No. 1 Cincinnati just a week ago. Temple point guard Pepe Sanchez committed an uncharacteristic three turnovers in the first half. And despite outshooting the Hawks 44 percent to 35 percent from the field in the first 20 minutes, the Owls found themselves down 35-30 at the break. "We didn't play the game the way I'd like to see it," Chaney said. "I think Pepe must have had three or four turnovers, and trying to do the wrong thing with the ball. That was bad, and that is uncharacteristic of him. "Bad judgment. But he's so good that he sees guys and he says, 'Well, I'm going to look at them until they get open.' That's bullshit. You can't look at a guy [defender] and say, 'Shazam' -- disappear." St. Joe's extended its lead to 47-34 with 13:51 remaining following a three-pointer by Bill Phillips, and the Owls appeared to be on the verge of folding. But Temple modified its defense to a full-court press and forced four turnovers in the next five minutes. With the Owls fans on their feet, Temple center Lamont Barnes hit a jumper from the left baseline with 8:25 remaining to knot the score at 49. Martelli recounted the ensuing play that gave St. Joe's the lead for good, 51-49. "What happened then was a dribble drive by Marvin [O'Connor]. That helped us out a lot. We took the biggest punch they could give us and came back," he said. Damian Reid and Crenshaw had ten points apiece for the Hawks, who were 11-of-32 from three-point range. The Owls were led by Karcher's 16 and 11 more from Lynn Greer. As a team, however, they hit only 5-for-18 from behind the arc. Temple, much to Chaney's chagrin, also failed to exploit the fact that St. Joe's was in the double-bonus with nine minutes left. The Owls shot just two free throws the rest of the way. "For every foul, we're shooting two, and we should have been at the line every time down the floor. And we weren't," Chaney said. "That to me is the most annoying thing in all of basketball, when I see people who play with their ass and not with their head." St. Joe's hosted this Atlantic 10 meeting at the Palestra -- its fourth "home" game of the season in Penn's fabled arena. The Hawks had previously defeated South Carolina at the Palestra, while falling to Rutgers and La Salle. The excitement of the game vastly overshadowed the memorable halftime ceremony, in which seven players were inducted into the Big 5 Hall of Fame. The honorees included Villanova star and NBA Hall of Famer Paul Arizin, La Salle great Tom Gola -- who is also in the Basketball Hall of Fame and for whom the Explorers' arena was recently named -- and Penn's own Ernie Beck. Beck, the Quakers' all-time leading scorer, notched 1,827 points over three seasons at Penn and led the Red and Blue to a 62-21 record in his time in West Philadelphia. Though he later went on to play for the Philadelphia Warriors, he maintains a special place in his heart for Penn basketball and the Palestra. "I don't know how many of the young people here remember us, but it's nice to be back in the Palestra," Beck said. "It's the same roof and the same place. I love the Palestra -- great place to play basketball."


Notebook: Lucky Seven: Smaller rotation for M. Hoops

(03/01/00 10:00am)

Over the course of the roller-coaster 1999-2000 campaign, Penn men's basketball coach Fran Dunphy has experimented with a variety of lineups and offensive sets. At different points this winter, 12 Quakers have seen significant playing time, but in Hanover, N.H., and in Boston this past weekend, Dunphy shortened his bench and went with a seven-man rotation. One of the beneficiaries of this move was freshman guard David Klatsky, who averaged 26 minutes per game on this road trip. "Klatsky has been in there -- you saw him a lot tonight," Dunphy said following Penn's 62-61 win at Harvard. "He's a good player, David is. We need him in there to run our offense like we need it to run." On the season, Klatsky has an assist-to-turnover ratio of 1.8-to-1 -- a better rate than seniors Michael Jordan or Matt Langel. · Late in Saturday's game at Harvard, Penn men's basketball forward Ugonna Onyekwe went down to the floor in pain after taking an inadvertent blow to the face from Harvard star Dan Clemente. The freshman kneeled on the floor for several minutes before heading to the bench to get his bearings. "Clemente was wearing goggles, and he dipped down and when he was coming up, it caught me right between my eyes," said Onyekwe, who is averaging 11.2 points per game. "It took me out for a little bit, but then I shook it off and I was OK. "I had to go back in anyways." But Penn fans need not have worried -- the 6'8" power forward returned just 41 seconds later and notched a dunk and a layup in the final minutes of play. · Penn is on course to clinch its second consecutive Ivy League title and NCAA berth this Saturday at home against Yale. While the Princeton game Tuesday at the Palestra will be packed, tickets are still available for what could be a pair of equally raucous celebrations this weekend. And the Quakers need all the fan support they can get. "I think it will give us a real good advantage and help us to push through these last few games if the fans are really vocal and intimidating the opposition," Onyekwe said. "We really want to focus and finish off strong these last few games. "So definitely that will be a big advantage to us if the fans are loud and come out in great large numbers to support us." Langel, who watched St. Joe's fans storm the Palestra floor after the Hawks defeated Temple last night, reflected on the response of Penn fans in big games of the recent past. "When we beat Temple last year, they stormed the court," Langel said. "And last year the fans celebrated on the floor after the Cornell game at home. As players, we didn't really feel like that was a time for us to celebrate, so we didn't celebrate -- but the fans do what the fans want to do." · Last night at a special halftime ceremony at the Palestra, seven former basketball players had their numbers inducted into the Big 5 Hall of Fame. The honorees included Penn's all-time leading scorer, Ernie Beck. And while Beck has been out of Penn basketball for almost five decades, he still keeps up on some aspects of Quakers hoops. "I know Fran [Dunphy] very well, and I'm pushing hard for them," Beck said. "They had a great weekend -- I know we had a close one last week -- but they're sitting on top. The only thing is now they have to win the last three. And Princeton will never be easy." Beck however, was unaware of the challenge to his scoring throne being posed by Quakers junior women's basketball player Diana Caramanico, who is closing in on several of Beck's records. She now has 1,741 points in her three years and seems a very safe bet to surpass Beck's career record of 1,827 points. "No, I don't really get a chance to follow the women, but I always said my records were made to be broken," Beck said. "It is unbelievable that my record has lasted [48 years]. It feels good to know that you're still remembered because of them, but hopefully in time somebody will break them, and that's the way it should be." · Penn is currently one of only three teams that has a chance to go undefeated in conference play. Cincinnati (26-2, 14-0 Conference USA) and Utah State (23-5, 14-0 Big West) are the others. And the Quakers 13-game winning streak ranks second in the nation -- trailing only the 14-game spell currently enjoyed by Utah State. · Today is 6'11" Penn center Geoff Owens' 22nd birthday. "You know, we really haven't discussed any plans for the big fella," Langel said. "But I'm sure he would be the first one to say that winning an Ivy League championship and going back to the tournament would be a great birthday gift for him."


M. Lax: The young, the fast and the hopeful

(03/01/00 10:00am)

Records may fall as Janney leads attack for Penn A modest 6'1", 185 pounds, clad in a gray Penn Lacrosse shirt and blue shorts, Pete Janney doesn't stand out among his teammates the way he does in the Penn record books. The senior captain and 1998 honorable mention All-American is fifth all-time in goals scored and seventh in career points. While he is a lock to finish the year in the top five in each category, the top spots in each are well within reach. "I hadn't even thought about [the records] until this year," Janney said. "It's been brought to my attention a lot lately. It's something I'd like to do, you know, to leave your mark. To be able to look back and say I set that record." Janney has scored 93 goals and 134 points during his three-year Penn career. The records are 129 and 195, respectively, which means that he needs to match or better his career highs of 37 goals and 53 points in a season to become the all-time Quakers scoring leader. Improvement is nothing new to this Inside Lacrosse pre-season All-American, though. "I don't think many people in the recruiting envisioned that Peter would become the type of athlete he's become here," Penn coach Marc Van Arsdale said. "He's gotten better every year." The numbers bear out Van Arsdale's assertion. Janney has only bettered his numbers in points and goals scored every year since he became the first Quaker to earn the Ivy League Rookie of the Year Award in 1997. "It's gone by too fast," Janney said of his time in the Red and Blue. "To come here and be the first Ivy League Rookie of the Year from Penn, it was unbelievable. I think that's compelled me to keep setting goals and keep trying to improve." Janney has improved more than just his number and his position in the record books, though. He has improved in every facet of the game. "What he brought us, initially, was the ability to score goals," Van Arsdale said. "But he's become a much more complete player as he's matured." In Janney's own opinion though, he is still a scorer. "I'll try and go by people with my speed, and I have the ability to finish. That's what I've been banking on my whole career, and it's been good to me," Janney said. "[Janney] can dodge, he can score, he can feed, he can cut, he can play in the crease," sophomore Scott Solow said. "Whatever coach asks him to do, he can do it." This year, as a co-captain, Janney will be asked to provide the team with more than his scoring ability and all-around talent -- he has been asked to lead. "Rather than being the vocal guy that a lot of teams need, he does it by example, by his ability to take over a game at will," sophomore Peter Scott said. "And I think that's 10 times better than the guy who does it just by talking. Just watching him in practice has helped my game get better everyday." The consensus from teammates is that Janney leads by example with his stellar play, but in his last year, Janney is concentrating on becoming a vocal leader as well. "Being a captain, it kind of puts you in a position to [talk more]," Janney said. "And I've been dealing with that and trying to become more of a vocal leader." "Sometimes he's very vocal when we're close in a game or down," junior Todd Minerley said. "He'll speak up and get the team motivated." Janney finds his own motivation in the drive for the as-yet-elusive Ivy title. "I've been here four years and haven't had one yet," Janney said. "I'd like to have that ring."


Wharton MBA students help Final Four planners

(03/01/00 10:00am)

The six first-year MBA students are studying Philadelphia Women's Basketball 2000. When the nets are cut down, the trophies are handed out and the fans head for the exits, will there be anything left from the Women's Final Four in Philadelphia other than fond memories? That is the question six first-year Wharton MBA students are working to answer. Unlike past years, the 2000 Women's Final Four is being organized by a committee independent of the host universities -- Penn and St. Joseph's. That committee, Philadelphia Women's Basketball 2000, hopes to outlive March Madness and continue as a community organization working to promote women's athletics in Philadelphia. The six students chose to work with PWB as their Field Application Project -- a semester-long required course designed to introduce first-year MBAs to unstructured real-life business problems. Most project teams select companies and projects pre-screened by Wharton. The companies each pay $2,500 to Wharton in exchange for the consulting services of an MBA team. Team member Leah Buhl chose instead to use her connections to the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce to arrange a project with PWB, which had its $2,500 fee waived due to its non-profit status. "When we first went in, we said, 'Let's do something with the Final Four,'" group member Preston McGowan said. "What really came out was, 'What's going on after the Final Four?' and we thought that was a much bigger need for PWB." While making it clear that their work is not a comprehensive study, they hope to provide PWB Executive Director Cathy Andruzzi with a plan for how PWB can define and market itself if it lives on after the Final Four is over. As part of the course requirements, the group has met with its faculty advisor and prepared progress reports throughout the semester. The team's final report will not be in its final form until March 27 -- right in the heart of Championship Week. Andruzzi hopes that the team will suggest strategies for continuing PWB's transformation from host committee and corporate logo to a grass-roots oriented community organization. When PWB was formed in 1998, its logo and brand name were a way to sidestep NCAA regulations prohibiting the use of the NCAA logo by anyone other than its national sponsors. In order to increase local corporate support of the Final Four, PWB created its own logo and brand, which can be used by sponsors in their advertising. "We wanted to give the local community a brand to have ownership of," Andruzzi said. PWB's mission, however, goes beyond serving as a corporate logo. It has become active in the community through youth clinics and a women in sports speaker series. Its goals will culminate in a number of community-wide events during Championship Week at the end of March. "Our mission statement is much broader than Championship Week," Andruzzi said. "Our vision is to not just run a great week, but to help grow women's sports? to give young girls an opportunity on a grass-roots level to gain both physical and mental skills." What sort of structure will best serve those goals once the Final Four is over is one of the driving questions behind the Wharton students' project. Although their final report won't be finished until the end of March, the group has some hunches as to what it will recommend. One important decision will be the scope of the future PWB. The group thinks it is best if the organization sticks to promoting basketball, instead of expanding to support multiple sports. "Basketball is really a unifying game," Buhl said. "It goes across a wide range of socio-economic levels. In its efforts, [PWB] still draws attention to women's sports." The group has recently been paring down its focus even further due to the limited time of the semester. With little formal data available about the number of youth basketball leagues in the area, the students have had to use individual interviews with a variety of business and community leaders to gauge the interest in PWB and brainstorm on the ways PWB can organize itself. If PWB can live on past the Final Four, it will be a first for an organizing committee of its type. In previous years, the organizing committees for the Final Four have been more closely linked to the host universities and were designed strictly to support Championship Week. Even though PWB is without precedent, Andruzzi believes that now is a great time to build an organization like PWB. She noted that women's college basketball made a huge leap in popularity when the media-heavy Northeast devoted major news coverage to the University of Connecticut's 1995 undefeated season. As the Women's Final Four has never been held in the Northeast before, Andruzzi hopes to see a similar explosion of attention surrounding this year's final.


M. Lax: The young, the fast and the hopeful

(03/01/00 10:00am)

Recruits and a transfer fill out the roster Rebuilding is the wrong word. It's more like a few small repairs. The Penn men's lacrosse team lost its fair share of talent to graduation last year. The Quakers had to say goodbye to a total of nine letterwinners and six starters last June, but coach Marc Van Arsdale's squad is not suffering from any diminished expectations as Saturday's season opener with Notre Dame approaches. "Last year at this point, we were a little more settled as to what we were going to do," Van Arsdale said. "This year, I think we're a team that can get much better as the year goes on." If the Quakers are to improve on their 6-8 overall record (2-4 Ivy League) from last season, they will need to rely on the services of a slew of newcomers who will need to produce results from Saturday's regular season start onward. For the past four seasons, the Penn defense has had a reliable and gifted leader in goalie Matt Schroeder. The 1999 second team All-Ivy selection finished his career with 755 saves and started in an astounding 50 of 53 games he played over four years. Schroeder's absence in between the pipes is no reason for panic, however. Sophomore keeper John Carroll and freshman Ryan Kelly have split time in net in the Quakers' two victorious preseason scrimmages against Towson and Hobart. "I think it's awful wishful thinking that we can replace Matt," Van Arsdale said. "But I think we'll be in good shape with the both of them." Kelly, a Deer Park, N.Y., native, captained his high school team his junior and senior years and was named team MVP last season. Kelly is unquestionably talented, but he is not yet ready to monopolize playing time for Penn. "We have a different system here in terms of techniques of stopping the ball," Kelly said. "Right now, John and I are the same. I'm probably a little bit better at communicating with the rest of the defense, but he's better at stopping the ball." As Penn assistant coach and goalie specialist Tom McClelland continues to work with Kelly on his mechanics in the crease, he may develop into an everyday starter. But for now, it look as if it will be a freshman-sophomore platoon at goal. The Quakers hit the jackpot when it comes to welcoming new talent at the midfielder positions. The crown jewel of the incoming class is Alex Kopicki, who was one of the finest high school talents coming out of the Baltimore-area lacrosse hotbed last season. Kopicki, who stands 6'2" and weighs 185 pounds, was first-team All-Metro for St. Paul's, one of the most highly regarded high school programs in the country. "We got Alex Kopicki. As a freshman, he's ready to play a lot of minutes right away," Van Arsdale said. Another Baltimore product, Jake Martin, should provide added depth in the middle of the field for Penn. Junior Adam Solow comes by way of Hanover, N.H. The middie, who is originally from nearby Wynnewood, Pa., transferred to Penn after two standout seasons at Dartmouth. He led the Big Green in both goals and total points as a freshman. Solow joins his brother, sophomore Scott Solow, on the Red and Blue. "I think I came to Penn for three reasons. One, my brother's here and I like playing with him," Solow said. "Two, I'm from Philadelphia, and I got a little homesick. Three, I really like playing for coach Van Arsdale." Adam's father, Steve Solow, was a lacrosse captain for Penn in his senior year, 1973. The elder Solow is naturally pleased with his son's transfer. "My dad really wanted me to go to Penn," Adam said. "He's glad I'm here, and I'm glad. I had a miserable time on and off the field [at Dartmouth]."


Frat loses charter for rush violation

(03/01/00 10:00am)

Sigma Alpha Mu cannot return to campus until the spring of 2001 After violating dry rush policies last month by serving alcohol at an event, the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity has lost its charter and has been suspended by the University for at least a year, officials announced yesterday. SAM's suspension comes as a punishment for serving alcohol at a January 21 rush event, disobeying InterFraternity Council rush rules and breaking the conditions of the fraternity's current social probation. The fraternity was on probation for violating dry rush and anti-hazing policies a year ago. The suspension will take effect April 9 and last until the end of the calendar year, but the brothers will be allowed to continue to live in their house -- located at 3817 Walnut Street -- under the supervision of a live-in monitor. The 22 current pledges will be initiated on April 9. "The Chapter is prohibited from holding meetings or participating in, hosting, or sponsoring campus functions, using the name of Sigma Alpha Mu, the Greek letters, nicknames or other insignia, or otherwise functioning as a chapter," said a statement released yesterday by the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs. The fraternity may be allowed to recolonize in the spring of 2001 if the brothers meet the stringent conditions of their agreement with the University -- which include becoming permanently dry, completing a series of alcohol and risk management classes and doing community service. SAM National Executive Director Aaron Girson did not return repeated phone calls, nor did SAM President Jared Hendricks. Also as part of their punishment, the brothers agreed to place an advertisement in today's Daily Pennsylvanian acknowledging their violations and vowing to improve their conduct in the future. "The current membership of SAM is determined to prove that January's violation was an aberration and that the strides we have made for positive change in the Chapter and on campus will now continue uninterrupted," the brothers wrote in the ad. If the fraternity does recolonize a year from now, it will have to petition its national organization to regain its charter. And the brothers will never again be allowed to bring alcohol into their house, according to OFSA's statement. "The Chapter has agreed to become alcohol-free on a permanent basis, effective immediately," the statement said. If SAM is permitted to recolonize, the brothers will also be required to work on anti-alcohol abuse initiatives, according to OFSA's statement. "Working closely with the IFC, they will assume a leadership role in forming a task force to explore alternatives to alcohol at rush events." The suspension comes about a year after the brothers were disciplined for previous alcohol-related violations. The fraternity was placed on a one-year social probation and a two-year probation after two incidents last spring, the first being a rush event at a New Jersey bowling alley where the brothers brought five kegs and stole or damaged hundreds of bowling balls, pins and shoes. SAM was forced to reorganize in the fall and placed the 40 junior and senior brothers on alumni status, leaving just 21 active members. An IFC statement said the organization is happy with the way the situation was resolved. "We are glad that the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity and the University were able to work out an agreement that is acceptable to both parties," the statement said. "We look forward to having SAM play an active role in the Greek system in the future."


Health System exec. resigns

(03/01/00 10:00am)

Chief Operating Officer Robert martin resigned after only nine months. The reshuffling of University of Pennsylvania Health System executives continued this week with the surprise resignation of Chief Operating Officer Robert Martin on Monday. Martin's resignation comes just 13 days after former Chief Executive Officer and Medical School Dean William Kelley was asked to step down from his position by University President Judith Rodin. "He had done a terrific job," said Health System spokeswoman Lori Doyle, adding that Martin felt that stepping down was the best thing for him. Martin was not available for comment last night. Health System officials announced that I. William Ferniany, who most recently served as the Health System's senior vice president for administrative services, will serve as the interim COO while a national search for a permanent replacement is conducted. Although Martin's reason for leaving was not immediately clear, Interim CEO Peter Traber said in an e-mail sent to Health System administrators that it was Martin's own decision to resign from the position he held for nine months. Some have speculated, however, that his departure was related to the role the Hunter Group -- the Florida-based consulting firm that was brought to campus in July to help administrators slash costs -- is expected to play in UPHS as it attempts to put its financial turmoil behind it. With the announcement of Traber's appointment almost two weeks ago, Rodin said the firm would continue to advise Health System officials on their task of bringing the financially troubled system back to its feet. University officials have contracted the Hunter Group for a three-month consulting engagement, Ferniany explained, though that contract could be lengthened if needed. Alan Zuckerman, a consultant with Health Strategies and Solutions in Philadelphia, said the recent departures of Martin and Kelley could portend more UPHS changes. "It may be suggestive of a broader role that the Hunter Group is going to play," Zuckerman said. He explained that in the past, when executives of Hunter Group clients resigned, it was usually because the firm was asserting a greater degree of administrative control. But Health System and University officials have continually stressed that the Hunter Group executives are not going to assume administrative control of UPHS. "They're not here to slash and burn and they're not here to run the place," insisted Ferniany, who has worked for the Health System for seven years. Other experts in the field saw the recent departures as standard. "I don't think the Hunter Group is behind this at all," explained Joshua Nemzoff, the head of Nemzoff and Co., a New Hope healthcare consulting firm. "There is a rather clear, linear correlation between institutions losing significant amounts of money and management turnover." In addition to Martin and Kelley, the Health System has lost several other administrators over the past year. In October, former Chief Medical Officer David Shulkin stepped down to take a position with DoctorQuality.com. Former Chief Financial Officer John Wynne resigned in April for health reasons. And former Senior Vice President for Hospital Operations Thomas Beeman left in September. As interim COO, Ferniany said he will implement whatever strategies Traber, Rodin and the University Trustees agree upon. Ferniany added he is confident UPHS will meet the goal administrators set in May, which is to run a deficit of no more than $10 million in the current fiscal year. "We will probably make our budget this year," he said. "We will come awful damn close, that's for sure."


Cmte. releases sweatshop report

(03/01/00 10:00am)

The report recommends Penn hold off on joining a monitoring group until certain conditions are met. The Ad Hoc Committee on Sweatshop Labor released its full report to University President Judith Rodin yesterday, including both a proposed code of conduct for University-logo apparel and a recommendation to evaluate the Worker Rights Consortium and the Fair Labor Association before joining either. The report identifies the lack of university representation on the two organizations' governing boards as the committee's prime concern and recommends that Penn only sign on with the FLA or the WRC or both if the groups resolve this concern. "The current representation of colleges and universities on the governing boards of the FLA and the WRC is unacceptable," the report stated. "Institutions of higher education are at the forefront of the movement and must have a voice that is balanced with those of other groups on the governing boards of the FLA and the WRC." The committee's report comes several weeks after members of Penn Students Against Sweatshops launched a nine day sit-in at College Hall, which culminated with the University withdrawing its membership from the FLA. The report recommends that the University join either the WRC or the FLA only if they agree to augment the university representation on their governing boards. The committee began meeting February 10, reviewing materials and listening to presentations from both groups before presenting this unanimous report to Rodin on Monday. "I expect to respond to the committee's recommendation on monitoring organizations shortly," Rodin said in a statement Monday night. PSAS members have repeatedly demanded that the University withdraw from the FLA -- which they contend is biased and inefficient because of its close ties with the garment industry -- and join the fledgling WRC instead. Anti-sweatshop and human rights activists claim that the WRC provides better safeguards for workers' rights. The WRC only possesses the membership of a handful of colleges and universities, while over 130 schools belong to the FLA. But the recent decision of three Big 10 schools to join the WRC generated increased publicity and funding for the new group. Penn student anti-sweatshop activists continue to request that the University abstain from re-joining the FLA and become a member of the WRC instead. "We still believe that the FLA is not an adequate organization," College junior and PSAS member Miriam Joffe-Block said last night. But Joffe-Block was pleased that the committee's report agreed with three of PSAS' main concerns with the FLA's policies on public disclosure, factory certification and independent monitoring. According to Joffe-Block, the WRC currently has greater university representation than the FLA does, addressing the committee's chief concern. She noted that the WRC allocates six of its 12 seats on the governing board to university students and administrators, while the FLA only delegates one of its 14 seats to university representatives. Also included in the committee's report is a proposed Code of Workplace Conduct for Penn apparel licensees, outlining policies manufacturers should abide by in the production of Penn-logo apparel. The code outlines a range of human rights standards and enforcement procedures. Among the recommendations are establishing a living wage at factories, a minimum employment age of 15 and the right for employees to collectively bargain with unions of their choice. "The goals of this code are to promote full, productive and freely chosen employment and to assert that Penn expects its licensees to conduct business in a manner consistent with the high standards in its code," the committee said in the report. The proposed code of conduct will be printed in Almanac, the University's journal of record, for comment.


Mayor talks on Phila. public school system

(03/01/00 10:00am)

When Mayor John Street entered the Sayre Middle School auditorium last night to discuss public education in West Philadelphia, the crowd rose to its feet with thunderous applause. About 300 parents, students, teachers and other concerned community members packed the auditorium for the chance to hear Street's agenda for improving the public school system. Street, who in January dubbed 2000 the "Year of the Child," has won strong support in many communities -- including West Philadelphia -- for his pledges to reform the city's severely underfunded and poorly staffed school system. "We can't have a world class city with a second class educational system," Street said, adding that he intended to visit every cluster -- groups of area schools -- in the Philadelphia area to share ideas. Decreasing classroom size, increasing teacher salaries and opening up the schools for extracurricular activities topped the mayor's list of priorities for helping West Philadelphia schools succeed. The audience anxiously awaited Street's belated arrival, listening to Cluster Leader Janice Butler discuss improvements that would most benefit the group of 13 schools that makes up the West Philadelphia Cluster. "Our children deserve quality teachers providing them with quality education," Butler said. "I am delighted to introduce a mayor who is saying what we need to hear." Street began his speech by saying that he will use his new power to choose school board members to replace certain board members, although he maintained that he will not remove the current president and vice president. Furthermore, Street stressed that he would not cut educational programs from the city budget. However, he acknowledged that certain proposed initiatives for the public schools might be difficult to implement due to a lack of funding in the city budget. "We have a deficit and the deficit is getting bigger, and one day we're going to run out of money," Street admitted to the crowd. "When we run out of money, then you're going to have to decide what is really important to you. Are you ready to fight for public education?" Many of the audience members showed support for Street's plans and said they shared his concern about the state of public education but worry if certain plans are actually practical. "[Street] hit on all the things we've been talking about, but we're already spending at a deficit. And it all comes down to dollars and cents," said John Lay, a 30-year teacher at West Philadelphia High School. Others voiced their concern about discipline problems that plague the schools, coupled with the lack of teacher and non-teacher support, that create an environment in which learning is difficult. Lily Connor, whose 7-year-old daughter attends Harrington School, says that the playground at recess "looks like a Roman War. I see that they are totally out of control -- they don't listen to the teachers." Street said he hopes to add cultural programs and make school athletic facilities and computers available to students year-round -- suggestions many audience members agreed with. "There should be something for the children to do during the summer," said Willicent Wise, mother of two girls who attend school in the West Philadelphia Cluster.


Big city mayors talk on urban problems

(03/01/00 10:00am)

The discussion centered on education issues like private school vouchers. When former Philadelphia Mayor Wilson Goode returned to his high school alma mater several years ago, he found an auditorium filled with 150 wandering, sleeping and gossiping kids. It wasn't a large study hall. It wasn't lunchtime. The school simply couldn't fill its classrooms with teachers, leaving the students without a class to attend. "There's something fundamentally wrong," Goode said yesterday in a forum devoted to urban education. Goode's experience framed "Should Big-City Mayors Support School Choice?", a discussion sponsored by the Fox Leadership Forum on Urban Education, which was held yesterday in the Fels Center of Government. Moderated by Goode, Political Science Professor John DiIulio, Jersey City Mayor Bret Schundler, New Orleans Mayor Marc Morial and former Indianapolis Mayor Steve Goldsmith together tackled the issues surrounding urban education and school choice, specifically addressing school vouchers and charter schools. Schundler defended the usefulness of both vouchers and charter schools in improving public school systems, explaining that both introduce the type of economic competition in schools that is necessary to force them to improve. "Money means power," he said to the more than 40 students assembled in the Fels Center. "The money follows the child with vouchers." But according to Goode, vouchers can only bring bad news to public school districts. "Vouchers are simply bad public policy," Goode explained. "Vouchers are political gimmicks that distract from the real business of creating quality education," he continued, noting that they often divide communities. And Morial added that introducing vouchers into school systems can create a "train wreck" of parents eager to place their children in private schools. The quartet also debated other reforms public schools have recently started to implement in an attempt to increase poor student performance. Morial noted that regardless of the use of vouchers or charter school development, under-performing schools need quality facilities, smaller class size and more teachers. "In my city, the prisons look better than the schools," he said. "The schools don't look like the Third World. They look like the Third World used to look." After the panel spent almost two hours analyzing these issues, the audience -- comprised largely of College and Fels Center students -- was given a chance to ask questions of the politicians. Josh Dickstein, a Fels student and graduate of a Philadelphia area public school, said he was pleased with the overall event. "I loved it," he said. "I want to be mayor." And College junior Lauren Sypek echoed his sentiments. "It was amazing to have that many leaders in one place."


Concert provides int'l flair

(03/01/00 10:00am)

With an infectious rhythm and enthusiasm, Sones de Mexico Ensemble Chicago brought the music of Mexico to Philadelphia during their Saturday night performance at the International House. Performing in front of more than 300 area residents, the ensemble -- a six-person folk music group from Chicago -- offered a lively show that demonstrated the diversity of styles and sounds within Mexican music. The group incorporated a host of different musical instruments into its performance. In fact, over 25 string, wind and percussion instruments, including a donkey jaw, were used as the band created the unique sounds of the different styles. The group specializes in son, a type of traditional Mexican folk music. Each region of Mexico has its own unique style of son. The band paid tribute to several of these different styles as they played a wide array of pieces from all over Mexico. Members of Sones de Mexico said they hope to increase the public's appreciation of Mexican music. "Our mission is to promote Mexican music and continue to play for different people to broaden their definition of Mexican music," group member and agent Juan Dies explained. With that goal in mind, the group regularly interjected explanations of the music, as Dies paused several times in order to describe the origins of the different pieces. During intermission, several audience members said they were particularly surprised to learn that African music influenced Mexican music. "It's indicative of the complexities of music that all societies develop," remarked New Jersey native Walter Haworth, who attended the performance along with his wife. Sones de Mexico offered audience members more than just a learning experience, however. The group, with undeniable skill, kept the audience bobbing their heads and tapping their feet in rhythm to the music. The ensemble, in their efforts to recreate the atmosphere of fandangos -- traditional Mexican dance parties -- played with an enthusiasm that the audience quickly appreciated. "It was pretty lively. I liked the parts that had instruments besides strings," said Kathleen O'Donnell, who attended the performance. One of the band members also danced during several of the numbers and impressed the audience with his quick foot work as he tapped out rhythms that were incorporated into the music. It was his dance with two machetes, however, that seemed to awe audience members the most. Striking the machetes together in time with the music, he created sparks as many in the audience gasped and applauded. During the second half of the show, the audience had its own chance to dance. At first hesitant to accept the band's invitation to come dance in front of the stage, many ultimately overcame their inhibitions and joined the band. Sones de Mexico attempted to close the evening by playing several well known pieces, such as "La Bamba." But when the ensemble finished, the crowd began shouting "Otra, otra" -- the Spanish word for "another." The group then performed a short encore. "The music is so strong," said audience member Rob Kirsch after the show. "[Sones de Mexico] is great."


W. Tennis loses two in South

(02/29/00 10:00am)

This weekend, the Penn women's tennis team headed south to play Georgia Tech and Clemson, two nationally ranked teams the Quakers had never played before. And even though the Red and Blue lost both matches, this weekend gave them an early taste of the competition they will face from the elite teams in the Ivy League. Penn's first disappointment of the weekend was a 9-0 loss to No. 49 Georgia Tech on Saturday. "We got shellacked," Penn senior captain Elana Gold said. "It snowballed in a bad way. It wasn't a pleasant experience." While five of the Quakers' singles matches were lost in two straight sets, Penn sophomore Jolene Sloat won her first set 6-2 before the Yellow Jackets' Jamie Wong fought back and captured the next two sets 6-1, 6-0. Sloat believes that the first Quakers' loss of the match was contagious. "If I'm playing a match and my teammate on the next court is doing well, I'll step it up and I'll play better," she said. "If they're losing, it's not going to have a positive effect on me." Like Sloat's three-setter, the doubles battle between the Georgia Tech pair of Sabrina Pardo and Bobbi Guthrie and the Penn team of Lenka Beranova and Rochelle Raiss was tightly contested until the end, when the Yellow Jackets edged them, 8-6. Penn junior Shubha Srinivasan believes, quite simply, that the entire team had a bad day. "We lost intensity as a team," she said. "Usually some people have a bad day and others pull it off." Srinivasan and Sloat believe the Quakers' post-match talk ended up helping them prepare for their match against Clemson. The Quakers reflected on what was good about individual matches before discussing what needed improvement. Sunday's match with Clemson started off on the wrong foot. Because of rain, the match was moved to an indoor facility -- half of whose courts were taken up by an ongoing men's tournament -- and started an hour and a half late. "We only had four courts, and it was really disorganized," Srinivasan said. "[The setup] was not very professional, and it kind of upset our team. But it's not an excuse." After losing her first set, 6-3, to the Tigers' Anna Savitskaya, Penn senior Anastasia Pozdniakova pulled through and won her next two sets 6-2, 7-5. "She played an excellent match," Gold said of her teammate. "She inspired us all." Srinivasan and Sloat teamed up for doubles and won their match, 8-1, bringing the Quakers their second and final point of the day. Penn's final losing score of 5-2 is misleading. Because court availability caused delays, Gold and Sloat -- playing Nos. 5 and 6 singles, respectively -- were winning their matches when they were forced to leave them unfinished so the Quakers could catch their plane back to Philadelphia. "We learned how to handle adversity and keep our heads high," Penn coach Michael Dowd said. "We can't let one point, one game, one set put us back. We have to look at the big picture." Dowd believes Georgia Tech and Clemson are roughly at the same level of competition that the Quakers will face against Ivy powerhouses Princeton and Harvard later in the season. "The team is getting consistently stronger," he said. "It's coming down to crunch time, and it's time to get the missing pieces and put it together. You have to be exposed to a high level of competition to get better, and we'll get better very quickly."


W. Track stumbles to last-place Heps finish

(02/29/00 10:00am)

Bassey Adjah and Ruthie Neuhaus accounted for 13 of the Quakers' 17 points in the meet at Dartmouth. In its most crucial meet of the indoor season, the youth and inexperience of the Penn women's track team showed in a disappointing ninth-place finish at the Heptagonal Championships. The Quakers finished dead last in the field that was comprised of all eight Ivies as well as Navy. In the meet, held in Hanover, N.H., Penn was only able to muster 17 points in the 16-event competition that awarded points for placing sixth or higher. Harvard won the meet with a total score of 109. "We have never been in this position before and it is really tough to justify," Penn assistant coach Tony Tenisci said. "Every team experiences this sort of thing at some point, so we just need to deal with it." Penn received 13 of its total 17 points courtesy of its most experienced athletes -- junior Bassey Adjah and senior Ruthie Neuhaus. Adjah recorded a distance of 18'10.75" in taking third-place in the long jump and picking up six points. Adjah picked up one more point with her sixth-place finish in the 55-meter hurdles. Neuhaus recorded a personal record of 39'6" in the triple jump, besting her former mark of 39'4.5". Her efforts were good enough for third place and six team points. "This meet was obviously very tough for us as a team, but we did have some girls do well," Tenisci said. "Bassey was incredible in the long jump and Ruthie was competitive against a very difficult field in the triple jump." Sophomore Liz Wittels earned Penn two points by finishing fifth in the pole vault with a height of 11'3.5". Junior Ami Desai finished up two spots behind Wittels with a distance of 10'9.5". Penn also received a point from junior Qianna Snooks' sixth-place finish in the 400-meter run with a time of 58.55. The final Quakers point came courtesy of a sixth-place finish in the 4x400 relay with a time of 3:56.70. "It really seemed like most of the other teams had peaked already and we are still coming along," Snooks said. "We are just getting started with our season and are looking forward to the outdoor season." Clearly, Penn's youth and lack of much experience played a role in last weekend's showing. The freshmen-laden Quakers just could not produce nearly enough top-six finishes to mount much of a challenge. Penn, which finished up 92 points behind champion Harvard, showed a major lack of depth. With only six scorers and only 13 top-10 finishes, the young Penn squad was clearly not yet ready for the fierce competition of Heps. "The league as a whole has matured a lot but we are really young," Tenisci said. "Very few freshmen have really contributed in the league this year. Not many freshmen can perform well because it is just so overwhelming against all these talented people." For most of the Penn squad, last weekend's competition was the final meet of the indoor season. Desai, Wittels, Adjah, junior Melissa MacIntyre and Neuhaus, however, will have at least one more meet -- the ECAC championships this weekend in Boston. "We just can't focus on last weekend too much because we had to go through this type of learning experience," Tenisci said. "It isn't easy or comfortable, but I think a lot of the girls really grew up and matured in this meet. Outdoors should be better and we will definitely be better next year."


M. Squash finishes as national No. 13

(02/29/00 10:00am)

Penn lost to Brown for the first time but bounced back for two victories. The score was all too familiar for the Penn men's squash team. The Quakers dropped their preliminary match at the Team Championships over the weekend to Brown -- the last in a string of near misses for Penn this season. The Quakers, however, managed a dramatic turn of fortunes in their consolation bracket matches at Yale on Saturday and Sunday. Penn took matches against Colby and Bowdoin, claiming fifth place and clinching the consolation bracket of the Hoehn Division. The victories also gave Penn a 13th-place finish at the national tournament -- two spots above its finish in the regular season. The Quakers finished the season with an overall record of 5-10. Brown, which lost to Penn 5-4 earlier in the season, reversed the score in the preliminary match on Friday. The win was Brown's first-ever over Penn in men's squash. Penn was counting on the bottom of its order to support a lineup missing injured sophomore Mukund Khaitan. But it was Penn's top players that carried the load, as the Quakers took matches at the No. 1, 3 and 4 spots. Penn co-captain Peter Withstandley, playing in the No. 1 slot, impressed with a five-game victory over Brown freshman Ben Oliner. Penn sophomore John Griffin, senior co-captain Andrew Hopkins and freshman Sam Miller each took three-game victories for the Quakers. Brown went on to finish the weekend with wins over Navy and Cornell, taking the Hoehn Division and the tournament's No. 9 ranking. "Brown was tough, but they had one of their most difficult matches against us," Penn junior Ritesh Tilani said. Penn managed to regain its composure after being edged Friday, finishing Saturday with a convincing 6-3 win over Colby, which finished the season ranked at No. 11. The key to victory for Penn was a surge by the bottom of its lineup. Although Penn's top three players dropped their matches, the rest of the team managed a sweep. Penn juniors Vicky Singh and Tilani picked up three-game victories for the Quakers, while sophomore Will Ruthrauff and senior Bill Bryan won in five. "We didn't get down after Brown, which was key," said freshman Sam Miller, who was one of two Quakers to win all three matches this weekend. Penn was again the underdog Sunday, facing No. 13 Bowdoin. In what may have been the most exciting match in the division, Bowdoin and Penn were evenly matched at two games apiece after the first set. Hopkins finished his weekend's sweep at the No. 4 spot, claiming his final dual match victory as a Quaker by a 3-1 count. The second set of matches remained a dead heat with Penn and Bowdoin each claiming two more games. Bowdoin senior Jeremy Smith dropped Griffin in four games at the No. 3 spot. Miller needed four games to defeat Bowdoin freshman George Hubbard, while Bryan managed a victory in four games. The match hinged on the No. 1 match between Withstandley and Bowdoin junior Jamie Shea. Withstandley battled back from a 2-1 deficit to clinch the decisive fifth victory for the Quakers. Withstandley, along with several of Penn's other top players, will head to Williams Friday to begin play in the Individuals Tournament. The future looks bright for the Quakers after this season, as Hopkins will be the only regular player to graduate after this season.


M. Fencing flips Lions the bird

(02/29/00 10:00am)

The Penn and Columbia men's fencing teams have unusual statues that are exchanged at the end of their meets. The victorious team is given a statue of two fingers making a victory sign, and the defeated team receives a statue too -- but theirs only has one finger. The middle one. The fact that the coaches of both teams forgot to bring the statues to Saturday's multi-meet at Temple was of no consequence, since the Quakers -- who were already in possession of the winning trophy after last year's victory -- edged Columbia, 15-12, marking their third consecutive victory over the Lions. "It's easy to be cheerful when you win," Penn coach Dave Micahnik said. "The fencers need to learn that it's important to be as intense as you need to be in a competition, but the other thing that goes with that is sportsmanship." After the Quakers' victory, each coach made a little speech to lighten the intensity of the meet. "It shows that when you're all done fighting, [fencing] is a sport," Micahnik said. While the meet with Columbia had the Red and Blue in a lighter mood, the Quakers couldn't hide their disappointment at not holding onto the Ivy title, which slipped away when currently undefeated Princeton beat Yale at Old Nassau on Saturday. Despite falling short of the Ivy crown, Penn junior David Cohen believes the meet with Columbia was a good way to end the season. Cohen claimed that because the Quakers' only shot at the title depended on beating Columbia, Penn was especially motivated for the meet. Penn senior captain David Liu noted that the Quakers' win wasn't definite until the second round, when they were up 13-5. When Liu fenced Columbia as a freshman, the Lions went on a nine-bout winning streak in the third round that won the meet. "We were getting a little worried at points," he said. "[Columbia has] a weird team. They have their superstars, but they also have really basic fencers who aren't as good." After their meet with Columbia, the Quakers moved on to fence two of their toughest opponents of the season -- Penn State and St. John's. For the past two years, the five-time defending national champ Nittany Lions have edged the Quakers, 14-13. On Saturday, Penn fell to their opponents by the same frustrating score. After Penn lost the first round, 7-2, not even its impressive 5-4 defeat of the Nittany Lion's epee squad could save them. "We were kind of daunted by them in the beginning," Penn junior Mike Golia said. "They're definitely beatable, but we didn't get off on the right foot." Although the Quakers had been optimistic going into their first two meets of the day, they knew that it would be a stretch to beat the still-undefeated St. John's team. "Their epee team is the Israeli national team," Micahnik said. "They have the personnel to pull off the NCAA championships." Even without the help of their many fencers who took the year off to train for the Olympics, the Red Storm still clobbered Penn's epee and sabre squads, 8-1, while the Quakers' foilists managed an impressive 7-2 finish. Penn foilists and brothers David and Yale Cohen defeated their longtime opponent and St. John's top fencer, Joe Fisher. Penn junior epeeist Charles Hamann also logged an impressive victory when he overcame NCAA champion Alex Roytblat. Saturday's multi-meet marks the close of Penn's regular season. This weekend, the Quakers' top nine fencers will head to Yale to compete in the IFAs, while the NCAA regionals and championship will be held later this month.


Barchi shares life's work with students

(02/29/00 10:00am)

Provost Robert Barchi took a break from his normal routine at College Hall yesterday to introduce a small group of students to his own specialty in the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Fourteen undergraduates attended Barchi's preceptorial, "The Brain in Brief," to learn how the brain functions from the chief academic officer of the University, who was studying neurology long before he was searching for new deans or dealing with binge drinking on college campuses. Before Barchi was named provost in December 1998, he was chair of Penn's Neuroscience and Neurology departments. Yesterday's meeting was the second of the three gatherings of the preceptorial, which are short, not-for-credit seminars that are generated by students and conducted by lauded faculty from different departments of the University. Joined by HUP's Section Chief of Neuroradiology Robert Grossman, Barchi gave students a tour of some areas of the hospital's Radiology division. Barchi said the preceptorial is meant to be a non-scientific introduction to the functions of the brain. So it was only fitting that yesterday's class involved looking at different equipment that neurologists use in order to study brain problems in patients, as well as learning about the ways in which these malfunctions are handled. During the session, College freshman Becky Davidson volunteered to have an MRI taken of herself, so that Barchi, along with Grossman, could use it to explain the different functions of the brain to the class. Barchi illustrated the strong magnetic forces of the MRI machine by saying that, in the 1.5 Tesla field of the apparatus, a "metal paperclip becomes a weapon." "It wasn't as scary as I thought. It was good to experience without having any real brain problems," Davidson said after the procedure was complete. Several of the students enrolled in the preceptorial said they enjoyed the opportunity to learn about a subject they considered interesting from the provost himself. "It's completely new," said Wharton sophomore Sasha Balkaran, of the preceptorial. "Last [session] I got to touch a brain." And fellow Wharton sophomore John DePalma remarked, "I always loved neurology but did not have the chance to take a class in it." Other top officials have led preceptorials in the past. University President Judith Rodin led a one last spring on public discourse in America, and former Trustees Chairman Roy Vagelos has taught one on the pharmaceutical industry. This semester, College junior Brad Hirsch approached Barchi and convinced him to offer a preceptorial in his field.


Doubles strong for M. Tennis

(02/29/00 10:00am)

The Penn men's tennis team had a pair of mirror-image performances last week against American University and North Carolina State, beating American 5-2 and losing to the Wolfpack by the same margin. The Quakers beat the Eagles handily on Thursday, winning all three doubles matches and four of six singles matches. The No. 1 Penn doubles team of freshman Ryan Harwood and senior Brett Meringoff won their match easily, defeating the American duo, 8-4. It was more of a struggle for the No. 2 doubles team of junior Eric Sobotka and sophomore Fanda Stejskal, with the match going into a tiebreaker which Penn won, 9-8. Penn's No. 3 doubles team of junior Joey Zupan and sophomore Brian Barki won easily, 8-3. In singles competition, No. 1 Stejskal defeated his opponent Jason Moon, 6-1, 6-2, to cruise to an early victory. Sobotka had a rougher time at the No. 2 position, taking an early lead by winning the first set, 6-2, and then falling behind in the second and third sets, 6-1 and 6-3, respectively, to lose the match. But it was easy for Penn at the No. 3 spot, as Harwood skunked his opponent, 6-0, 6-0, for an impressive victory. And freshman Andy Kolker, a new addition to the Penn lineup, managed a win at No. 6 over American in a three-set thriller. Against N.C. State, Penn continued its success in doubles, but only managed one win in singles. The No. 1 doubles team of Meringoff and Harwood repeated Thursday's success, defeating the Wolfpack, 8-5. Stejskal and Sobotka were unable to pull out a win in doubles, losing 8-4. The No. 3 team of Barki and Zupan won their match, 8-3. "N.C. State was one of the best doubles we've played," Penn coach Gordie Ernst said. "We could do better, though." It was a rough day for Penn in singles. Only Harwood, playing at No. 3, was able to pull out a win against his Wolfpack opponent. After winning the first set, 7-5, Harwood finished his opponent off in the second set, 7-6. For the rest of the day, only Rob Pringle was able to capture a set for the Quakers, falling in three at No. 5. "I thought we were going to beat [N.C. State]. I was a little disappointed. They did play well. It was just a couple of things here and there," Harwood said. "We've never played with that lineup before. Gordie was experimenting a little more and it wasn't our regular lineup." Both of the events were preseason matches for the Quakers. After finishing last year with a 2-7 record in the Eastern Intercollegiate Tennis League, Penn is trying to find its strongest lineup now before it heads into its first EITL competition on March 29 against Navy. "We have a lot of talent on the team and [Ernst] wants to see who is going to step up in actual matches," Harwood said. "The Ivy season lineup is what's going to count." Penn will get a chance to further refine its lineup tomorrow when it faces Division III schools Swarthmore and Haverford.


Another Poli Sci prof to leave U.

(02/29/00 10:00am)

JosZ Antonio Cheibub will leave at the end of the semester for Yale U. The already embattled Political Science Department, which has been struggling in recent years to recruit new professors, will face the loss of another of its junior faculty members next year. Professor JosZ Antonio Cheibub, who specializes in comparative politics and Latin American politics, will leave Penn's faculty at the end of the semester to join the Political Science Department at Yale University. Cheibub said yesterday that Yale "made a good offer for me to work there," calling the move "a good professional opportunity." He noted that Penn's recruitment problems in recent years have left its Political Science Department behind that of many peer institutions. "It's just a better department," he said of Yale's Political Science Department, adding that it has hired several comparative politics specialists during the past few years. Despite the ongoing difficulties the department has faced, Ian Lustick, the chairman of Penn's Political Science Department, said Cheibub's loss is "not going to be a major problem." The department currently plans to hire one junior faculty member this year, he said, and the loss of Cheibub means that one more assistant professor in comparative politics will need to be hired next year. "We are going to be recruiting in comparative politics next year, which we didn't think we were going to do," Lustick said. Lustick added that the department's biggest difficulties have been in its recruitment of senior faculty members -- not junior ones, who he said have typically been easier to bring to Penn. The Political Science Department may use the new opportunity to recruit someone with expertise in European politics, which some department members feel is a weak area right now, Lustick noted. However, Cheibub, who is currently in his fifth year at Penn, said he felt the department had been ignoring hirings for junior faculty positions in recent years, especially in the area of comparative politics. "They haven't recruited in this area for some time," Cheibub said. "Penn isn't hiring enough assistant professors," he added. "They are trying to recruit senior faculty." Cheibub will continue as a junior faculty member at Yale. The Political Science Department has been hit by several resignations, retirements and failed tenure bids over the past three years and has struggled to find replacements to fill its depleted faculty. Last year, the department received an added boost when it landed three new faculty members -- one full professor, one tenured associate professor and one assistant professor. In a strategic plan unveiled last spring, the School of Arts and Sciences named the Political Science Department as deserving of increased faculty appointments, calling for the department to be provided with more funding in the next several years.


U. City may gain pizza store

(02/29/00 10:00am)

Negotiations are in the works for a new pizzeria and bar to be located at 36th and Chestnut streets. Students craving a new place to eat may soon have one more option on campus. Pizzarustica, a gourmet, wood-burning oven shop and bar, signed a letter of intent earlier this month to move into a recently-vacated lot at 36th and Chestnut streets, according to John Greenwood a top official at the University's real estate company. Pending finalization of the lease, Pizzarustica, a cafeteria-style pizzeria, would open within about 90 days of the lease's signing in the space formerly held by Ace-Z 4 Pizza, Greenwood said. "We're trying really hard to work through the lease negotiations," Greenwood said yesterday. He added that the restaurant's price range will be moderate and comparable in style to establishments like California Pizza Kitchen. The 8'' to 16'' pizzas will range between $10 and $16 per pizza, according to Pizzarustica's operator -- a member of the Philadelphia food and beverage industry for the past 16 years who previously owned a successful restaurant that is still in existence. "The beauty of a pizza is that it is a one dish meal," said the operator of the restaurant, who asked to remain anonymous until the lease is finalized. "I think pizza is probably the best meal in the world." Pointing to the scarcity of quality pizza restaurants in the University City area, the operator added that she hopes Pizzarustica will be open by the spring. Capturing a Mediterranean spirit, the 80-seat restaurant -- described as cosmopolitan, sophisticated and student-friendly by the operator -- will display paninis and salads in the front marketplace area while providing additional seating for leisurely dining or studying in the back. Greenwood said the University evicted Ace-Z 4 to "better position that corner with a stronger operator that could energize the terrific space," adding that the establishment will be completely remodeled, offer extended hours and provide outdoor seating. Along with Pizzarustica, several other dining options are coming to campus. Bitar's Restaurant, serving Middle Eastern cuisine, will fill the site of the former Cool Peppers Mexican Grill on 40th Street by the end of March. And Stephen Starr has said his new upscale, Asian-style eatery will open in Sansom Common later this year. And Izzy and Zoe's delicatessen, a fast-food establishment on 40th Street, opened last week to hordes of students who had long awaited a bagel shop on campus.


M. Hockey moves on to finals

(02/29/00 10:00am)

Nobody said it was going to be easy. After steamrolling through the Delaware Valley Collegiate Hockey Conference regular season with a 16-1-0 record, the Penn men's club hockey team needed a come-from-behind effort to beat Kutztown, 5-3, in the conference semifinals. With its league-leading record, Penn clinched a bye in the first round of the DVCHC playoffs. Meanwhile, Kutztown disposed of Millersville, 5-3, on Friday night to earn the right to play Penn the following day. Given Penn's regular season performance, the top-seeded Quakers were the definite favorites going into their match with the fifth-seeded Golden Bears. Moreover, one week prior to Saturday's semifinal, the Quakers soundly defeated Kutztown 7-4 at the Class of 1923 rink. But Saturday's game was a little too close for comfort. The Golden Bears scored twice in the game's opening minutes to immediately put Penn behind the eight ball. "They were both fluke goals," Penn sophomore forward Whit Matthews said. "The first was a controversial goal. The second came on a slapshot from the blue line that Pat [Baude, Penn's goalie] had trouble controlling." The controversy surrounding the first goal centered on the fact that Kutztown appeared to have scored after the goal came off the moorings. Nevertheless, the play was ruled a goal, giving the Golden Bears a 1-0 lead 2:38 into the first period. After adding its second goal 54 seconds later, a third Kutztown goal could have put the game away early, but Baude kept the Quakers in the game. "One of our weaknesses was that we gave up odd-man breaks, but Pat made a lot of big saves on two-on-one [situations]," Matthews said. Penn finally got on the scoreboard with 7:51 remaining in the first period. Matthews scored a power play goal on a nice cross-ice feed from defenseman Colby Zaph that found Matthews parked in front of a wide-open goal. Zaph added a power play goal of his own to knot the score at 2-2 before the first intermission. A little past the halfway mark of the game, the Red and Blue took their first lead of the contest. Sophomore forward Ross Giambalvo scooped up a Baude rebound and took the puck coast-to-coast, en route to a breakaway goal that gave Penn a 3-2 lead. Three minutes later, the Golden Bears responded, but the 3-3 tie was short-lived. Less than a minute after Kutztown tied the game, Penn regained the lead on freshman forward Mike Sand's game-winning goal. The third period was a defensive battle. Neither team was able to score until Penn added an insurance goal when sophomore defenseman Ryan Redpath scored an empty netter for the Red and Blue with 30 seconds left in the contest. Baude finished the game with 23 saves, and Kutztown goalie Adam Spittler stopped 36 shots. "We had been outshooting them, but we weren't jumping on the rebounds," Matthews said. "[Spittler's] team needed him most in the third, and he came up with a lot of big saves." Nevertheless, Kutztown could not get the third-period goal they needed to tie the game, so the DVCHC regular season champions advanced to the finals. Penn will face off against Temple this weekend in a best-of-three series to determine the DVCHC Champion. Temple is the No. 2 seed in the tournament thanks to its 15-2-0 record during the regular season. One of the Owls' two losses came at Penn, where the Quakers beat their Philadelphia rivals, 7-4. "We beat them before, so we can beat them again," Matthews said.