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Penn looking to hire dean for freshmen

(03/23/00 10:00am)

The position, as advertised, would involve coordinating advising and programs for first-year students. The College of Arts and Sciences will soon hire a new staff member to serve as the "dean of freshmen," a position created as part of the College's ongoing advising overhaul. The post will involve coordinating advising efforts, the expanded New Student Orientation and many other programs for the benefit of first-year students, School of Arts and Sciences Dean Samuel Preston said yesterday. The dean of freshmen will "serve as an advocate for freshmen in the College office," Preston said and will organize freshmen advising and academic-development programs. The position was created as a result of a reorganization of the current College advising staff, he said, which is part of the College's efforts to integrate the many parts of its now-fragmented advising system. Preston noted that all freshmen will remain within the College's regular advising system, though their activities will be coordinated by the new dean. "There will not be a separate staff of advisors for freshmen," he said. The dean of freshmen will also be responsible for organizing NSO in the College and for overseeing the creation of handbooks for incoming freshmen and their parents. The Council of Undergraduate Deans voted earlier this semester to expand NSO from four days to seven, allowing an expanded academic advising component to be added. The dean of freshmen will only be responsible for coordinating academic and advising programs for first-year students, Preston said, after which responsibility for the students will fall under the regular advising coordinators. Preston said the deanship is similar to ones that exist at undergraduate colleges in several other universities. The new dean of freshmen will report to College Dean Richard Beeman and Deputy Provost Peter Conn, according to an advertisement placed in The Chronicle of Higher Education announcing the position. Preston said that although a national search is being conducted to fill the position, both internal and external candidates are being considered. He expects the position to be filled within the next month, allowing the new dean to have time to prepare plans for the fall semester. Applications for the job will be accepted until April 15. According to the advertisement for the position, candidates must have at least a master's degree in a field that is taught in the College and a minimum of five years of "significant and progressively responsible experience in an undergraduate college program."


M. Fencing led by Cohen's dominance

(03/22/00 10:00am)

Spring break might be over, but five members of the Penn men's fencing team are heading to sunny California this Friday. It will not, however, be a pleasure trip, as these Quakers are competing in the NCAA Championships at Stanford. Qualification for the NCAAs is based upon a fencer's season evaluation -- which consists of the number of bouts won and the strength of his team's schedule -- and his placement at the NCAA Mid-Atlantic/ South Region Championships, which were held March 12 at Penn State. At State College, Pa., Penn freshman Yale Cohen won the foil event and recorded an impressive 23-1 finish for the day. He went undefeated in the final 12-person round robin. Before the tournament, Cohen was upset to see that his name was not on a list of fencers to watch in the program. He decided to prove the listmakers wrong. "I told my brother [Penn foilist David Cohen] that I was going to win the tournament," Yale said. "I really wanted to win, but I was surprised. Most of the people I beat I had lost to during the regular season." David Cohen almost ruined his brother's winning streak when the two faced each other in the final round -- Yale was down 4-0 before making a comeback and winning the bout, 5-4. Though his brother is just a freshman, David was not surprised by Yale's final placement. "The people we fenced at regionals are the same people we've fenced for the last seven years," David said. "If [Yale] was better than them before college, he'll be better than them now." David Cohen finished sixth in the foil event, ensuring himself a spot in the NCAAs. Yale Cohen wasn't the only Quaker with a first-place finish -- junior sabre Michael Golia tied with Penn State's Aaron Stuewe and Michael Stahlhut for first. A fencer must finish in the top six of his weapon to qualify for NCAAs, so rather than fencing for first place, the sabres flipped a coin to determine placement. Golia was given third place, even though he beat both Stuewe and Stahlhut. "They're very slippery," Golia said of his opponents from Happy Valley. "But I fenced well enough to qualify for NCAAs, and that's all that matters." In the epee event, Penn's Charles Hamann and Javier Garcia-Albea finished fifth and sixth respectively, earning themselves bids to the NCAAs. Despite his strong finish, Hamann's performance was shaky in the first two rounds. Though he made it to the finals, he had to win five out of six bouts in the second half of the final round to finish in the top six. Hamann did what he needed to do and pulled off five nearly consecutive victories against fencers from Princeton and Penn State. "It was a home stretch sort of thing," Penn coach Dave Micahnik said of Hamann's performance. "He started to put his game together and he won key bouts." Garcia-Albea won five bouts against fencers from Rutgers, Princeton and Penn State to secure his sixth-place finish. The Quakers qualified five men out of a possible six for the NCAAs -- a team can send two fencers from each weapon. A school's final placement at the championships depends on the total number of points scored by both the men's and women's teams, and since the Penn women are only sending two fencers to the NCAAs, Micahnik is understandably disappointed that the men did not qualify another sabre. "We'll do our best, of course, but any school with 10 or 12 fencers has an advantage," Micahnik said. "If everyone does wonderfully, we'll have a chance for the trophy."


With elections approaching, UA continuing with projects

(03/22/00 10:00am)

Though their terms will officially end in less than a month, the members of the Undergraduate Assembly are still actively pursuing projects they hope will make student life better on campus. At last night's meeting, the UA discussed many of their ongoing projects, including community service events with other student organizations and campus security. College senior and UA chairman Michael Silver emphasized that the UA would have to stay active in order to meet the needs of the student body until the end of their terms. "In the past years it's been implied that [the time between] spring break and the transition period is a 'dead period' for the UA," Silver said after the meeting. He added, however, that this year is different, since the UA is still working on several ongoing projects. For the next three weekends, the UA will be coordinating Quaker Corps -- a tree-planting community service event that will include participants from other student government groups on campus. Quaker Corps will include tree planting by the Health Center on 43rd and Chester streets, and other nearby areas. The initiative is an extension of Ivy Corps, a community service day planned for all Ivy league schools on April 8. The UA decided that instead of choosing one day for community service, they would devote three -- this Saturday, as well as April 2 and April 8. "[We] hope to get everyone out there and bridge the gap between Penn and the surrounding community," UA member and College freshman David Levin said after the meeting. Levin added that PennPals, Habitat for Humanity and various Greek organizations will be participating in the event. The United Minorities Council has also been invited to participate this Saturday. Safety issues, which have not been at the forefront of the UA's agenda this year, were also discussed last night. "We haven't paid attention to safety at all this year," Silver said. Several UA members met with University Police Chief Maureen Rush and Interim Special Services Director Patricia Brennan before spring break to discuss campus safety issues. The UA expressed student concerns about the lack of Spectaguard patrols on 39th and Sansom streets, as well as the frequency of bike thefts. The UA plans to work with University Police to encourage bike registration and on other security issues on campus. Silver also mentioned that next week's meeting has been moved to Monday in order to accommodate a special guest -- former mayor and current Democratic National Committee chairman Ed Rendell. Rendell, a Penn alum who is teaching two Urban Studies courses this semester, will attend the meeting to informally share his experiences in student government -- he was vice-chairman of the men's student government as a student at Penn in the 1960s-- and observe the UA's activities. With campaigning and elections just around the corner, a majority of UA members -- about 50 to 60 percent -- say they plan to run for re-election in the upcoming weeks.


Jabbing their way through Philadelphia

(03/22/00 10:00am)

Art Casciato knows his fair share of Philadelphia boxers, ranging from the Joe Fraziers to the Rocky Balboas and all the contenders and pretenders in between. Hoping to expose some of the city's storied boxing history to Penn students, the Harrison College House dean organized a trip for seven residents to visit the gymnasiums where many of Philadelphia's famed boxers got their start. The program was part of the house's "Finding Philly" series, which takes students to some of the less traditional but perhaps more fascinating places in the city. And yesterday, in between the sweat, punching bags and headgear, students got to see a side of Philadelphia far away from Locust Walk. The mood was set the moment local boxing instructor Ron Aurit arrived in the Harrison lobby to join Casciato and the students. Aurit, who led the tour of the gyms, offered hearty greetings of, "Where are you from?" to each of the students. No matter the city, Aurit replied with a five-minute anecdote about anything from a championship fight that took place in the particular town to a favorite hotel bar located there. En route to the first stop -- the Front Street Gym -- the stories flew like punches from Aurit's past. Aurit told the students that he is actually the answer to the Trivial Pursuit question, "Who is the only Jewish boxer to have fought Sugar Ray Leonard?" The self-proclaimed "Yid Kid" laughed as he recalled taunting the former champion, "Is that all you got, Sugar?" when he was unable to knock him out. At the Front Street Gym, the entrance is an unmarked door that opens to a narrow staircase and leads up to a boxer's haven, complete with a trainer named Angel, walls plastered in posters of previous fights and an obstacle course of punching bags. "The gym is so different from what you picture it as being," said College senior Ada Stein, referring to the fact that the gym seemed to lack the glitz and glamour so often seen on television. The next stop was the Joe Frazier Gym. The limousine parked out front seemed to indicate that the owner and namesake of the place -- the former heavyweight slugger -- was in. His son Marvis greeted the group and stuck around to sign autographs. In Frazier's office hung what Aurit described as "the best photo ever taken" of Frazier knocking out none other than Muhammad Ali. The final stop was Champs, a North Philadelphia gym. Located right across from Bill Cosby's former elementary school, the gym is touted as the home of some of Philadelphia's finest boxers. Currently training at the gym is middleweight champion Bernard "The Executioner" Hopkins and welterweight champion Tony Martin. Champs also claims John Prin, Penn's own boxing club president. Finally, the knockout tour of Philadelphia's boxing world was complete with a visit to Nick's sandwich shop in South Philadelphia. Aurit, who has been teaching boxing skills to Penn students since 1976, then took the opportunity to pass out flyers for those interested in his boxing scholarships. He said part of his mission is to help adolescents make it to college, and he touts the benefits of boxing for many kids who might otherwise be left to the streets. "We all agreed we learned about the sport, and the people and culture of boxing," Casciato said. "The tour Ron gave wasn't sugar-coated."


M. Golf struggles with rust, bad weather on spring trip

(03/22/00 10:00am)

There was some sun but not much fun for the Penn men's golf team on its spring break trip to the South. The Quakers first traveled to West Palm Beach, Fla., where they played four consecutive days under friendly blue skies. Penn capped off its vacation in Greenville, N.C., where the Quakers encountered some rough times in some nasty weather at the East Carolina Invitational. "As a whole, we played pretty terribly," junior Todd Golditch said. On the first day of competition, the Quakers fared pretty well with a four-man total of 306. Kyle Moran fired the low round of two-over-par 74. Rising freshman star Chad Perman posted a 77, as did sophomore Trey Best. Mike Russell shot six-over 78, and Golditch posted a 79. There were certainly signs of rust as the Quakers played their first tournament since the fall. "It takes a while to get back into it," Golditch said. "I haven't played [competitively] since October. I played maybe once or twice over winter break." The tourney was supposed to be a 54-hole event, but Friday's morning 18 was canceled due to rain. On the final 18 holes on Saturday, Mother Nature showed her might by inflating the Quakers' scores. "It was 40 degrees and very windy," Golditch said. "It's hard to do well when your hands are red. You can't feel a thing, and you are wearing five layers of clothes." Golditch was right. His team shot a 322 on Saturday, 18 strokes worse than Friday. Perman shot the low round for the Quakers with a four-over 76. Moran posted a 78; Best and Golditch both shot 84; and Russell shot 85. Though Penn finished pretty far back in the field, the East Carolina Invitational is by no means a measuring stick for determining future performances. The Quakers were pitted against a very strong field with teams from different districts. Most of the teams from the South have played year-round and have already competed in several tournaments prior to the East Carolina Invitational. "It's difficult to compete against schools like Virginia Tech and Maryland," Golditch said. "The Southern schools are traditionally better golf schools." The Quakers will play next weekend at the George Washington Invitational in Rehoboth Beach, Del. Although Penn has never competed in this tournament, the Quakers' outlook is positive. "I think we can work out the kinks that haunted us at ECU," Moran said. "I think we will do really well this weekend. We will be competing against teams in our district who are in similar positions as we are." According to Moran, this spring break was important not only for gearing up for the season, but also for getting closer with his Penn teammates. "We had some strong new bonds develop between the upperclassmen and the freshmen," Moran said. "The team is all on the same page. We have the same goals for the season." Moran does believe that to some extent, golf is a team sport. He said he feels comfortable around his team and confident in its ability. "We can all go to each other for advice on our swing or course management," Moran said. "We are really all very good friends." The Quakers hope to ride their friendship and technical prowess to an Ivy League championship. This year marks the first year for the winner of the Ivies to continue on to the NCAA Championships.


Stats show rise in campus crimes

(03/22/00 10:00am)

But Penn police attribute the increase to a growth in their patrol area. Campus crime statistics released this week by the Division of Public Safety show significant increases in several categories of crime over the past three years, including robbery, simple assaults and auto thefts. But according to University Police officials, the statistics -- the release of which is mandated by both federal and state law -- don't paint an accurate picture of the crime situation on campus. Specifically, they say, the increased number of 1999 incidents reflects the growth of police jurisdiction and several key changes in reporting procedures. "The reason for our increased numbers isn't an increase in crime," University Police Deputy Chief of Investigations Thomas King said. "It was just a matter of the change in [Department of Education] reporting requirements." Congress passed legislation in 1998 designed to close loopholes allowing colleges and universities to underreport campus crime by claiming that many incidents occurred in what is technically off campus. Penn was the subject of a year-long federal government investigation into its crime reporting procedures in 1997. That review found several minor violations into reporting procedures, but absolved the University of charges that it had systematically covered up campus crime. According to the statistics -- which count campus-wide crime according to the nature of the offense -- the number of on-campus incidents has increased in general over the past three years, with robberies rising by 29 occurrences since last year, thefts by 246 and simple assaults by 14. But officials said the higher statistics reflect an expansion of the University Police's patrol area as well as an increase in reports brought about by some ambiguities in new reporting terminology. "Most of the changes involved new federal definitions of what was campus and what was not," University Police Chief Maureen Rush said. "The changes in breakdown made things somewhat more complicated, but we still reported those crimes affecting the University covered by the Uniform Crime Report." "The numbers look deceptively higher," King added. "We're more inclusive about counting [crimes] inside our geographic area." He said the police are responding to the regulatory changes by cautiously reporting crimes previously considered out of jurisdiction. "We're absolutely going beyond the requirements to make sure we're in compliance," King said. "This is very much a transition for the DOE requirements as we all try to figure out the meaning of [geographic reporting guidelines] like 'adjacent' and 'reasonably contiguous.'" The numbers are especially misleading, officials say, because the crime rate in the campus neighborhood has actually been falling dramatically in recent months. "Major crime is definitely down," King said. "[The actual crime rate] is really impressive." Police are so pleased with the drop in violent crimes like homicide and aggravated assault, in fact, that they have been able to spend more resources in the fight against smaller, quality of life-related incidents. "We're at the point right now where we're really concentrating on thefts from inside buildings," King said. "Our robberies are way down, as are our aggravated assaults. Any student-related assaults are virtually non-existent, where we used to have a high percentage of alcohol-related incidents. Burglary has been on the decrease as well." Police further say one of the tools they plan to employ in the fight against minor crimes is education. "An obscenely high percentage of internal thefts, 95 percent or more, are the result of items left unattended," King said. "We're trying hard to increase awareness in that area."


M. Lax mauls Leopards to move past .500

(03/22/00 10:00am)

The Quakers pummeled Lafayette, 20-5, after going 1-2 during break. While most of the student body was either relaxing at home or on a tropical island over spring break, the Penn men's lacrosse team was hard at work on the field. The Quakers played three games during the week off and one more yesterday, going 2-2 in that span. Penn started off the week with an overtime win against Bucknell, but then dropped two to North Carolina and Yale, before winning yesterday in convincing fashion against Lafayette. "We're playing OK right now, not terrific," Penn coach Marc Van Arsdale said. "We have ups and downs within each game." With its record at 2-2, yesterday's contest against a weaker Lafayette squad was a crucial one, and Penn passed with flying colors, demolishing the Leopards, 20-5. "We had come out a little slow in past games, and we wanted to take [yesterday] to work on starting faster and we were able to accomplish that," co-captain Pete Janney said. The Quakers jumped out to a quick 9-0 advantage on the backs of the defense that held Lafayette scoreless throughout the first half. Along with the contribution from the backline, the entire team played well. Midfielder Billy Sofield won 80 percent of the face-offs, and goalie John Carroll regained the form that helped Penn win its first two games of the season. "Today, every ground ball was ours," senior co-captain Bill Fowler said. "The defense put pressure on the ball from the beginning. That caused a lot of turnovers, and the offense was able to run right through their defensive line." Scott Solow led the team with three goals, while junior Todd Minerley tallied six assists and a goal. Solow netted two of his goals early in the game during the 9-0 run. "It felt really good to beat up on somebody," freshman midfielder Alex Kopicki said. "We don't have too many easy wins on our schedule, and while we didn't take that attitude going into the game, once we got going, it was nice." The Quakers' first opponent of spring break was Bucknell, which Penn had beaten 11-8 when the teams met last spring. Playing the contest in a driving rain in Baltimore on March 11, the Red and Blue trailed from the start and were down 2-1 at halftime. The Quakers were also behind going into the fourth quarter, but rallied to tie the score at four and send the game into overtime. In the extra period, Kopicki took the ball from the top of the crease past his defender, forcing another defender to cover him. Kopicki passed the ball to a wide-open Solow, who scored the goal from 10 feet away to give Penn the win. "The Bucknell game was a good, physical game," Fowler said. "They felt like they could play with us, and we quietly fought back to take it." In the next game at UNC on March 14, the fourth quarter result was not as gratifying. The Quakers spotted the Tar Heels a 5-2 lead, but stormed back in the third quarter to take a 6-5 advantage. "The third quarter of the North Carolina game was the best 12 minutes of lacrosse this season," Van Arsdale said. "We had their frontline really struggling." The UNC offense wouldn't struggle for long, however. The Tar Heels bounced back, netting six goals in a row to eventually win, 13-7. The turning point seemed to come in the beginning of the fourth quarter. With the game knotted at six, UNC All-American Todd Maher took the ball from the midline all the way down the field and scored. "It was just a breakdown of team play," Fowler said of the fourth-quarter collapse. "The energy was there, and the teamwork was there. They just kept getting one goal after another, and we were unable to stop the momentum." While the UNC loss was discouraging, the loss to Yale on Saturday was more disappointing. "Against Yale we were overworked and were forced to play from behind," Van Arsdale said. "In this sport, play is determined when balls are on the ground, and they made plays on the 50-50 balls and we didn't." The Quakers went down 6-1 early on, but managed to claw back to tie the score, 8-8. Nevertheless, Penn never held a lead and lost, 11-10. "We came ready to play, but they seemed to have more effort and came ready to win," Fowler said. While Penn was happy with yesterday's win, it knows that it still has room to grow. "We didn't take full advantage of scoring opportunities," Janney said. "There were times during the game that we could have shot the ball on goal and didn't, and we need to work on that." With the win, Penn improves its record to 3-2. Yet with four out of the next five games against Ivy opponents, the Quakers know that wins are not going to come easily.


Softball no-hit on rocky trip to open year

(03/22/00 10:00am)

Penn won four of its first eight, but lost six straight to close out their stay in Florida over break. The 2000 Penn softball season got off to a hectic start over spring break as the team traveled to Florida to compete in two tournaments and a total of 14 games. The break started well enough, with the Quakers winning four of their first eight games. After that, however, Penn faltered, losing six straight games to finish up the break at 4-10. On the first day of Penn's second tournament, the squad fell victim to a no-hitter in a 4-0 loss to Western Kentucky. The near-perfect game by Katie Swertfager was the first no-hitter in Lady Toppers history. Swertfager walked sophomore Clarisa Apostol to open the game and hit freshman Deb Kowalchuk before retiring the next 21 in a row. Penn freshman pitcher Becky Ranta had a strong outing but found herself a hard-luck loser, giving up three runs in six innings of work. "I think we have to put this into perspective because we have eight freshmen including four in the starting lineup," Penn sophomore Jen Moore said. "Our team is really young and we played some big teams." In the final game of the break, Penn lost 5-0 against Tennessee Tech. In that game, Penn senior co-captain Michelle Zaptin threw four scoreless innings but gave up one run in the fifth and struggled in the sixth, giving up four runs and eventually taking the loss. "It is never fun to lose, but we played some really tough teams and that should help us prepare for the rest of the season," Zaptin said. "Nobody likes a six-game losing streak, but we are confident that we can turn it around this weekend." Despite the 10 losses, the Quakers do have some reasons to be optimistic. Ranta had an excellent start to her collegiate career. She won her first three starts to account for three of the four total Penn victories. "To have a freshman come in and perform like that right away is very exciting," Penn coach Carol Kashow said. "I thought that overall the freshmen showed a lot of maturity and handled themselves well on defense against a lot of base-runners." Other strong performers for Penn were sophomore second baseman Jamie Pallas and senior first baseman Kari Dennis who were solid on defense and at the plate. "I'm taking a lot more good than bad out of these games," Kashow said. "The second tournament was very difficult and we knew that going in. We should play well this weekend and hopefully raise our record to .500." Penn's most consistent hitter over the break was returning first team All-Ivy selection Moore. She led the Quakers with a .500 batting average over the first week of the season. "I kind of felt like I wasn't always getting my hits when I should have, but I did get a couple of RBI," Moore said. "My defense wasn't the best, though, and that's what I pride my game on." With so many freshmen in the starting lineup, the Quakers' somewhat slow start in the Sunshine State is understandable. The hope for Penn is that, as the young players become more accustomed to the collegiate level, the team will drastically improve. "We definitely have a ton of freshmen starting at key positions like shortstop and catcher," Zaptin said. "I think they did a really good job overall and they didn't get discouraged when they would make mistakes." Penn's most daunting task of the break came against 20th-ranked Illinois-Chicago. The Quakers showed promise early on, taking a quick 2-0 lead. Unfortunately for Penn, the Flames turned up the heat after that and ended up clobbering the Quakers, 10-2. This weekend, Penn will play three doubleheaders, starting on Friday against Lafayette. The Quakers will then play doubleheaders against La Salle and Rider the next two days. "I think we're all planning on winning all six games this weekend and getting back on a high-note before the Ivy season starts," Zaptin said. "We need to get some of our confidence back and just continue to improve."


Panhel donates money to cancer center

(03/22/00 10:00am)

Contributing to a women's cause at Penn, the Panhellenic Council presented the Penn Cancer Center with a check for $1,150 Monday, which will go toward the Rena Rowan Breast Health Center, slated to open in the fall. Panhel raised the money for the Breast Health Center -- Panhel's official philanthropic effort -- through an event called Panhel at the Palestra. Sorority sisters sold tickets to the March 3 Penn basketball game and donated $2 from every ticket to the center. Panhel also held a tug of war between the sororities during halftime. At the check presentation, Panhel President Jennifer Chanowitz, a Sigma Delta Tau sister, talked about why Panhel chose to become involved with the Breast Health Center. "As the largest women's organization on Penn's campus, we wanted to choose a cause for which women could not only donate money but also their time," Chanowitz, a College junior, said. Cancer Center Executive Director Beverly Ginsburg praised Panhel's choice of a charitable cause, stressing the need for student involvement with the Cancer Center. "The more the center integrates with the University community, the more it can serve that community," she said. Ginsburg also talked about the impact that breast cancer has on the sufferer's family. "[The woman is] the one who carries the weight, the burden of the family," she said. "So she's facing breast cancer, but she still has to tend to her children and her husband and her aging mother." The new center -- which will be located on the 14th floor of the Penn Tower Hotel -- will provide oncologists, a cancer rehabilitation team, a plastic surgeon, a nutritionist and psychological counselors. There will also be a boutique selling wigs, scarves, prostheses and medical books and journals. The Breast Health Center is named for Rena Rowan, one of the owners of the fashion designing company Jones New York. Rowan is a breast cancer survivor who was treated at Penn's Cancer Center. According to Ginsburg, the money donated by Panhel will go toward the purchase of CD players and CDs to be placed next to each chemotherapy chair in the Breast Health Center. Panhel plans to continue its fundraising efforts with the Dance for a Cure dance-a-thon on April 8, which will be cosponsored by the InterFraternity Council and the Bicultural InterGreek Council. And in the fall, Panhel will hold its second annual Pumpkin Chase 5k run, donating all proceeds to the center.


Two wins for W. Lax after triumph on Main Line

(03/22/00 10:00am)

Penn exceeded last season's win total in a 14-7 rout of Villanova yesterday afternoon. VILLANOVA, Pa. -- Amid a deluge of rain at Villanova Stadium yesterday afternoon, the Penn women's lacrosse team unleashed a flood of its own. On the strength of five unanswered goals to close out the first half, the Quakers recovered from an early deficit and downed the Wildcats, 14-7. Penn (2-1) was led by sophomore Traci Marabella and freshman Crissy Book, who each netted four goals. The pair combined to score three times in a critical two-minute stretch in the first half, as the Quakers came out of a timeout and quickly turned a 3-2 deficit into a 5-3 lead. Penn never relinquished that advantage. "I told them that they had to do the easy things," Penn coach Karin Brower said of that timely timeout. "The passing and the catching. We've got to have the ground balls, and we've got to want the ground balls. And it shouldn't be a 3-2 game at that point -- that's basically what I said." Villanova (2-5), whose leading scorer, Cecily Pierce, was out with a pulled hamstring, was unable to generate any consistent offense. Wildcats freshman Meghan Carolan scored three goals, and senior Molly O'Conor added a pair, but the rest of the home squad could not break free of Penn's double-teaming on defense and put the ball in the net. "I think we got off to a very good start, but we let them come back on us," Villanova coach Joanie Milhous said. "There were a lot of turnovers in the midfield. And then I think we started playing very soft." With a sloppy game on both sides due to wet field conditions of near-biblical proportions, the speedy Quakers were able to come up with the majority of ground balls and turn them into attacking opportunities. Marabella and freshman Christy Bennett were two Penn players who excelled in this capacity. "The biggest thing with Traci that I liked is that today she really came back defensively, and so she came up with a lot of turnovers," Brower said. "And Christy Bennett had a great game. She pretty much dominated the turnovers. We got so many good turnovers because of her -- she came up with drops, double-teams, checks, interceptions." Marabella, who leads Penn with 10 goals on the season, almost did not make yesterday's game, showing up late for the team van due to a doctor's appointment. But Brower refused to leave West Philadelphia without the sophomore attacker -- a move that paid dividends early and often. Marabella scored 2:02 into the contest to put Penn up, 1-0, the first of her three first-half tallies. "For some reason, today was the first game that I wasn't nervous," Marabella said. With the temperature hovering around 40 degrees and wind-driven rain blowing in the players' faces, the conditions were less than ideal. "The weather sucked, but for some reason I like playing in the rain," Marabella said. "I don't know why, but I feel like I play better in the rain. Most people think of it as a disadvantage when it's raining and the conditions are horrible, but for some reason I like it." The Wildcats -- fresh off a 19-10 thrashing of La Salle on Sunday -- also came out hustling, scoring a pair of early goals to go up, 2-1. But Villanova struggled to clear the ball out of its end all day, and goalie Kelly O'Leary's 13 saves simply were not enough. Goalkeeper Christian Stover made nine big saves for the Quakers, none more important than one that came with 11 minutes left in the first half. With Penn up 5-3, a Wildcats attacker came in alone following a Penn turnover in their own end. But her shot was turned away by Stover, who held 'Nova scoreless for a 25-minute period. "Penn started to double-team us, and we just didn't respond to the double-team," Milhous said. "We didn't get it together in the midfield, and our attack didn't really go hard to goal." The Quakers' freshmen were a major part of the team's success. Midfielder Alison Polk-Williams notched one goal, attacker Kate Murray netted two and Bennett added another. Attacker Brooke Jenkins and midfielder Emily Foote, a DP sportswriter, also got into the scoring for the Quakers. Penn has now doubled its win total from a year ago with two victories.


Penn honors 10 TAs for teaching excellence

(03/22/00 10:00am)

Undergraduates will provide nominations for the new award, which will provide $500 to 10 outstanding TAs. As the grunt workers at every university, teaching assistants do almost everything from holding recitations and labs to copying and grading exams. Now, the graduate students who especially shine in these duties can be recognized by the very people whom they teach and inspire: undergraduates. Following the success of an award to a TA last year, University President Judith Rodin decided to make $5,000 available to acknowledge not one, but 10 TAs with amounts of $500 each. Undergraduates can nominate their favorite TAs for the award through the next two weeks and the winners will be announced in late April. Organizers say the awards are especially significant because they come not from their departmental bosses, but from the efforts of the students whom the TAs directly affect. "It's an award established from below instead of initiated from the top," award committee chairperson and History Professor Walter Licht said. In order to win the prize, TAs have to be nominated by an undergraduate who must write a short recommendation commenting on how the TA has impacted their academic experience. As Licht noted, however, the impact need not be restricted to how they perform in the classroom. In fact, the committee will not only look at how a TA has been especially innovative in bringing the class material to life, but also how they might have moved their students toward pursuing further study in the field, Licht said. The deadline for submitting a nomination is April 4 and students can send in a letter, an e-mail or visit the Web site at http://pobox.upenn.edu/~taprize. "The whole idea is that it's nominated by and focused on undergraduates," Graduate Student Association Council President and Wharton doctoral candidate Eric Eisenstein said. Licht, a one-time graduate dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, said that he was inspired by a graduate student to pursue History. "I know when I ask my colleagues, 'Why did you decide to do this?' invariably there is a TA mentioned," Licht said. The award committee will represent all four undergraduate schools and will be composed of a faculty representative, two undergraduates and four representatives from GSAC. Eisenstein hopes that last year's recipient will sit on the committee and that winners will continue to be involved in future years. Following the undergraduate nomination, the committee will ask for a personal statement from the candidates and then request that a faculty member testify to their professional and personal qualities. "The undergraduates agree that this is important because these are their TAs and the graduate students believe that this is important because this is a big part of what we do and what we will be doing when we become professors," Eisenstein said.


Greek life changing after death

(03/22/00 10:00am)

The number of registered fraternity parties has dropped dramatically since Michael Tobin's death last year. Just a few short years ago, Penn students could have their pick of at least three or four fraternity parties on any given Friday or Saturday night. Now, there are rarely more than a few fraternity parties in a weekend, much less in a single evening. Although the nature of Penn's Greek culture has been slowly evolving over the past few years, the alcohol-related death of 26-year-old Phi Gamma Delta alumnus Michael Tobin a year ago yesterday served as the catalyst for rapid changes to the Greek system. Tobin's death prompted a widespread evaluation of Penn's rules regarding drinking, resulting in a stricter alcohol policy that has changed the nature and frequency of fraternity parties on campus. Under the new rules, Greeks say large, blow-out parties are all but extinct due to the strict regulations. And many say that as the number of fraternity parties diminishes, the number of unregulated parties increases. Tobin was found dead during the early morning hours of March 21, 1999, following a FIJI alumni dinner. Four days later, University President Judith Rodin instituted a temporary ban on alcohol at all registered campus parties -- igniting campus-wide uproar, with students organizing a mass protest on College Green. During the five-week alcohol ban, Provost Robert Barchi led a committee of students, faculty and administrators that drafted recommendations for a new alcohol policy. While the policy applies to the entire campus, Greeks at the time voiced concerns that as the main organizers of on-campus parties they would be unfairly penalized for Tobin's death. InterFraternity Council leaders, who were a part of the Working Group on Alcohol Abuse, stressed throughout the process that fraternity parties were among the safer places for students to drink at Penn. Many expressed worries that under a new, stricter policy, parties would just be pushed to unsafe, off-campus locations. According to former IFC President Mark Metzl, a College senior, fraternity parties, "even in the old system, were the safest places to imbibe in the world." And former IFC Executive Vice President Andrew Exum, a College senior and Daily Pennsylvanian columnist, said students tend to drink more at private parties or in their dorm rooms than at fraternity parties. "From a practical standpoint, you run more of a risk binge drinking behind closed doors than fighting with 300 people for a beer at a crowded fraternity party," the Sigma Nu brother said. But those crowded fraternity parties have thinned out over the past semester as the new policy demands stricter carding rules and tighter enforcement. The new alcohol policy calls for a 1 a.m. serving deadline of alcohol at all undergraduate parties and a total ban on hard alcohol. The new policy also strengthened and expanded the existing monitoring system. Every registered party now has at least one of the University's approximately 30 trained monitors -- all of whom are Penn graduate students -- checking it during the course of the evening. Still, Alcohol Policy Coordinator Stephanie Ives stressed that the new policy was "very carefully worded," so as not to single out the Greeks as targets. But former Sigma Alpha Mu President Michael Kraver, who served on the WGAA, said that the correlation between the Greeks and alcohol could not be avoided. "The bottom line is, right or wrong, the Greeks are associated with the alcohol policy," said Kraver, now a first-year Penn Law student. Kraver did note, however, that the administration included Greek input as it reshaped the policy. Barchi said that the University does not want to get rid of the Greek system, explaining that the Tobin tragedy was only a sign of a larger campus-wide problem. "I think that Tobin's tragic death was just an indication of problems that were pervasive in the system as a whole," Barchi said. "It's not a question of suspending a fraternity -- it's a question of changing the culture." If the drinking culture has not changed, the Greek culture certainly has, with the numbers of on-campus parties down and the stringent rules, for the most part, being enforced. Wharton senior Martin Park, who was president of FIJI before the fraternity gave up its charter last spring, said he can see the changes on campus. Fraternities "don't want to have parties because they don't want to get in trouble," Park said. He also maintained that the new rules "don't let you have a fun party -- you can't have a real party." Many Greeks now say that drinking has been moved off campus to unmonitored locations, as they feared initially. As for the future of FIJI at Penn, the brothers agreed upon forfeiting their charter that the fraternity would not be allowed to recolonize until all current brothers had graduated. But Park believes that FIJI's national organization will try and bring the chapter back eventually, and that many men will be interested in joining. Park also emphasized that the death at FIJI was not the sole reason for the change in policy. "It was a whole string of events, not just what happened last year," he said. "People have to understand -- policies were changing from the day I got here four years ago." Ives agreed. "If you look at the national picture, at Greek life at campuses around the country, there are many similarities, although not all campuses have had a tragedy like we have," she said. And Metzl said he believes that the necessary reevaluation of the fraternity system has strengthened the Greeks and improved their prospects for the future. "We stand on much more solid ground than we did in February of last year," he said.


Penn alum speaks on careers in journalism

(03/22/00 10:00am)

Michael Bamberger, a 'Sports Illustrated' writer, spoke at Penn last night. Penn students have told Michael Bamberger that he was lucky to have attended Penn 20 years ago, since today, his SAT scores might be too low for him to be accepted. Regardless, the Sports Illustrated senior writer jokingly maintained that he's at least as smart as the 35 students who came to the Kelly Writers House last night because they, not he, braved the pouring rain just to receive some words of advice from a writer. Bamberger, a 1982 Penn graduate, came to the Writers House as part of the Alumni Writers Series. Bamberger discussed the roots of his budding writing career which began in the office of The Daily Pennsylvanian in 1980 when he wrote an article about students scalping tickets for a Bruce Springsteen concert at the Philadelphia Spectrum. "Read as much as you can, write as much as you can," Bamberger advised students interested in pursuing a career in writing. He appears to have taken his own advice, as his portfolio includes newspaper and magazine articles, sports novels and a play. Before arriving at Sports Illustrated -- where he has been a senior writer since 1995 -- Bamberger wrote for The Philadelphia Inquirer for nine years. Spending as much time as possible with the subject of the piece is the best way to capture his or her personality, Bamberger said. He should know: In his career, Bamberger has profiled the likes of baseball superstar Mike Piazza, former Major League Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent and the entire 1999 World Cup-winning United States women's soccer team. He did, however, admit that it can be difficult -- and sometimes even impossible -- to make certain athletes receptive to the idea of being followed by a reporter. Take, for example, Baltimore Orioles outfielder Albert Belle, who is as well known for his clubhouse tirades as for his home run power. Bamberger told a laughing audience of an encounter he once had with the slugger. Belle would not speak to the reporter, leaving Bamberger to write a feature story for Sports Illustrated that used only one quote from the subject himself: "Sports Illustrated can kiss my black ass." "He viewed me as a parasite," Bamberger said. Bamberger went on to field questions ranging from Michael Jordan's relationship with Sports Illustrated in the early 1990s to Atlanta Braves pitcher John Rocker's controversial remarks made several months ago to the magazine. Bamberger repeatedly stressed that the most important responsibility of the writer and the publication is to the reader. Bamberger admitted problems may arise when a writer has spent time with a subject and develops a personal relationship with the source. The reporter, Bamberger said, must always maintain his or her integrity because that is the most important attribute that a writer can possess. But the discussion did not focus solely on sports. In fact, Bamberger also discussed the art of writing and reporting. After the talk, College sophomore Lenya Bloom called Bamberger's message "excellent." "He did a good job balancing between sports and all interests," Bloom said. College junior Todd Wise introduced Bamberger. "A lot of people in the Penn community are interested in sports," Wise said.


Mixed results against top competition for W. Tennis

(03/22/00 10:00am)

The Quakers beat two ranked teams, but fell to three more on their trip to the West. The five nationally ranked teams that the Penn women's tennis team played over spring break in California and Las Vegas might have all thought they would have no trouble sweeping the unranked Quakers. They were wrong. Penn overcame No. 68 UNLV and No. 44 Illinois State on March 12 and 13, respectively. And even though the Quakers lost handily to Oklahoma State, Fresno State and Stanford, Penn sophomore Carla Dorsey believed these matches were all closer than the scores may make them seem. "Their players aren't better athletes than us," Dorsey said of the killer trio. "But they play their big points a lot better. [On points] where we might get timid, they play it out. They have a lot more experience with big points, and it's the big points that count -- they're what make the scores look lopsided." Penn started out their West Coast matches by beating UNLV, 5-4. Penn captain Elana Gold said the Quakers were especially happy about beating the Rebels since they regularly vie with the best the Western conferences have to offer. The next day, the Quakers took Illinois State, 6-3. Gold's match was especially impressive. After losing the first set, 6-1, and being down 5-1 in the second set, she took the match to the third set and pulled off a win. No. 52 Oklahoma State gave Penn a little more trouble. At No. 6 singles, Penn sophomore Jolene Sloat didn't let the Cowboys' Cameron Stout win a single game, while Penn's Rochelle Raiss took Ashleigh Dolman, 6-1, 6-4. Raiss then teamed up with Penn junior Lenka Beranova to play doubles, and the duo overcame Dolman and Maria Galoustova, 8-4. The Quakers team of sophomore Louani Bascara and Anastasia Pozdniakova was tied at 8-8 before losing the match in a close tiebreaker. The next two schools the Quakers faced -- Fresno State and Stanford -- were probably the toughest teams they will see all season. Penn was unable to take a single match from either school. At No. 1 singles, Pozdniakova took Fresno State's Kandiss Creighton to three sets after falling 6-1 in the first set. Beranova lost her match by a close 7-5, 7-5 margin at No. 2 singles, while Justyna Wojas lost to the Bulldogs' Kelly Ramirez after a 7-5, 6-3 battle. Before heading home, the Quakers faced No. 1 Stanford at the Taube Family Tennis Stadium to challenge some of the top tennis players in the nation. "The whole atmosphere of playing the No. 1 team in the country in their stadium with a huge scoreboard was a little intimidating," Penn coach Michael Dowd said. "But we stepped up and played very well. We played some of the best tennis we played all year." At No. 3 singles, Penn junior Shubha Srinivasan faced Gabriela Lastra -- who is currently ranked No. 68 in the country -- in an intense three-hour battle. Srinivasan took the first set, 7-6, before Lastra came back and finished the match, 6-3, 6-4. "Shubha played an amazing match," Gold said. "[Playing Stanford] was fun, because we had nothing to lose." Doubles was the Quakers' strength in the Stanford match. Raiss and Beranova lost their close match at No. 1 doubles, 8-7, and Bascara and Pozdniakova fell, 8-5. Gold believes that the upcoming Ivy season -- which begins April 1 against Princeton -- almost looks easy after playing at such a high level of competition. "We all got a lot closer [over spring break]," she said. "When it comes down to four-all in an Ivy match and you feel united with your team, you're going to want it that much more for yourself and everyone else." But Dowd emphasized that the team can never get too satisfied with its performance. "We saw the highest level of competition we'll see all year. From here on out, we won't see teams as good as these," he said. "But the Ivy season is in the horizon, and we have to keep pushing."


W. Fencing sends youth to NCAAs

(03/21/00 10:00am)

The regular dual-meet season may be over for the Penn women's fencing team, but for two of the Quakers' top fencers, there is still much left to be accomplished. Freshman epeeist Kim Linton and fellow freshman foilist Lauren Staudinger advanced to the NCAA Championships with strong performances at the NCAA Mid-Atlantic/South Region Championships this past Sunday. Linton, seeded ninth going into the tournament based on her season performance, finished 11th in the Mid-Atlantic/South Regional on Sunday, making her the eighth-best epeeist in the region, based upon the NCAA's weighted rankings system. That result was good enough to make her one of the nine epeeists representing the Mid-Atlantic/South Region at the NCAA Championships this coming weekend at Stanford. Staudinger, who was seeded eighth, finished in seventh place in the region both for the tournament and overall on the season. She will also represent Penn at the NCAAs this weekend. "I'm glad that we have two [fencers] going," Penn coach Dave Micahnik said. "And the fact that they're freshmen gives them good experience for the future." Three other women also went to regionals, but were unable to qualify for the NCAAs. Sophomore sabre Abby Lifter made it to the final round but was stifled once she got there, finishing in 12th place. Freshman Christina Verigan, who was arguably Penn's top sabre fencer all year, went 1-4 in her pool and was knocked out in the first round, finishing in 19th place. Despite this poor result, Verigan remained optimistic for the future. "I have three more years to go -- I'll make it next year," she said. "Now I'm motivated to work over the summer and train harder in the off-season." Freshman foilist Stacey Wertlieb rounded out the field with a 13th-place finish for the Quakers. Seniors Amy Hozer and captain Heba Abdulla qualified for regionals, but they could not make it to State College, Pa., due to prior commitments. With the absence of these two upperclassmen, the weight was put on the shoulders of Penn's newcomers. Four freshmen and one sophomore represented the Quakers at regionals, forecasting a bright future for the Red and Blue. "I think that next year we will qualify more people for NCAAs," Verigan said. "Next season, I think that we'll be able to carry the team very well and uphold the tradition of high-quality fencing at Penn." Despite Penn's youth and inexperience, Micahnik was still unhappy with his team's results. The fact that the Quakers are only sending two fencers to the NCAAs gives them a handicap on coming away with a high finish at Stanford. Fencing powerhouses Penn State and Princeton are both sending the maximum of six fencers, giving them a sizeable advantage over Penn. "We needed to be a lot better," Micahnik said. "I was expecting much more." Staudinger, who was unhappy with a couple of her own losses, cited an extremely competitive field as the reason for the lack of Penn victories. "I think some more of our fencers deserved to go to NCAAs, but it was a really hard competition," she said. "It was too bad more of us didn't qualify." Nevertheless, Linton and Staudinger, the core of Penn's strong freshman class, will travel across the country and represent the Quakers, hoping to gain valuable experience for their next three years at Penn. "It's a reward for a good season, and it is a good steppingstone for the future," Micahnik said.


Baseball wins five of 10 on opening road trip to Florida

(03/21/00 10:00am)

In the land of oranges and senior citizens, another season began for the Penn baseball team last week. The Quakers kicked off their 2000 campaign with five wins and five losses on their Florida road trip over spring break. The Quakers' .500 record after their first 10 games constitutes a marked and encouraging improvement over last year, when they played their first nine games in California and finished 2-8 in their first 10. But Penn coach Bob Seddon is quick to point out that last year's early season schedule was much tougher than this year's. "This schedule, there were some tough teams, but it doesn't compare with last year's schedule," he said. "However, this is a much better team than last year's team. This team really has a future." The journey to that future began on March 10, when the Quakers opened the season against Florida Tech in Melbourne. Though the Quakers pounded out 11 hits -- three of them off the bat of senior catcher Jeff Gregorio, including a two-run triple in the seventh inning that put Penn ahead 8-4 -- their pitching and defense eventually abandoned them. The Quakers, who issued nine walks in the game, wilted in the eighth inning as freshman relief pitcher Ben Otero and fellow fireman Dan Fitzgerald -- who was hit with the loss -- walked four Panthers and hit two batters in the process of giving up six runs on the way to a 10-8 loss. "We let that game get away, mainly on pitchers who couldn't throw the ball over the plate," Seddon said. "Defensively, we had a good trip. We had a few errors in the first game. That didn't do us in. It was the wildness of our pitchers." The Quakers gained revenge against Florida Tech the next day as they outslugged the Panthers, 17-15. Freshman John McCreery and shortstop Glen Ambrosius, a senior tri-captain, hit homeruns in a nine-run fourth that erased a 7-0 deficit for the Quakers. Penn pitcher Matt Hepler left the game in the bottom of the inning after surrendering four runs without giving up a hit, but the Quakers went ahead for good in the next frame with seven runs -- including a triple off the bat of McCreery. On March 12, Penn traveled to Daytona and split a doubleheader, trouncing Northern Illinois, which went 4-51 in 1999, while falling to Northern Iowa -- the Quakers' best opponent on the trip -- in the day's second game, 5-3. In the first game, Ambrosius -- who is hitting .341 in 44 at-bats with a .500 slugging percentage -- launched a three-run homer in the first inning, and freshman Kevin Wells shut the door on Northern Illinois, giving up one run on one hit in 3 2/3 innings after relieving McCreery, who had given up four runs in 5 1/3 innings. Penn fell to 2-2 in the nightcap, as Northern Iowa's Brady Weber stroked an RBI single to break a 2-2 tie and put the Panthers on top for good. In the ninth, the Quakers threatened to tie the score when they had men on second and third with two outs. But left fielder Jim Mullen grounded hard to short, ending the game. The next night, Penn barely escaped with a win over Cortland State, 9-8. Junior Chris May tallied a triple and a homerun, the latter occurring in a fifth inning that saw the Quakers jump out to an 8-3 lead. Otero gave the Quakers a quality start, going six innings and giving up two earned runs. However, it took freshman Paul Grumet to shut down the surging Cortland State squad in the ninth to save the game for the Red and Blue. "He's got great potential," Seddon said of Otero. The Quakers split another doubleheader on March 14, as they fell to Tiffin in the first game, 8-6, before defeating Northern Illinois, 8-4, for the second time. In the latter game, sophomore Greg Lee was impressive in his first collegiate start, striking out 12 and giving up three runs in eight innings of work. "Greg Lee is a very, very pleasant addition," Seddon said. "He has emerged into a probable starting position. However, that was only one game. We'll see [him in his] next game." In Winter Park the next night, Penn fell to Rollins, 13-8, to fall to 4-4. Penn fell behind early, but cut a six-run deficit to one run before Rollins pinch hitter Ryan Park put the game away with a grand slam homerun in the bottom of the seventh. Sophomore catcher Brian Fitzgerald's solo homerun to left-center field in the top of the ninth lifted the Quakers to a 9-8 victory over Eckerd in St. Petersburg on March 16. But Penn fell back to .500 two days later, blowing a 7-5 lead in the ninth to Army in Tampa. Michael Cooper beat the Quakers with a one-out bases-loaded single in the ninth off of Otero, who suffered the loss after his strong showing against Cortland State. "We should have won another two games on the trip," Seddon said. "We didn't pitch. We have to pitch better to win in our league. We didn't hold opposing runners on well, and opponents stole on us far too frequently Those are the things we have to work on." However, this does not mean Seddon isn't happy with his team's performance. "Any time you come back even from Florida or any spring trip, you pretty much feel pretty good about that," he said. Seddon added that he was heartened by the Quakers' offensive production on the trip, as they averaged 8.5 runs per game. Penn will open its home season on Thursday, when it hosts St. Joseph's in the first game ever at the new stadium at Murphy Field.


W. Lax splits first two games

(03/21/00 10:00am)

The last time the Penn women's lacrosse team beat Yale was 1994, back when current freshmen Crissy Book and Kate Murray were in seventh grade. On Saturday at the Yale Bowl, Murray came within inches of changing that, hitting the goalpost with a shot with eight seconds remaining as the No. 10 Elis (3-0, 1-0 Ivy League) topped Penn, 9-8. Murray had earlier scored a goal in the game, and Book tallied two. After two games, Book is second on the Quakers (1-1, 0-1) with four goals. Penn defeated American (1-2) in the season opener last Tuesday, 17-8. "I think [the freshmen] are really doing a great job," Penn coach Karin Brower said. "They're really doing what they need to do." The freshmen scored 13 of Penn's 25 goals in the two games over spring break. Freshman Jayme Munnelly's late goal at Yale nearly broke down the Elis' stalling defense late in the game, bringing the Quakers to within one goal of overtime. Penn played from behind all day Saturday, falling behind by three goals in the first three minutes of action. "We knew that Yale was going to be the strongest team that we've come up against," Brower said. "The first three minutes didn't really shock me that they were up 3-0. I was surprised at how well we came back on a 3-0 deficit." The Quakers struck back, refusing to let the game get out of hand. Penn trailed 6-4 at halftime, and the Quakers defense clamped down on last year's Ivy League Rookie of the Year, Amanda Walton, who last year scored four goals against the Quakers and this year was held to three. Penn freshman Christy Bennett came off the bench to handle the responsibility of guarding Walton. "We had five freshmen starting," Brower said. "Bennett did a great job, and she's pretty much gone in and not come out since, so we pretty much have six freshmen out there who are really doing a nice job." Meanwhile, junior Amy Weinstein helped to hold Yale's other big gun on the attack, Heather Bentley, to just two goals on the day. "Our defense did really well," said Penn senior tri-captain Brooke Jenkins, who scored one goal against the Elis after a five-goal outburst at American. "They collapsed really well and stopped the other players." With her six goals, Jenkins is tied for the team lead with sophomore Traci Marabella, who is already halfway to her 12-goal total that was second on last year's Penn team. But this is a new year, and the Quakers have already matched their win total from a year ago. And such a close game on the road against a team as strong as Yale seems to have lit a fire under the Red and Blue going into today's game at Villanova. "They're enthusiastic -- real excited," Brower said. "I think after Yale they're even more excited because they've realized they can play with anybody." Penn certainly had no trouble with the Eagles after shaking off the opening-game jitters. The Quakers were only up by one goal until Jenkins found the net with 4:10 remaining in the first half to put her team up 5-3. After that, the rout was on. Penn scored three more goals in the half to the Eagles' one and scored the first three after intermission to put the game relatively out of reach at 11-4. Penn hit on 17-of-24 shots at American and is shooting at a 61 percent clip for the season's first two games, while holding its opponents to 46 percent shooting accuracy. Jenkins, Munnelly and freshman Dalton Cox have yet to miss a shot, while Marabella fanned on only one of her seven shots in the two games.


Traber named permanent CEO of Health System

(03/21/00 10:00am)

Peter Traber immediately ended Penn's relationship with the Hunter Group. After four weeks as interim head of the Penn Health System, Peter Traber received the job on a permanent basis last Friday and immediately announced that he was ending UPHS's engagement with a controversial health care management consulting firm. Traber will continue to act as interim dean of the Medical School during a nationwide search, which is required by University regulations. Officials say Traber is the frontrunner for that position. The Florida-based Hunter Group was brought in last July to recommend ways in which UPHS could slash its expenses. Last month, the firm's consultants were retained once again to help ease the administrative transition after the ouster of longtime CEO and dean William Kelley. In another administrative move Thursday, Robert Martin -- who resigned as chief operating officer of the Health System three weeks ago -- agreed to resume his role as COO. Officials yesterday confirmed that Martin had disagreed with the decision to use Hunter Group executives as consultants and that the release of the Hunter Group was a major factor in Martin's decision to return. In an e-mail announcing the appointment, Rodin called the 44-year-old Traber an able leader with a deep knowledge of the Health System. But he has not been named the permanent Medical School dean because University rules require that a national search be conducted before an academic dean is named. "Our trustees, medical faculty and staff have great confidence in him, as do I," she said. Traber said yesterday that he was pleased to be named permanent CEO of the troubled $1.9 billion Health System. "I'm very excited about it," he said. "It's good for the organization to have permanent leadership to move forward." Traber said he decided to end the engagement with the Hunter Group because he felt the firm was no longer needed. Barchi said yesterday that Hunter Group CEO David Hunter would remain available to Traber if his services are needed. The Hunter Group's engagement was, however, at least partly responsible for Martin's decision to resign. "He wasn't sure that the Hunter Group would have added value to the organization," Traber explained. In an e-mail sent out last Thursday, Traber called Martin "the best person for the job" of returning the Health System to financial stability. The Health System has incurred deficits totalling more than $300 million over the past three years. Neither Martin nor executives from the Hunter Group returned calls for comment yesterday. In his e-mail, Traber said UPHS has made progress in responding to its financial problems, but he said that having a single person as both dean and CEO is essential for the Health System to run smoothly, especially because of the Health System's role as the principal source of funding for the school. He said he is very interested in being considered as a candidate for the position. "The dean is the chief academic officer of the School of Medicine. To me that's the most important position," he said. "Being CEO is an important part? but that's not what I want to be alone." Officials have not given a timetable for when a dean could be named, but they have maintained that University rules require that a search committee be appointed before a dean can be selected. Barchi said yesterday that Traber will be a candidate for the position. "We have indicated that he would be seriously considered," he said. Health care analyst Joshua Nemzoff of New Hope-based Nemzoff and Co. said yesterday that some might interpret the fact that Traber was not named permanent dean as a possible precursor to a separation between UPHS and the Medical School. "You could read into it a little bit as whether the University is still going to spin the hospital off," he said. But Nemzoff added that the University could appoint a different dean and CEO without having intentions of separating from the Health System. He noted that Kelley's role as both CEO and dean is more the exception than the rule. "It's not exactly common for the guy who runs the health system to be dean of the medical school," he explained. Medical School Professor Harvey Friedman said he thought many faculty members would simply prefer that Traber be named dean. "The view of the faculty is that one good person making decisions is better than having two people making decisions because it's coordinated," Friedman said. Other Medical School professors said they hoped the faculty will be consulted in any decision concerning administration. "We certainly hope there will be faculty input," said Howard Herrmann, the chairman of the Medical School Faculty Senate's steering committee. Herrmann said the fact that Traber has remained interim dean does not imply that administrators are considering separation.


Civil rights guru eyes the prize

(03/21/00 10:00am)

The award-winning documentary Eyes on the Prize has become such an important bearer of the legacy of the civil rights movement that it is now incorporated into the curricula of high schools and colleges alike. Yesterday evening, the man who wrote the companion guide to the series told a group of about 20 students about how they, as individuals, can strive to be like the pioneers of one of the century's most galvanizing movements. Juan Williams was invited to speak by organizers of the Penn Humanities Forum, which is sponsoring the week-long program called Human Nature-Human Rights. It was fitting that Williams addressed the crowd yesterday, on the day the program was exploring the civil rights movement, since Eyes on the Prize chronicles it from its peaceful beginnings in 1954 to the more riotous times of 1968. At the beginning of yesterday's session, Deputy Provost Peter Conn called the week-long program "a preeminent venue for lectures, discussions and films where issues of the most academic and public significance are discussed." Williams' talk also included a film screening of three of the series' episodes: "Ain't Scared of Your Jails," "Bridge to Freedom" and "Back to the Movement." The three segments use live interviews, authentic video and media coverage of historic occurrences -- like the march from Selma, Ala., to Montgomery Ala., and the race riots in Watts and Detroit -- and effective use of voice-overs and music. In his nearly hour-long talk, Williams discussed the importance of individual involvement in such a movement. "Individuals with even the minimalist standard of strength can join in a coalition to achieve social change," Williams said. Williams, who is the host of National Public Radio's Talk of the Radio and a regular panelist on Fox News Sunday, emphasized that several of the acts of civil disobedience illustrated throughout the film helped produce some of the victories in equality that black Americans enjoy today. He told the story of Barbara Johns, a young African-American girl in the 1940s, who noticed racial inequality in the school system of Prince Edward's County, Va. She called numerous law officials -- including then-NAACP member Thurgood Marshall -- in an effort to call attention to the segregation. Through her hard work, she brought lawyers on her behalf to Virginia, and the case was later used as part of the famous 1954 Supreme Court decision, Brown v. Board of Education, that overturned the "separate but equal" edict. History Professor Thomas Sugrue, who offered opening remarks, called the film "a powerful act of remembrance." "It is a call to our conscience and a challenge to our complacency towards injustice in the United States," he said. Added College sophomore Sharon Appelbaum, one of the students in Sugrue's class on the 1960s, "I first saw portions of this film when I was in middle school and I remember the images of the fire hoses and police dogs being very strange and shocking to me."


Funds raised to beautify Clark Park

(03/21/00 10:00am)

Despite the chilly temperatures, government officials and community organization members ushered in spring yesterday morning by announcing their plans for funding to improve Clark Park, University City's largest public space. The Clark Park Renewal Project -- a joint effort by the University City District and the Friends of Clark Park -- is designed to increase the level of maintenance in the nine-acre park, located at 43rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, by raising $70,000 to hire private landscapers. "We have found out that everybody is willing to come together and make [this project] all that it could be," City Council majority leader Jannie Blackwell, whose district represents West Philadelphia, told the approximately 25 leaders of community organizations present. A sum of $25,000 has already been donated by many local organizations and businesses, including Penn. The Drumcliff Foundation -- a Philadelphia-based non-profit organization that supports environmental causes -- has pledged $20,000 for the next five years if the partnership sells $20,000 worth of tickets for the "Party for the Park" on May 4. "I'm not only optimistic that we're going to get to the $70,000. I think we're going to blow right past it," said John Fry, the chairman of UCD's board of directors and Penn's executive vice president. UCD Executive Director Paul Steinke cited the collaboration between a city agency, a community organization and a special services district as integral to the implementation of the renewal project. "Today, our partnership blossoms on the first day of spring, right here in Clark Park," Steinke said. Up until a month ago, Clark Park was maintained by the Philadelphia Department of Recreation and volunteers from the Friends of Clark Park, who continually planted, watered and weeded. But according to District 9 Manager of the Department of Recreation Vincent Pancetta, applications for permits have shot up over the last year. Pancetta pointed out that the park's popularity has increased, as it is now home to a Farmer's Market, local soccer leagues, festivals and a large number of neighbors who come to enjoy the open space, trees and flowers. "Those of us who live in West Philadelphia recognize the good things we have," said State Rep. James Roebuck, who was at the briefing. "Clark Park is one of those good things." However, as more community members frequent Clark Park, wear and tear on the green spaces also increased. So in 1999, the Philadelphia Department of Recreation approved a plan constructed by the Friends of Clark Park and UCD that is going into action this month. Moon Site Management was selected through a bidding process as the new private landscape contractor for Clark Park. Cynthia Roberts, president of the Friends of Clark Park, said Moon Site Management will supplement the work provided by the Department of Recreation by trimming, mulching and pruning the greenery. "This is just one step of many, many steps in creating the kind of community we want to have in West Philadelphia," University of the Sciences President Philip Gerbino said.