Search Results


Below are your search results. You can also try a Basic Search.




Rodin and Chodorow: Year One

(09/01/95 9:00am)

When Stanley Chodorow met Judith Rodin last April, he was pleased to discover that they had a similar set of goals for the future of the University. "We had a lot in common, but were not exactly alike," he said. "In a way, we complemented each other in our differences." And one year later, both Provost Chodorow and University President Rodin feel that they have been a productive team. "I think in terms of the goals that we set for our administrative team in the first year, we have moved forward on many of them," Rodin said. Their first goal was to implement the recommendations of the Commission on Strengthening the Community, a project launched by the previous administration aiming to improve many aspects of University life. The Commission's report, which was released last April, includes recommendations on housing, Greek life and relations between faculty, students and staff. Rodin said that most of the Commission's 60 recommendations had been put in place by January. "We felt very strongly that the work that was begun last year was important and that it galvanized the interest and intention of faculty and students and staff in a very significant way," she said. Rodin added that the administration directed so much energy into this project because they felt they could make a "bigger and stronger Penn" by implementing as many of the Commission's suggestions as possible. The first project that the Rodin-Chodorow administration initiated on its own was the Provost's Council on Undergraduate Education's creation of a model for the 21st Century Undergraduate Experience. PCUE -- chaired by Chodorow and comprised of nine subcommittees of students, faculty and staff -- released phase one of its proposal in May. Phase two will organize and monitor the progress of the present committees. "The 21st Century project for the undergraduate experience is at full steam," University spokesperson Barbara Beck said. "Indeed, some projects will begin on a pilot basis next year." Chodorow said one of PCUE's objectives is to create an environment that prepares students for success, while at the same time making the University a more comfortable and fun place for students. "We want students to look back two years down, five years down, 12 years down, 30 years down and say, 'I am what I am because Penn really made a contribution to my being, and God, was that fun,' " he said. Following the shocking off-campus murder of Al-Moez Alimohamed in August, the University went to work to increase the level of safety on and off campus. Rodin said the University has also been concerned with improving its relations with the immediate community. In February, Rodin unveiled a master safety plan for the University, designed to increase security both on and off campus. The plan included the construction of five security kiosks placed at strategic points running through the center of campus and heavily travelled off-campus streets, creating a series of Community Walks. The new administration has also tried to keep student charges as low as possible for the upcoming year. And they were successful -- the University experienced the lowest percentage increase tuition and room and board in 20 years, as well as the lowest increase in the Ivy League. "We wanted to signal to students and to the families that we do understand that the costs of higher education have been escalating enormously, and that we intend to do our part at Penn to manage our resources well and to think seriously when we raise rates about what it means to the families," Rodin said. Rodin was also responsible for establishing a new leadership team this year, which included Coopers & Lybrand partner John Fry as executive vice president -- the University's top financial officer. And former Food and Drug Administrations Deputy Commissioner for External Affairs Carol Scheman was hired as vice president for government, community and public affairs -- a position created to link the University with federal, state and local governments. "I am extremely pleased with the outcome and with the commitment of the new team to Penn and where it is going," Rodin said. Along with a new team came a new approach to many old issues -- not the least of which was the idea of a student center. In January, Rodin and Chodorow scrapped year-old blueprints for the Revlon Center, which had been in the works since 1988. They replaced this with the Perelman Quadrangle, for which construction is slated to begin in December. The project will renovate and restore Irvine Auditorium and Logan, Williams and Houston halls in order to create student offices, meeting rooms, eating and lounge areas, rehearsal and gallery space and an auditorium with variable seating arrangements. The announcement of this new center originally came as a shock to many student groups that had been promised space under the Revlon Center plan. But the project has gained substantial support from members of the University community. In April, University Trustee and alumnus Ronald Perelman pledged a record $20 million to the new center, doubling his original pledge to the Revlon concept. And last month, University Trustee and alumnus Stephen Wynn committed $7.5 million to the project. Added to the $2.5 million from class gifts given during Alumni Week, the University has already raised nearly half of the $69 million cost. "In just 10 months, President Rodin has attracted several of the largest charitable gifts ever made to the University," Beck said. "And she managed to be enough of a presence on campus so that deans, faculty, students and employees are incredibly enthusiastic about her leadership." In November, Rodin was named to an independent committee to analyze security and safety at the White House. She also worked with two Keystone subcommittees, as a member of an advisory board composed of civic leaders from across the state. Rodin, who estimated in April that she spends 15 percent of an average semester away from campus, said last week that she expects to spend about the same amount of time on the road next year. But she added that she is trying to get more control over her on-campus time. "As a personal goal for next year, I really do want to continue to meet more faculty and students and staff and spend a little less time in formal meetings," Rodin said. "I get tremendous energy and ideas from being out there and really spending time with people who are part of Penn, and I want to fashion my schedule for next year in a way that continues to allow me to do that." Chodorow set a similar personal goal for next year. "At mid-year, I started this program of meeting with students on a regular basis, and it worked well both for me to understand the students and for the students to understand me," he said. "And a lot of students tell me, 'You know, you are not such a bad guy.' "But I had a much harder time -- and I am going to take much more time this year -- getting to know the faculty," Chodorow added. Chodorow's relationship with students got off to a rocky start early in his term, when he was quoted in The Daily Pennsylvanian as saying, "The problem with student participation is that many of them don't have much time. It's not as if students are the best organized people in the world." This angered many student leaders. He admitted last week that one of the things he had to adjust to this year was the different traditions of student participation in the decision-making processes at the University and the University of California at San Diego, where he had been chancellor. "I didn't really know what to expect coming to a new institution," he said. "I didn't have a lot of preconceived notions, although naturally you expect things to be like what you know, and Penn is very different from UCSD." College senior and Undergraduate Assembly Chairperson Lance Rogers said that although he has not had the opportunity to work closely with the provost, he respects Chodorow for keeping an open mind. "If Provost Chodorow is set on doing something and someone comes forward, no matter who that someone is, and presents a logical argument, he will listen to that person, and in some cases even change his mind," Rogers said. Chodorow said his thoughts on undergraduate education evolved as he learned more about the University's traditions. "In the time that we worked on PCUE, I did learn the traditions and my expectations and my notion of how Penn does its undergraduate education?changed quite a lot," he said. "It became about Penn, not about what I knew from this other institution. And that happened in lots and lots of areas where Penn is organized so differently." In particular, Chodorow discovered that the University's leadership is different from what he was used to. "Judy Rodin is a leader of a sort you come across very rarely," Chodorow said. "She has ferocious intelligence and determination to get things done that you rarely see." Chodorow said he was also impressed by how much the administration was able to get done in a one year period. "Me and Judy changed the way we do our capital planning," he said. "I can't tell you how long that would take and how much consultations with state agencies that would require at UCSD. "But we were able to create a new process this year, and next year we will use that process which will make our capital projects more rational," Chodorow added. "When you think about the fact that I had to spend the first six months figuring out what the place was like before I was in a position to do something, we accomplished an enormous amount." He said that ever since the first time he came to visit the University, he has recognized the University as an institution ready for a sudden and drastic improvement. "At that point we were just coming from a billion dollar campaign, we had spectacular new resources and new energy," he said. "The 'little engine that could' became a pretty good sized engine that could. "There was spirit, and you want to pick up on that," Chodorow added. "You don't want to pick an institution out of the gutter, you want to join it as it's starting to trot. And this institution was already at a good trot." He added that the other thing he noticed was that faculty and students "absolutely loved this place." "I thought this was a lovable institution, and I wanted to be at a lovable institution," Chodorow said. And he is intent on making the University even more lovable. "So faculty and staff and students don't have to say, 'I love this place but?,' " he said. "They can just say 'I love this place.' " Rodin had a different feeling when she visited the campus last year because she was coming home, both to the University and to Philadelphia. She feels that her status as an alumna is an advantage for the University. "I believe and hope that it is true that it has helped me to relate to the students very well, particularly the undergraduates, because I was an undergraduate here and really do remember what it felt like," she said. And Rogers said the University was "lucky to get someone who was familiar with Penn and its traditions." Rodin said she has also been impressed by the warm feeling that people have for the University. "One of the most striking things to me is how many undergraduates stop me on campus and tell me how happy they are," she said. "And that never happened to me at Yale, and maybe I was just the provost so they didn't feel that they needed to tell the provost, but it is wonderful. It really is." Beck said Rodin is "well underway to building an efficient, well-run institution that is prospering during a time when many other universities are failing." "Time and time again this year, President Rodin demonstrated that good leadership includes teaching and learning, building relationships and influencing people, as opposed to exercising one's power," she said. Philadelphia Mayor and University alumnus Ed Rendell said that Rodin has "injected new energy into Penn." "She's a great symbolic leader," he said. "But it is too early to tell whether she will make substantial changes."


JIO leaves post after two years

(09/01/95 9:00am)

Student Dispute Resolution Center Director and Judicial Inquiry Officer Steven Blum stepped down from his position in July. To fill the position, Law Professor Michele Goldfarb was named acting Judicial Inquiry Officer, effective August 1. The search for a permanent JIO will begin this fall. While Blum would not specify why he was giving up his post, Provost Stanley Chodorow speculated that "he is tired of the job, which is a tough one." Chodorow also said that Blum wanted to pursue other career options. Over the course of the last semester, Chodorow and Blum disagreed over the department's role at the University. While Blum favored a mostly mediation approach, Chodorow preferred speedy adjudication when it was necessary. "I don't think he felt that this was what he wanted to do," Chodorow said. "I don't know that he was ever comfortable with the role he played [disciplining students] and I was insisting on that role, rather than a mediation role. "I think we do need mediation -- most of our student disputes should be mediated -- because it is a much more educational process and much more helpful process than disciplinary proceedings," he added. "But the JIO is really a disciplinary officer." Chodorow said Goldfarb was highly recommended by people within the University who knew her from her work at the Law School Clinic. "Both faculty and students who knew her gave her rave reviews for her judgement, good sense and organizational skills," he said. When Blum came to the University two years ago, the University was still recovering from the "water buffalo" case. His biggest goal was to restore confidence in the University's judicial system. And he said he thinks he has accomplished this during his short tenure. "We took a system that was deeply involved in controversy and we were able to bring it back to being a system of University discipline and get it out of the controversy," Blum said. Last September, the JIO changed its name to the SDRC in an attempt to better reflect its job on campus. At the time, Blum said students should work with each other to solve their disputes and come to a resolution. Blum said he is proud of his department's introduction of mediation into the handling of discipline matters. "We have worked hard to always treat students with respect, and I think we have succeeded with that," Blum said. One of the biggest projects of Blum's term was the creation of a new Student Judicial Charter "with greater and direct student and faculty involvement." The draft charter, which has still not been adopted, will be reviewed this fall by the administration, the student/faculty committee, and the University Council. It then must be accepted by the deans of the schools. Blum will remain on the faculty of the Legal Studies Department.


Stevens revamps SAS

(09/01/95 9:00am)

Restructuring targetsRestructuring targetspersonnel; new deputyRestructuring targetspersonnel; new deputydean position created School of Arts and Sciences Dean Rosemary Stevens is trying to streamline the senior leadership of the school by restructuring her office. Stevens said the goal of this administrative reorganization is "to strengthen the leadership of the school in order to be as responsive to faculty as possible, and to develop the School of Arts and Sciences into the best school it can be with both short and long term goals." Effective today, Stevens appointed SAS Associate Dean Frank Warner to a new position, deputy dean. Warner, who is also a mathematics professor, will be Stevens' principal representative, and will therefore be authorized to act on behalf of the dean. His responsibilities include planning, budget, personnel and facilities. "My goal is to support Dean Stevens and the rest of her administrative team to the best of my ability, to move the School of Arts and Sciences forward," he said. As a result of the creation of this post, the position of vice dean for finance and administration -- which is currently held by Mary Cahill -- will be eliminated. Cahill leaves her position today. Members of the University see Warner's appointment as a welcome addition to the SAS community. "Frank Warner is an amazingly responsive person," said Undergraduate English Chairperson Al Filreis. "In my experience he's been very fair to the humanities -- what he doesn't know about what we do, he's willing to learn." David Balamuth, chairperson of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, will become associate dean for the sciences, replacing Warner. And Music Professor Eugene Narmour will serve as associate dean for the humanities after History Professor Richard Beeman stepped down this summer.


OFSA director leaves U.

(09/01/95 9:00am)

Tricia Phaup, director of the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs, left the University June 30. Scott Reikofski, assistant director of student life activities and facilities, was appointed acting director for one year. Phaup said she left her position in order to pursue another job -- working in a private hospital with geriatric patients. "I am totally switching fields so it will bring about a lot of new opportunities for me and push me in directions I have not been pushed in before," she said. She added that leaving the University will be difficult for her. "I have been here for seven years now, and I have made a lot of great friends," she said. Phaup served as the principal advisor to the BiCultural InterGreek Council, the InterFraternity Council and the Panhellenic Council. She also worked actively with members of the Greek Alumni Council, as well as with many national fraternity and sorority chapters. "Her responsibilities range from helping to sponsor different on-campus events to working through any of the issues and concerns that come up as part of the work with the different student groups," Vice Provost for University Life Valarie Swain-Cade McCoullum said. Associate Vice Provost for University Life Larry Moneta said Reikofski is committed to the same issues. Before coming to the University two years ago, Reikofski had "a strong background in student group advising and the fraternity and sorority world," Moneta said. "I hope that he will be able to sustain all of the really good things that Tricia started while we take the time to contemplate the future," he added. Reikofski said he wants to focus on the degree of segmentation among the three Greek umbrella organizations. "I want to see them continue to grow together and come together as a system, but still maintain them by recognizing their structural differences and the different needs that they have," he said. And Reikofski said he feels "really good" about being appointed to this position. "I guess I look at it as a vote of confidence at what I was able to do here," he said. He added that he would be interested in taking on the job on a permanent basis. "I see this as a chance to step up to a director's level at the University and sort of audition for the part," he said. But Moneta said his department has not even begun to think about who the permanent director will be. "We are going to await the continued efforts for the University's long range direction for undergraduate education before doing anything," he said. "We want to make sure that [who] we bring in is really consistent with all of their undergraduate initiatives." During Phaup's tenure, the Greek system experienced many changes. In 1993, a strict Bring Your Own Beer alcohol policy was instituted, and has been modified several times since then. And in 1994, the Delta Delta Delta sorority became the first sorority in the University's history to be located on Locust Walk. The Greek system also saw the addition of the Pi Beta Phi and Lambda Upsilon Lambda sororities, and the loss of the Kappa Delta sorority. In addition, the Pi Kappa Alpha, Theta Xi, Psi Upsilon and Phi Kappa Sigma fraternities have left campus.


TRANSITIONS: Deputy provost starts

(09/01/95 9:00am)

Law and Economics Professor Michael Wachter took office as deputy provost July 1, replacing Physics Professor Walter Wales, who served in the position for almost three years. Wachter has been the director of the Center for Law and Economics since 1984, and holds a faculty post in the Law School. He was selected for the deputy provost position in March. In the past, the deputy provost has been responsible for all faculty matters -- including appointments, grievances, benefits, promotions and overseeing tenure cases. Wachter will also act for the provost in his absence. But Provost Stanley Chodorow said in March that Wachter's position is going to have less of a focus on personnel issues and will instead target academic planning. -- Amy Lipman Chaplain retires Chaplain Stanley Johnson retired June 30 after 34 years of service at the University. His position remained vacant during the summer, and Provost Stanley Chodorow said the search for his replacement will not begin until early this semester. A committee charged with evaluating the role of the chaplain at a modern university submitted a proposal in April recommending that the position be sustained in the future, with a few alterations. University President Judith Rodin said this same committee, which was chaired by Social Work Professor Jane Lowe, will recommend a replacement for Johnson, who was hired in 1961. During his tenure at the University, Johnson served primarily as a counselor, spearheading programs for students with questions about their sexuality and dealing with women's issues. -- Amy Lipman Press director selected Eric Halpern, editor-in-chief of the Johns Hopkins University Press, was appointed director of the University of Pennsylvania Press by Provost Stanley Chodorow last week. As director of the Penn Press, Halpern will be responsible for developing its editorial program and managing all of its operations, according to a University statement. The Penn Press publishes scholarly books and selected textbooks, reference books and serious nonfiction of general interest. "Eric Halpern has the experience and demonstrated success in building a publisher's list of distinguished works to make him a superb director of Penn's Press," Chodorow said. "He's quite an impressive person -- energetic, smart and learned." Halpern will begin his new position October 1. -- Daniel Gingiss Human Resources vice president chosen Clint Davidson has been named to the position of vice president for human resources, Executive Vice President John Fry announced at the beginning of August. The University's Board of Trustees will vote on Davidson's nomination September 22. If confirmed, Davidson -- who is currently the associate vice chancellor for human resources at Vanderbilt University -- will take over the post October 1, but will not be on campus until November 1. He will spend the month making his transition from Vanderbilt to the University, Fry said. In his new position, Davidson will be responsible for "the development, implementation and coordination of policies and programs encompassing all aspects of human resource management," according to a University statement. John Gould will remain acting vice president for human resources until September 30. The post had been vacated last summer when William Holland left the University after two years in the office. Gould has been holding the interim position since October. -- Amy Lipman


Four students die in unrelated incidents

(09/01/95 9:00am)

A Dental student was accidentally shot.A Dental student was accidentally shot.Three others died in one week. Four University students died in unrelated incidents this summer. Second-year Dental student Alexander Orig died August 8 after he was accidentally shot by a customs security officer at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport in the Philippines, according to Dental School Student Affairs Director Barb Helpin. College sophomore Emily Sachs died May 24 as a result of a heart attack triggered by an asthma attack. Joseph Walters, a 40-year-old part-time student in the Computer Information Science masters program in the School of Engineering, died May 29, also of a heart attack. And Bioengineering doctoral candidate John Marshall died on May 26 of natural causes. Orig, 22, was returning home from a vacation in the city of Manila in the Philippines with his family. Before he could depart on a flight back to the United States, however, he had to go through the airport's customs area, Helpin said. There, a security officer who was reloading his gun accidentally fired and fatally wounded Orig, she said. Orig is survived by his parents and one brother. Sachs was visiting friends on campus May 23 when she experienced an asthma attack, according to Assistant Vice Provost for University Life Barbara Cassel. Sachs had asked her friends to take her to the emergency room, where she was admitted and put on a respirator. During the course of the night, she suffered a cardiac arrest and could not be resuscitated. Her mother, Jo-Ann Sachs, said she cannot figure out why this happened. "I sent her off?perfectly healthy," she said in late May. "And then she died the next day. There was nothing wrong with her except asthma." Sachs was diagnosed with asthma at the age of two. But her friend College sophomore Marla Snyder, who described Sachs as "by far the most genuine human being I think I have ever met," said she never let her condition get in her way. "She accomplished more in 19 years than any of us could expect to accomplish in a lifetime," Snyder said. She said Sachs was always referred to as "little Em" because she was only five feet tall. "But she was definitely not small in spirit," she added. Snyder said she had never been as close with anyone as she was with Sachs. They often referred to each other as sisters, she said. The two were planning to live together next year. "We couldn't wait to decorate and hold dinner parties," Snyder said. Sachs, who was a member of the Chi Omega sorority, was an accomplished dancer and singer. She won both the Miss Dance Pennsylvania title and the Miss Teen Dance New York City title. "She was determined to be on Broadway," Snyder said. "And she would have been." Sachs's family set up a memorial fund at her temple. Contributions in her memory can be sent to the Har Zion Temple at the following address: 491 Bellvue Avenue, Trenton N. J., 08618. Walters was found dead in his hotel room in Cambridge, Mass., where he was attending a class for his job. He was a senior systems programmer. Marshall had taken a medical leave from the University last fall. Cassel said she did not know what his illness was. A memorial service for Orig will be held at 3 p.m. September 9 at the Newman Center Chapel.


Time has run out for Smith Hall

(08/10/95 9:00am)

Smith Hall is history. At least it will be by Tuesday. The building is being demolished in a slow, drawn out process. Brick by brick, workers have been taking apart Smith Hall for the past week, according to a worker at the site. The University was issued a permit by the city late June that allows for both the demolition of the building and the construction of phase one of the Institute for Advanced Science and Technology on the same location, according to Barry Cooperman, vice provost for research. Phase one entails the construction of a $34 million, 86,000-square-foot high-tech building on the Smith Hall site. This site was officially approved by the Air Force last month when it signed a Record of Decision and released the necessary funds. This approval came after more than four years of planning, discussions and controversy. Since the initial plans for the IAST were released, many students and alumni have expressed concern over the idea the historic building will be destroyed in order to make room for the IAST. Throughout July, the University prepared Smith Hall for demolition. This involved removing all of the asbestos in the building and hiring a contractor to undertake the project. The earliest the building could have been demolished was July 19 because the demolition notice has to be posted at least 21 days prior to the act, Cooperman said. Gravina said the University met with seven contracting companies in order to look into the various ways to approach tearing down the building. This project began in 1991, when the federal government selected the University as the site for the IAST. The project was then turned over to the Department of Defense and subsequently to the Air Force. The project is slated to create space for the Chemistry Department, additional Chemical Engineering laboratories and research space for the Bioengineering Department. Three years ago, the Air Force began an Environmental Impact Study, analyzing the plan's historical and environmental significance, focusing specifically on Smith Hall. In March, the Air Force finally completed the EIS and deemed the site appropriate. And last month's release of the Record of Decision made it official. As of March, the Air Force had already allocated $23.75 million in grant money for the entire project, according to Associate Director for Federal Relations Carl Maugeri. Its total contribution could reach $35 million. Cooperman has estimated that the construction phase of the project will cost between $44 and $50 million, and that the entire project could cost up to $70 million. Phase two of the project will consist of remodeling the Morgan Building and the Music Building and constructing a new wing that will connect the two buildings from the rear. For the third phase, the University will construct an engineering-science library in Hayden Hall. This will be expensive, and may take a long time to construct. The fourth and final phase of the project is the retro-renovating of space in both the engineering and chemical complexes. Because this phase is routine renovation work, its budget can be cut if the costs of the project become too high. Gravina has estimated that the entire project will take two years to complete.


Soap opera star, figure skating champ entering with Class of '99

(08/10/95 9:00am)

and Betty Yuan September 2 will bring the last entering freshmen class of the millennium to the University. And the Class of 1996 certainly has its share of star, according to Admissions Dean Lee Stetson, ranging from budding television actors to rising professional athletes. One member of the entering class, Jessica Prunell, who has appeared on As the World Turns for the past three years, turned down a six-year contract for a television series to pursue a college career. From actor to authors, one entering freshman, who immigrated from Russia in 1988, has already co-authored a textbook. And another student is an egyptologist who had her work published. Joining their illustrious fellow classmates will be several young athletes as well, including a nationally ranked figure skater, a top male squash player from Pakistan and a champion snowboarder from Munich, Germany. And the talent seems to stem abundantly from global sources -- a number of foreign countries have contributed to this year's prestigious group of first-year students. From Mongolia, comes the first undergraduate of her nation to enter the University of Pennsylvania in recent history who aspires to be a pre-medical student and will someday take her medical practice back to her home country. In addition, the controversial nations -- Bosnia and Croatia will also be sending the University it's finest students this coming fall. And the University is prepared to welcome their entering freshmen in style. This includes freshmen-geared programs such as "PennQuest" and New Student Orientation. Described as "an outdoor experience" by its glossy brochures, "PennQuest" is a four-day excursion and will start on August 28. Participants will spend one day at the Pocono Environment Education Center and the following day backpacking on the Appalachian trail. Students who wish to join in the "Quest" will pay $150 for the chance to get a head start socially, by meeting their new peers before the move-in frenzy that is marked by NSO. After move-in, students will be able to take part in several time-honored University traditions. This year, the Penn Reading Project assignment is the play, Arcadia, by Tom Stoppard. Small workshops will be carried out where faculty and students and discuss their reactions to the reading. And the NSO convocation -- with speeches given by the President and Provost to name a few -- will be among the first events that help create the Class of 1999's first impression of the University. There will also be a "Philly and You" bus tour among the events that will be offered. NSO will end with a trip to Six Flags Great Adventure taking place the Sunday after classes start.


Police commissioner search down to one preferred candidate

(08/10/95 9:00am)

After months of carefully reviewing candidates to replace John Kuprevich as University Police Commissioner, Executive Vice President John Fry said earlier this week that he has made his recommendation to University President Judith Rodin and Provost Stanley Chodorow. While Fry would not reveal what his recommendation was, a source close to public safety has disclosed that the top two candidates for the position were Rutgers University-Camden Chief of Police Gene Dooley and Philadelphia Police Deputy Commissioner Thomas Seamon. Fry declined comment on the issue. Dooley could neither confirm nor deny his candidacy but referred all calls to the Executive Vice President's Office. And Seamon did not return phone calls all week. Last month Fry reported that he had brought the search down to two candidates and that his next step was to bring the group to "select groups of students and faculty on campus to see what they think." These groups had the opportunity to meet with and interview Dooley and Seamon over the past few weeks. Since that time, several new candidates entered the picture, Fry said, adding that although he felt it would be irresponsible not to consider these new applicants, he would not let their emergence slow down the progress of his search. Fry said he made his consultative group to Rodin and Chodorow last Thursday, after collecting input from his committee. They will be meeting with the candidate today, and will give him their feedback by Monday, he added. And he hopes to be able to make a final announcement next week. But he said he will take their opinions very seriously, adding that if they are not satisfied with his choice he will come up with another candidate for them. As Deputy Commissioner, Seamon is second in command of the Philadelphia Police Department. He fills in as department head in the Commissioner's absence. And Seamon served as interim police commissioner in 1992 when Willy Williams, the Philadelphia police commissioner at the time, went to Los Angeles in May 1992 to become the commissioner there. Seamon ran for the commissioner position in 1992, but lost to current Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Neal. Some of Seamon's major duties include implementing strategies and devising policies for the department, in addition to working on the budget. Rutgers Police Captain Douglas Thompson said Dooley has accomplished a lot since his arrival to their Public Safety Department in 1992. He said Dooley has been instrumental in instituting a comprehensive crime prevention program at Rutgers, which includes programs pertaining to personal security, student orientation and crime prevention, as well as a Rape Aggression Defense program. "He has also been effective in having a harmonious liaison between local police agencies throughout South Jersey," Thompson added. He said the Rutgers security program is smaller, adding that Dooley has less responsibility and involvement than he would at the University. "I assume the job [at Penn] is much more involved and would pose more challenge than a particular job here," Thompson said. When Kuprevich announced his resignation in April, he expected to be done with his responsibilities by the end of July. But since the search for a new commissioner has been taking longer than originally projected, Kuprevich is going to remain at the University for another six weeks, until the replacement is selected, Fry said last month. The comprehensive national search for Kuprevich's replacement began promptly after he announced his resignation. Since then, Fry has narrowed the field of candidates from more than 70 applicants to the few that currently remain.


Blue kiosk draws attention

(08/10/95 9:00am)

When safety and the University clash, the University has a secret weapon -- a paintbrush. The security kiosk located at 36th and Sansom streets, which was recently transformed into a blue structure with a tin roof, is an example of this. Originally, the five kiosks set up around campus were all wooden and shingled. But soon a Design Review Committee and Vice President for Facilities Management Arthur Gravina assessed the kiosks. They decided that there was a need to alter the appearance of the one at 36th and Sansom, according to Security Service Director Christopher Algard. "It did not meet the aesthetics of the surrounding buildings," he said. "The building style of the surrounding area is different than the Locust Walk area." And the closest neighbor of the kiosk, the Institute of Contemporary Art, agreed that the original design did not belong in the environment. "It would have been more suitable to a garden setting than a West Philadelphia street-scape," ICA Director Patrick Murphy said. But he said he was not involved in the decision to change the kiosk, adding that the whole situation has been a mystery to him. Diane Wynne, a recent graduate of the Graduate School of Education, was not as supportive of the changes, calling the blue kiosk "just plain ugly." "I do not know what possessed them to paint it blue and put that shiny roof on," she said on the upenn.safety newsgroup last month. College senior Matthew Ro disagrees. "This is a perfect example or art in everyday life, sort of the Mona Lisa of kiosks." University Police Commissioner John Kuprevich said there are no plans to change any of the other kiosks. Summer Pennsylvanian Staff Writer Josh Fineman contributed to this article.


Summer security tightened

(08/03/95 9:00am)

and Betty Yuan Due to low student occupancy on campus and the surrounding vicinity, the University has taken action to strengthen their security initiatives during the summer months. According to Victim Support Director Maureen Rush, several safety measures were implemented last week. "What we have done to insure safety for August is work with the city of Philadelphia in conjunction with the Penn Police department to put together a strike force," she said. The "strike force" consists of plain clothes and uniformed police officers from both the University Police and Philadelphia Police departments, Rush said. "We are saturating areas of campus that we feel are more on the outskirts such as the 4000 block of Baltimore Avenue -- areas where there have been previous reports of crime and/or areas which are off the beaten path," she added. Security is now more visible in these areas, in an effort to deter crime and make students feel more comfortable about the safety of the area. "The best you can expect is no crime being reported, and secondly, people have a greater perception of security for their well-being," Rush said. Rush added that in addition to providing security and comfort, a goal of the program is to encourage students to utilize such services as the Community Walks program, walking escort and mobile escort vans. There are nine transit stops available, which provide students with a safe place to wait for the escort van to pick them up. They include the stop in front of High Rise South, which has been moved over slightly as a result of construction. "People believed that the transit stop at High Rise South was not open and we want to correct that," she said. "In fact, the High Rise South transit stop is open and is being staffed by public safety representatives." Rush added that, as a result, Escort vans cannot drive up to the front of the high rise as they have in the past. Instead, drivers are being instructed to pull up to the intersection of 39th and Irving streets, and beep their horns as a signal to students waiting either inside the lobby of High Rise South. "All people need to do is keep an eye out but stay in the building," Rush said. "We have a security monitor inside the building with them." These transit stop monitors are stationed at each of the transit stop locations in order to insure students a safe waiting environment.


VP for Human Resources named

(08/03/95 9:00am)

John Gould to remain until Sept. 30 Clint Davidson has been named to the position of vice president for Human Resources, Executive Vice President John Fry announced earlier this week. The University's Board of Trustees will vote on Davidson's nomination on September 22. If confirmed, Davidson -- who is currently the associate vice chancellor for Human Resources at Vanderbilt University -- will take over the post October 1. But he will not be on campus full-time until November 1. He will spend the month making his transition from Vanderbilt to the University, Fry said. In his new position, Davidson will be responsible for "the development, implementation and coordination of policies and programs encompassing all aspects of human resource management," according to a University statement. He will essentially be responsible for overseeing the University's employees, which is no small task considering that the University is the largest private employer in Philadelphia, and the fourth-largest in the state. Davidson said he intends to focus his initial attention "on listening and seeing what the primary needs are." John Gould will remain acting vice president for Human Resources until September 30. The post had been vacated last summer when William Holland left the University after two years in the office. Gould has been holding the interim position since October. Gould was unavailable for comment. Davidson comes to the University with more than 25 years of experience in the field. "He really is very deeply experienced in human resources and higher education," Fry said. "He is one of the leading thinkers and practitioners in the field." Fry said he has been involved in the search for a vice president for human resources since his arrival at the University in April. At that time he was presented with the names of four candidates for the position. He said Davidson did not initially apply for the position until the University pursued him as a candidate. Fry added that Davidson made a really positive impression during his interview. "I decided based on meeting with all four candidates that Clint was the one I wanted to bring on," he said. "He really seemed to be a person who really could be very fair relative to employee concerns. "He seemed to have a real heart," Fry added. Davidson said while both Vanderbilt and the University have their own personalities, there are a lot of similarities. "Our universities are only as good as the people a part of the University," he said. He said his goal is to insure that the work environment at the University is conducive to productivity. And Davidson said he is convinced that the University has the kind of leadership to "really make things happen." Davidson has also served as the director of personnel services at the University of Oklahoma, the assistant senior vice president for Administrative Services at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and the director of the University of Rochester's Personnel and Affirmative Action department.


Newsweek: Rodin is up and coming

(08/03/95 9:00am)

University President Judith Rodin is one in a million. Or at least one in a hundred, according to Newsweek. Along with Vice President Al Gore, Detroit Piston Grant Hill and fashion designer Donna Karan, Rodin is listed as one of the nation's "Overclass 100." The Overclass 100 is "an unscientific list of 100 members of the new overclass," according to the article in the July 31 issue. "They are among the country's comers, the newest wave of important and compelling people," it says. But this is just the most recent example of Rodin national recognition. Since her inauguration she has been sought after by many organizations and companies. Earlier this summer, she was elected to the Board of Directors of Aetna Life & Casualty insurance company. Aetna Chairperson Ronald Compton said the corporation selected Rodin because of her "distinguished academic career, expertise in health care delivery and broad understanding of the issues facing society." Rodin is also currently a member of the Board of Directors of the Greater Philadelphia First Corporation, which is comprised of 32 leaders of the largest corporations in the region. The committee's purpose is to work with other organizations in the region to improve the educational opportunities available to the next generation of scholars. And she is one of only two university presidents named to the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. Rodin said she always has the University in mind when she is serving in her other capacities. "I see the opportunity to turn whatever interests people have in me as a way of getting Penn's message out," she said. "So I am always in committees and in any national exposure trying to talk about what we are doing here and why what we are doing is groundbreaking." She added that she only chooses to serve on committees that will enable her to make a difference on issues that are important to the University community. Rodin said she limits the number of offers she accepts, because they are time-consuming. She accepted a position on Aetna's board because its issues directly relate to the University Medical Center's own health care system. "I chose that one and turned down several others that I felt were not as relevant to issues that I was confronting at Penn," Rodin said. Rodin's dedication to the Philadelphia community motivated her to join the board of the Greater Philadelphia First. "I certainly think that she has taken on an active role in terms of seeing the University as very much a part of this community," said Mary Gregg, deputy director of the organization. "And in that sense she is very reflective of the type of member we like to have as a member of Philadelphia First." And Vice President for Government, Community and Public Affairs Carol Scheman said Rodin's service on the President's Committee is "enormously important to the University because we are a research University and so much of our future is tied to research." Scheman added that since the federal government is now rethinking the funding it will allocate for research, Rodin's presence on the committee will insure that the University's direct needs are represented. And University spokesperson Barbara Beck said Rodin's leadership skills make her a successful president. "She has vision, confidence, optimism and the ability to get things done fast," she said. "Those are the qualities needed to command a world class institution like the University of Pennsylvania."


Community Walks program going well

(07/27/95 9:00am)

University Police Commissioner John Kuprevich praises the Community Walks program, reporting that there has been a marked decrease in the number of on-campus incidents reported since its implementation in May. "What we are finding right now is that we are showing a better than 30 percent reduction in the number of incidents during the time period that we have the Community Walks staff, compared to the same time period last year," Kuprevich said. And Maureen Rush, director of victim support and special services, said the new kiosk system and the improved walking escort program have increased the visible signs of security on the walks. But there are some members of the University community who are apprehensive about the new safety initiatives. The Community Walks program is part of the University's new master security plan, which was unveiled by University President Judith Rodin in February. According to this plan, Community Walks will run through the center of campus and along other heavily travelled off-campus routes. Five kiosks and 15 new blue-light phones are placed at strategic points along these walks. The kiosks will serve as the primary base of operation for security officers patrolling along the walks. In addition, the Allied Security guards will be responsible for walking around their designated areas. Emergency telephones are installed outside the kiosks to ensure safety at times when the officers are not stationed inside them. Since May, three of the five kiosks have been staffed between the hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. -- the ones at 40th and Locust, 37th and Locust and 33rd and Smith streets. And all five kiosks are staffed from 5 p.m. to 3 a.m. And Kuprevich said the Allied guards have been "very good in providing information to the police department in terms of reporting suspicious activity." "So we think that that piece of it is a very good indication of the success of the program so far," he said. Kuprevich said his department, along with the Department of Facilities Planning, have identified the designated locations of the new blue-light phones. "The phones are here, but we just want to make sure that we put them up in the most cost-effective, but effective, way," he added. He said the goal is to increase the level of evening and nighttime visibility, adding that some of the fixtures currently being used may be changed in order to increase visibility on the walkways. While officials maintain that these walks are for everyone in the surrounding community -- not just University students -- College junior Sylvie Volel feels that the program is actually isolating the campus from the community, instead of enhancing the relationship. "They are making the campus into a fortress," she said. Rush said the advantage of the Community Walks program is that "we are going to have an optimal number of people congregating on Locust Walk." "The key concept is to get as many people walking on campus as possible," she said. "And that is why we beefed up the Walking Escort program." She added that Walking Escort runs from 6 p.m. to 3 a.m. seven days a week. The increased visibility is an advantage because "people feel safer when they see an officer walking by them," Rush said. Kuprevich said he "absolutely expects" the Community Walks program to be running smoothly by the fall.


U. keeps police commissioner six more weeks

(07/27/95 9:00am)

Since the search for a new police commissioner is taking longer than expected, Kuprevich is going to remain at the University for another six weeks, until the replacement is selected, according to Executive Vice President John Fry. "I made the decision because we are getting close to selecting our next commissioner, and John has graciously agreed to extend his stay for a little while longer," Fry said. He added that he is still on track to his original commitment of replacing Kuprevich by the end of the summer. He added that he hopes to narrow down the search to one or two candidates to present to University President Judith Rodin and Provost Stanley Chodorow as soon as possible. "I am hoping to make a final announcement August 15," he said. "Maybe even a week sooner." And since Kuprevich is involved in several important long-term projects -- such as the Community Walks program -- the University could benefit from him finishing them up before he leaves, Fry added. The comprehensive national search for Kuprevich's replacement began promptly after he announced his resignation. Since then, Fry has narrowed the field of candidates from more than 70 applicants to a small group of final candidates. Last week, Fry reported that he had brought the search down to two to four candidates. Yesterday, Fry said he has recently been receiving phone calls bringing more people into the search. "This thing is more fluid than I would have expected," he said. Fry said he has appointed a consultative group to involve faculty, students and administrative staff in the candidate review process. "I am trying to reach out and now get the opinions of very important constituencies," he said. He added that it is very important to him that the final candidates have a good relationship with the Philadelphia Police and community. "One of the things that is extremely important to me is an understanding and an appreciation for Philadelphia, and particularly the West Philadelphia area," he said. Fry added that he has spent a lot of time consulting with former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Kevin Tucker for the search. Fry said he is on "a very very fast track" in terms of presenting a finalist to Rodin and Chodorow.


Dunkin' Donuts first of new U. stores to open

(07/20/95 9:00am)

It is time to make the doughnuts at The Shops at Penn at 34th and Walnut streets. Dunkin' Donuts moved into the shopping area on Monday, replacing Perfect Pretzel, which closed down last spring for economic reasons. And just down the block, the parking garage at 38th and Walnut streets is preparing to open in the fall, according to Associate Treasurer Chris Mason. He said the University is currently in the middle of negotiations to fill the last two vacancies in the garage by leasing it to Commerce Bank. Mason described the chain, which has several branches in the Philadelphia area, as being small and "not a mega bank." "It's a customer-oriented bank," he said. He added that while the University has not closed a deal with the bank yet, he is confident that it will work out. "We are working on the lease and we don't see much of a problem with it, so we are assuming that everything is going to happen," Mason said earlier this week. He added that he expects the bank to open up by September. The garage is also slated to house several stores, including Campus Copy Center, an extension of Joseph Anthony Hairstyling, Thrift Drug and Mail Boxes Etc. Mason said Thrift Drug has already started construction, and that if everything remains on schedule the stores should all be open by the end of next semester. "We don't see any problems or delays that we can't control," he said. "Sometime during the first semester everything should open up." And a little further down the block, at 39th and Walnut streets, Mega Video is scheduled to re-open in September, Mason said. The video store shut down in February after a fire tore through the Convenient Food Store next door, completely gutting the convenience store and causing smoke and water damage to Mega Video and some of its neighbors. Mason said the future of the convenience store is "up in the air at this point," adding that the space has been gutted and the roof has been replaced over it. "Right now we are just bringing it back to a shell," he said. And the University may be signing a tenant to fill the space a few stores down from Mega Video left vacant when Galaxy Entertainment closed down in April. Mason said it is unlikely that the location will be replaced by another arcade, adding that the University is currently negotiating with "an existing business in West Philadelphia that may relocate there." He said this business is one that does a lot of business with the University.


U. searches for VPUL, commissioner

(07/20/95 9:00am)

The committee searching for a permanent Vice Provost for University Life at the University is getting close to making its recommendation to Provost Stanley Chodorow, according to VPUL Committee Chairperson and Undergraduate Mathematics Chairperson Dennis DeTurck. "I think we will be ready before too long," he said, adding that he is almost certain the committee will make its recommendation before the semester starts. DeTurck added that the committee is only looking at candidates from within the University community. "But not necessarily within the division of University Life," he said. "It can be from other places in the University." Chodorow began the search for a permanent VPUL last spring. Acting VPUL Valarie Swain-Cade McCoullum has occupied the post since Kim Morrison, executive director of the 21st Century Project on the Undergraduate Experience, departed in December 1993. McCoullum is one of the candidates for the permanent position. Chodorow added that while he has not given the committee an "absolute deadline" on the search project, he has urged it to complete its work. And the search for a new University Police Commissioner is also coming along well, according to Executive Vice President John Fry. The initial group of more than 70 applicants has been reduced to "a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 4," he said on Monday. Fry said he is very happy with the resulting group of applicants. "It's a really great pool," he said. He added that his next step is to bring the candidates to select groups of students and faculty on campus to see what they think. "Based on their feedback, I am going to make my recommendation to the president," Fry said. "And at that point we will make an announcement." He added that he wants to move quickly because he is "very anxious to get the person on the board as quickly as possible." "I would love to see groups set up by the early part of August and see a decision made by mid-August," Fry said. "The person should be ready to start sometime in early fall."


Dean Stevens restructuring SAS leadership

(07/20/95 9:00am)

New position of deputy dean created School of Arts and Sciences Dean Rosemary Stevens is trying to streamline the senior leadership of the school by restructuring her office. But while she is very happy with the new administrative structure she has created, there are members of the University community who are apprehensive about the changes. Effective September 1, there will be several personnel changes within the SAS Dean's Office. Stevens has appointed SAS Associate Dean Frank Warner to a new position called Deputy Dean. Warner, who is also a Mathematics Professor, will be Stevens' principal representative, and will therefore be authorized to act on behalf of the dean. His responsibilities include planning, budget, personnel and facilities. "My goal is to support Dean Stevens and the rest of her administrative team, to the best of my ability, to move the School of Arts and Sciences forward," he said. He added that he has already dealt with some of the budget and facility issues in his associate dean position, but that as deputy dean he will have "additional time to devote to these important issues." As a result of the creation of this post, the position of vice dean for finance and administration will be eliminated. This position is currently held by Mary Cahill. As deputy dean, Warner will have more responsibilities than Cahill did, because she did not have oversight over faculty or academic matters, according to Janine Sternlieb, executive assistant to the dean. One University official, who spoke under the condition of anonymity, attributed the creation of this new position to the fact that the SAS is being poorly run by Stevens. "[Stevens] is shifting a lot of the responsibility of running the school to Frank Warner because I think she is having a lot of trouble doing it herself," the source said. But other members of the University see Warner's appointment as a welcome addition to the SAS community. "Frank Warner is an amazingly responsive person," said Al Filreis, Undergraduate English Chair. "In my experience he's been very fair to the Humanities -- what he doesn't know about what we do, he's willing to learn. "I'm glad that the person with the keenest sense of budgetary planning in the school is now a member of the faculty," he added. Cahill said she will continue in this position until September 1, and will help Warner with the transition. She said she would like to continue working at the University, adding that she has been "having some conversations with various people in central administration and also in the health system." Cahill added that she hopes to have the opportunity to apply her business background to a position at the University. She has an MBA from Harvard University. "I have been with the University for two-and-a-half years, but I have spent about 12 years in the business world, so I have a lot of good experience that I hope I can draw on," she said. David Balamuth, Chair of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, will be taking over as Associate Dean. He will be in charge of the Natural Sciences, Economics and History and Sociology of Science departments. Sternlieb said it has not yet been decided who will replace Balamuth as the Physics and Astronomy Chair. And Music Professor Eugene Narmour has already taken over as Associate Dean for the Humanities. He started in this position July 1, one day after History Professor Richard Beeman stepped down. Stevens said the goal of this administrative reorganization is "to strengthen the leadership of the school in order to be as responsive to faculty as possible, and to develop the School of Arts and Sciences into the best school it can be with both short and long term goals." She added that she is very pleased with the restructuring. "We are making our financial services and our facility services as effective as they can possibly be," she said. "I feel very good about what we are doing." And Provost Stanley Chodorow said he supports this re-engineering. "The SAS effort will streamline the operation, clarify the lines of authority and responsibility in the dean's office and save money," he said. Since assuming the SAS deanship in 1991, Stevens has been working on streamlining the school. In several cases, this meant making decisions unpopular within the University community. In September 1993 she announced that she would disband the Religious Studies, American Civilization and Regional Science departments. At the time, she said this was necessary to save the school money and use resources more effectively. This decision was met by much disappointment and debate among SAS students and faculty members. The Religious Studies Department was ultimately spared, but the other two departments were disbanded last summer and transformed into inter-departmental programs.


JIO Steven Blum steps down after two years

(07/20/95 9:00am)

Student Dispute Resolution Center Director Steven Blum stepped down from his position on Monday. But Blum is not leaving the University. He will be continuing to teach in the Legal Studies Department. While Blum would not specify why he was giving up his post, Provost Chodorow speculated that he was leaving because "he is tired of the job, which is a tough one, and because he wants to pursue other career options." Chodorow has named Law Professor Michele Goldfarb as acting Judicial Inquiry Officer. Her appointment will be effective August 1. He said Goldfarb was highly recommended by people in the University who knew her from her work at the Law School Clinic. "Both faculty and students who knew her gave her rave reviews for her judgement, good sense and organizational skills," Chodorow said. He added that the search for a permanent JIO will not begin until the fall. "I will start a search for a permanent replacement in the fall, when the students have returned to campus and we can set up a proper committee," he said. When Blum came to the University two years ago, the University was still recovering from the "water buffalo" case. His biggest goal was to restore confidence in the University's judicial system. And he said he thinks he has accomplished this during his short tenure. "We took a system that was deeply involved in controversy and we were able to bring it back to being a system of University discipline and get it out of the controversy," Blum said. Last September, the JIO changed its name to the SDRC in an attempt to better reflect its job on campus. At the time, Blum said students work with each other to solve their disputes and come to a resolution, and that the center's job is not to decide if students broke criminal statutes. Blum said he is proud of his department's introduction of mediation into the handling of discipline matters. Under Blum, the SDRC emphasized mediation over prosecution. With this system, students who go before the SDRC are provided with a trained mediator to serve as their advisor. Most cases were settled before actually going to the University Hearing Board. He said he was also pleased with the respect with which his office has attempted to treat every student. "We have worked hard to always treat students with respect, and I think we have succeeded with that," Blum said. And Chodorow agreed that the most important things Blum accomplished during his two years were "to put the JIO office on a stable basis and to put emphasis on mediation of those disputes that were suitable for such treatment. "His experience with mediation and with counseling helped to make the JIO office into an educational office," he said. One of the biggest projects of Blum's term was the creation of the Student Judicial Charter. The new system would involve a Student Judicial Council, which would include 17 students and a hearing board with four students. The Committee for Judicial Reform released its final recommendations for a new Judicial Charter in March, calling for "a new system with greater and direct student and faculty involvement." The draft charter has still has to be completed by the General Counsel's office. After it is completed, it will have to be reviewed by the administration, the student/faculty committee, and the University Council. And when that process is completed, the charter must be accepted by the deans of the schools. Chodorow said he expects putting the new charter in place to take most of the fall semester. But Chodorow said Blum's departure will not have an effect on the review and approval of a new judicial charter. And University Judicial Administrator Stephen Gale said this charter will be more important to the future of the SDRC than who is appointed as the next director. "The constitution of the office will certainly be driven by the nature of the charter change and not so much by the person selected," he said. "It's going to be, I assume, very close to business as usual except in so far as there are changes in the charter."


More dorms wired for ResNet

(07/13/95 9:00am)

More students than ever will be hooking up this fall -- to ResNet, that is. ResNet is being installed in Hill House, Mayer Hall, Stouffer College House, Van Pelt College House and W.E.B. Dubois College House this summer. This will allow students to have enhanced telephone service, a computer connection to PennNet and access to a 55-channel cable television network. But in order to provide these services, Data Communications and Computing Services had to create completely new pathways throughout the dormitories, which were not constructed to accommodate such a system. According to DCCS Project Coordinator Matthew Bixler, construction began for all of the dorms except Mayer Hall on May 25th, and the project is expected to take 10 weeks to complete. Contractors are slated to begin work on Mayer Hall the first week in August. Bixler said the installation process varies by building. For Hill House, contractors had to install an enclosed metallic chaseway to run through each room in the five-level dormitory. They then had to "hack open" walls in order to run the wires into a box. All of the wires connect to the basement through holes in the floor, where an intricate set of trays and pipes were installed along the ceiling. The signal is carried to and from two new communication closets that were created to store all of the power necessary to run the ResNet system. Stouffer College House used a similar system, but since there are stores above the two-story building, DCCS had to coordinate their construction with those tenants. And for Van Pelt and DuBois, contractors built a series of dry wall soffits to accommodate the necessary facilities. Last summer ResNet services were extended into High Rise East, High Rise South, Modern Language College House and Ware College House. By the fall, the only residences that will be not have access to ResNet services are the Quadrangle -- with the exception of Ware College House -- the Graduate Towers and the Castle. Residential Living Director Gigi Simeone said her department faced a tough choice when determining which dorms should be wired for ResNet this summer. Simeone added that a cross-section of residences was selected in order to give students more options. However, she said her department has not yet determined if the remaining buildings will be wired for ResNet next summer. "If we could wave a magic wand, we would do all of them," she said.