University prepares for Hurricane Sandy

'Frankenstorm' is forecasted to hit Philadelphia region early Tuesday morning

· October 26, 2012, 4:44 pm

UPDATE October 27, 7:00 p.m.: Mayor Michael Nutter has declared a State of Emergency for Philadelphia, effective Sunday at 5 a.m. to Tuesday at 5 p.m.

The University’s Crisis Management Team is closely monitoring an imminent hurricane headed toward the Philadelphia region early Tuesday morning.

Hurricane Sandy, also being dubbed “Frankenstorm,” is making its way toward the East Coast after killing at least 41 people as it swept across the Caribbean.

Weather forecasters are predicting the storm will hit somewhere between Virginia and New England in the next few days. The National Weather Service is predicting Sandy will move through Philadelphia Tuesday morning and may cause flooding and power outages. Some experts are saying Sandy could be the worst storm to hit the Northeast in 100 years.

The University alerted the entire community Friday afternoon through an email and ensured that it is taking extra precautions to ensure campus safety.

According to the Wall Street Journal, government forecasters are warning that Sandy could be more severe than Hurricane Irene, which brought strong winds and heavy rain to the East Coast in August 2011. The hurricane caused Penn to postpone early move-in and pre-orientation programs.

As of Friday afternoon, the University expects normal operations to proceed on Monday.

Updates will be posted on Penn’s and the Division of Public Safety’s websites. Students, faculty and staff can also call 215-898-MELT for the storm’s possible effects on class and work schedules.

University City Housing and The Radian management, among others, have also sent warning messages to residents to prepare for the storm.

Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter held a news conference Friday afternoon asking residents in flood-prone areas — including Manayunk and Eastwick neighborhoods — to to evacuate by 2 p.m. on Sunday.

Check back for updates on the storm’s impact on campus and city closings.

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